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Uss Cavalier (apa 37)
The term Cavalier
Cavalier
(/ˌkævəˈlɪər/) was first used by Roundheads as a term of abuse for the wealthier Royalist supporters of King Charles I and his son Charles II of England
Charles II of England
during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration (1642 – c. 1679). It was later adopted by the Royalists themselves. Although it referred originally to political and social attitudes and behaviour, of which clothing was a very small part, it has subsequently become strongly identified with the fashionable clothing of the court at the time
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Cavalier (other)
Cavalier
Cavalier
was a supporter of the Royalist cause during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms. Cavalier
Cavalier
may also refer to:Contents1 Generally 2 Corporations 3 Dance 4 People 5 Places 6 Publications 7 Sport teams 8 Transportation 9 OtherGenerally[edit] Cavalier
Cavalier
poets of the English Civil War Poet Cavalier
Cavalier
Parliament (1661–1679), Restoration Parliament cavalryman paladin, in some contexts knight Virginia Cavaliers
Virginia Cavaliers
(historical)Corporations[edit] Cavalier
Cavalier
Telephone and TV a, U.S
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Charles I In Three Positions
Charles I in Three Positions, also known as the Triple portrait of Charles I, is an oil painting of Charles I of England
Charles I of England
by Flemish artist Sir Anthony van Dyck, showing the king from three viewpoints: left full profile, face on, and right three-quarter profile. Painted in 1635 or 1636, it is currently part of the Royal Collection.[1] The colours of the costumes and pattern of the lace collars are different in each portrait, though the blue riband of the Order of the Garter
Order of the Garter
is present in all three.[1] The painting was sent to Rome in 1636 to be used as a reference work for the Italian sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini
Gian Lorenzo Bernini
to create a marble bust of Charles I
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Jacob Astley, 1st Baron Astley Of Reading
Jacob Astley, 1st Baron
Baron
Astley of Reading (1579 – February 1652) was a Royalist commander in the English Civil War.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He came from an established Norfolk
Norfolk
family, and was born at Melton Constable Hall. His first experiences of war were at the age of 18 when he joined the Islands Voyage expedition in 1597 under the Earl of Essex and Sir Walter Raleigh
Walter Raleigh
to the Azores. In 1598 he joined Maurice of Nassau and Henry of Orange in the Netherlands, where he served with distinction, and afterwards fought under Frederick V, Elector Palatine and Gustavus Adolphus
Gustavus Adolphus
in the Thirty Years' War
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Battle Of Edgehill
Charles I Prince Rupert Earl of Forth Lord Astley Lord Wilmot Lord Grandison Earl of Essex Lord FeildingStrength12,400: 2,500 horse, 800 dragoons, 9,100 foot, 16 guns 15,000: 2,300 horse, 700 dragoons, 12,000 foot, 7 gunsCasualties and losses500 dead 1,500 wounded 500 dead 1,500 wounded [1]v t eFirst English Civil War1st Hull Portsmouth Powick Bridge Kings Norton Edgehill Aylesbury Brentford Chichester Turnham Green Braddock Down Leeds 1st Middlewich Hopton Heath Seacroft Moor Camp Hill Lichfield Reading Ripple Field Sourton Down Stratton Wakefield 1st Worcester Chalgrove Field Adwalton Moor Burton Bridge Lansdowne Roundway Down 1st Bristol Gainsborough Gloucester Aldbourne Chase 1st Newbury 2nd Hull Heptonstall Winceby Olney Basing House Alton 2nd Middlewich Nantwich Lathom Newark Boldon Hill Stourbridge Heath Cheriton Selby Lyme Regis York Lincoln Bolton Tipton Green Cropredy Bridge Marston Moor Ormskirk Lostwithiel Montg
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First English Civil War
Parliamentarian- Covenanter
Covenanter
victoryKing Charles I held in custody[1] Subsequent power vacuum leads to the political supremacy of the New Model Army[1][2] Presbyterian-Independent tensions results in outbreak of the Second English Civil War[1]Belligerents Parliamentarians Covenanters English Royalists Scottish RoyalistsCommanders and leaders Sir Thomas Fairfax Oliver Cromwell Earl of Manchester Earl of Essex Lord Fairfax Sir William Waller Sir John Meldrum Sir William Brereton Robert Blake Earl of Leven Marquess of Argyll Sir David Leslie William Baillie Ch
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Second English Civil War
The Second English Civil War
English Civil War
(1648–1649) was the second of three wars known collectively as the English Civil War
English Civil War
(or Wars), which refers to the series of armed conflicts and political machinations which took place between Parliamentarians and Royalists from 1642 until 1651 and also include the First
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Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl Of Rochester
Lieutenant-General Henry Wilmot, 1st Earl of Rochester
Earl of Rochester
(26 October 1612 – 19 February 1658), known as The Lord Wilmot between 1643 and 1644 and as The Viscount Wilmot
Viscount Wilmot
between 1644 and 1652, was an English Cavalier
Cavalier
who fought for the Royalist cause during the Wars of the Three Kingdoms.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 1630s and early 1640s 3 First Civil War 4 Third Civil War 5 Interregnum 6 Family 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further readingEarly life[edit] Wilmot's family was descended from Edward Wilmot of Witney, Oxfordshire, whose son Charles Wilmot, 1st Viscount Wilmot
Charles Wilmot, 1st Viscount Wilmot
had served with distinction in Ireland during Tyrone's Rebellion
Tyrone's Rebellion
at the beginning of the 17th century, and was president of Connaught from 1616 until his death
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George Goring, Lord Goring
George Goring, Lord Goring
George Goring, Lord Goring
(14 July 1608 – 1657) was an English Royalist soldier. He was known by the courtesy title Lord Goring as the eldest son of the first Earl of Norwich.Contents1 Early life 2 Experience before the Civil Wars 3 Lieutenant-General
Lieutenant-General
of Horse 4 Exile and command in Spain 5 Character assessment 6 Family 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Goring, the eldest son of George Goring, 1st Earl of Norwich, was born on 14 July 1608. He soon became famous at court for his prodigality and dissolute manners. Experience before the Civil Wars[edit] His father-in-law, Richard Boyle, 1st Earl of Cork, procured for him a post in the Dutch Army with the rank of colonel
