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Trodds Copse
Trodds Copse
Trodds Copse
(grid reference SU417224) is a 25.23 hectare biological Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
(SSSI), in central Hampshire, notified in 1989. It comprises ancient semi-natural woodland, unimproved meadows and flushes.[1]Contents1 Location 2 Description 3 History 4 Flora 5 Fauna 6 References 7 External linksLocation[edit] The copse is situated to the north-west of Chandler's Ford
Chandler's Ford
between Flexford Road and Hook Road and adjoins the Eastleigh to Romsey railway line. Description[edit] The citation for the SSSI says: Trodds Copse
Trodds Copse
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Site of Special Scientific Interest
comprises ancient semi-natural woodland, unimproved meadows and flushes overlying Bracklesham Beds, Bagshot Sand, peat and alluvium
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Site Of Special Scientific Interest
A Site of Special
Special
Scientific Interest (SSSI) in Great Britain
Great Britain
or an Area of Special
Special
Scientific Interest (ASSI) in the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Isle of Man. SSSI/ASSIs are the basic building block of site-based nature conservation legislation and most other legal nature/geological conservation designations in the United Kingdom are based upon them, including national nature reserves, Ramsar sites, Special
Special
Protection Areas, and Special
Special
Areas of Conservation
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Galium Uliginosum
Galium
Galium
uliginosum or fen bedstraw is a plant species of the genus Galium. It is widespread across most of Europe as well as Morocco, Western Siberia, Turkey, Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
and Xinjiang. It is reportedly naturalized in New Zealand, Greenland
Greenland
and the Crozet Islands.[1][2] Galium
Galium
uliginosum is a component of purple moor grass and rush pastures – a type of Biodiversity Action Plan habitat in the UK. It occurs on poorly drained neutral and acidic soils of the lowlands and upland fringe. It is found in the South West of England, especially in Devon.[3] Galium
Galium
uliginosum is easily confused with marsh bedstraw, Galium palustre, but is distinguished from this species by having bristly edges on its leaves, and not turning black when it dries out
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Agrostis Canina
Agrostis canina, commonly known as velvety bentgrass,[2] brown bent or velvet bent,[3] is a species of grass.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and ecology 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit]InflorescenceAgrostis canina is a perennial plant, with stolons but no rhizomes, and culms which grow to a height of up to 75 centimetres (30 in).[4] It is frequently confused with Agrostis vinealis (formerly treated as a subspecies or variety of A
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Arrhenatherum Elatius
Arrhenatherum
Arrhenatherum
elatius, with the common names false oat-grass, tall oat-grass, tall meadow oat, onion couch and tuber oat-grass, is a perennial species of grass, common in the temperate regions of Europe. This bunchgrass is often used as an ornamental grass. It is native to Europe
Europe
but can be found elsewhere as an introduced species. It is found especially in prairies, at the side of roads and in uncultivated fields. The bulbous variety can be a weed of arable land. It is palatable grass for livestock and is used both as forage (pasture) and fodder (hay and silage); it has high amounts of phosphorus and calcium in its tissues.[citation needed] Two subspecies have been described: Arrhenatherum
Arrhenatherum
elatius subsp. elatius, the more common variety. Arrhenatherum
Arrhenatherum
elatius var
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Caltha Palustris
Trollius paluster Krause Caltha
Caltha
palustris, known as marsh-marigold[1] and kingcup, is a small to medium size perennial herbaceous plant of the family Ranunculaceae, native to marshes, fens, ditches and wet woodland in temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. It flowers between April and August, dependent on altitude and latitude, but occasional flowers may occur at other times.Contents1 Description 2 Habitat2.1 Inflorescence3 Taxonomy3.1 Taxonomic history 3.2 Etymology4 Culture 5 Subdivision, synonymy and culture varieties 6 Ecology6.1 Pollination 6.2 Seed dispersal 6.3 Diseases7 Use 8 Toxicology 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksDescription[edit] Caltha
Caltha
palustris is a 10–80 cm high, hairless, fleshy, perennial, herbaceous plant, that dies down in autumn and overwinters with buds near the surface of the marshy soil. The plants have many, 2–3 mm thick strongly branching roots
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Carex Disticha
Carex disticha is a Eurasian species of sedge known as the brown sedge[1] or, in North America, tworank sedge.[2] Distribution[edit] Carex disticha is native to parts of Northern and Western Europe, where it grows in moist spots in a number of habitat types, and it has been introduced to the Great Lakes region of southern Canada.[3] In its native range, this species is often associated with the Juncus subnodulosus–Cirsium palustre fen-meadow habitat.[4] Carex disticha has also been introduced to Canada, where it is known from only two sites, in Ontario and Quebec.[3][5] References[edit]^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.  ^ "Carex disticha". Natural Resources Conservation Service PLANTS Database. USDA. Retrieved 11 January 2016.  ^ a b "Carex disticha". Flora of North America. 2009. Retrieved December 4, 2009.  ^ C. Michael Hogan (2009). N. Strömberg, ed
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Carex Laevigata
Carex laevigata, the smooth-stalked sedge,[1] is a species of sedge. It lives in moist, shady environment in the lowlands of Western and Central Europe, particularly in alder–ash woodland.[2] It is distinguished from similar species, such as C. binervis and C. distans by the presence of tiny red dots on the utricles.[2] Carex laevigata was first described by James Edward Smith in 1800, in a paper in the journal Transactions of the Linnean Society of London.[3] References[edit]^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.  ^ a b A. C. Jermy