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Edward Hyde, 1st Earl Of Clarendon
Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon
Earl of Clarendon
(18 February 1609 – 9 December 1674) was an English statesman who served as Lord Chancellor to King Charles II from 1658, two years before the Restoration of the Monarchy, until 1667. He was loyal to the king and built-up the royalist cause and served as the chief minister after 1660. He was one of the most important historians of England, as author of the most influential contemporary history of the Civil War, The History of the Rebellion (1702). He was the maternal grandfather of two monarchs, Queen Mary II and Queen Anne.Contents1 Origins 2 Education 3 Legal career 4 Political career 5 Civil War 6 Restoration6.1 Chief Minister 6.2 Downfall7 Later years and exile 8 Family 9 Styles of address 10 Portrayals in drama and fiction 11 Bibliography 12 See also 13 Notes 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External linksOrigins[edit] Hyde was the third son[2] of Henry Hyde (d
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Exclusion Crisis
The Exclusion Crisis
Exclusion Crisis
ran from 1679 through 1681 in the reign of King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland. Three Exclusion bills sought to exclude the King's brother and heir presumptive, James, Duke of York, from the thrones of England, Scotland and Ireland because he was Roman Catholic. None became law. Two new parties formed. The Tories were opposed to this exclusion while the "Country Party", who were soon to be called the Whigs, supported it.Contents1 Background 2 Crises 3 The End of the Crisis 4 In fiction 5 Notes 6 See also 7 Further readingBackground[edit]Portrait of the Duke of York as Lord High Admiral of England. In 1673, the Duke of York, who had converted to Catholicism, resigned as Lord High Admiral rather than take the anti-Catholic oath prescribed by the Test Act.Engraving showing "A Solemn Mock Procession of the Pope" held in London on 17 November 1680
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Whigs (British Political Party)
The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution
Glorious Revolution
of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories
Tories
back in. The "Whig Supremacy" (1715–1760) was enabled by the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714 and the failed Jacobite rising of 1715
Jacobite rising of 1715
by Tory rebels
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Cavalier Poet
The cavalier poets was a school of English poets of the 17th century, that came from the classes that supported King Charles I during the English Civil War. Charles, a connoisseur of the fine arts, supported poets who created the art he craved. These poets in turn grouped themselves with the King and his service, thus becoming Cavalier Poets.[1] A cavalier was traditionally a mounted soldier or knight, but when the term was applied to those who supported Charles, it was meant to portray them as roistering gallants.[2] The term was thus meant to belittle and insult. They were separate in their lifestyle and divided on religion from the Roundheads, who supported Parliament, consisting often of Puritans (either Presbyterians or Independents). The best known of the cavalier poets are Robert Herrick, Richard Lovelace, Thomas Carew, and Sir John Suckling. Most of the cavalier poets were courtiers, with notable exceptions
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Independent (religion)
In English church history, Independents advocated local congregational control of religious and church matters, without any wider geographical hierarchy, either ecclesiastical or political. Independents reached particular prominence between 1642 and 1660, in the period of the English Civil War
English Civil War
and of the Commonwealth and Protectorate, wherein the Parliamentary Army became the champion of Independent religious views against the Anglicanism
Anglicanism
or the Catholicism of Royalists and the Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
favoured by Parliament itself. The Independents advocated freedom of religion for non-Catholics.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] During the First Civil War, the Parliamentary cause was supported by an alliance of Anglicans who supported Parliamentary traditions, Presbyterians and Independents
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John Everett Millais
Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (/ˈmɪleɪ/; 8 June 1829 – 13 August 1896) was an English painter and illustrator who was one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.[1] A child prodigy, at the age of eleven Millais became the youngest student to enter the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
Schools. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was founded at his family home in London, at 83 Gower Street (now number 7). Millais became the most famous exponent of the style, his painting Christ in the House of His Parents
Christ in the House of His Parents
(1850) generating considerable controversy, and painting perhaps the embodiment of the school, Ophelia, in 1851. However, by the mid-1850s Millais was moving away from the Pre-Raphaelite style and developing a new and powerful form of realism in his art
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The Proscribed Royalist, 1651
The Proscribed Royalist, 1651
The Proscribed Royalist, 1651
(1853) is a painting by John Everett Millais which depicts a young Puritan
Puritan
woman protecting a fleeing Royalist
Royalist
after the Battle of Worcester
Battle of Worcester
in 1651,[citation needed] the decisive defeat of Charles II by Oliver Cromwell. The Royalist
Royalist
is hiding in a hollow tree, a reference to a famous incident in which Charles himself hid in a tree to escape from his pursuers.[citation needed] Millais was also influenced by Vincenzo Bellini's opera I Puritani. Millais painted the picture in Hayes, Kent, from a local oak tree that became known as the Millais Oak.[2] Notes[edit]^ "The Proscribed Royalist, 1651". Birmingham Museums. Retrieved 23 September 2017.  ^ Millais, J.G., Life and Letters of Sir John Everett Millais, vol
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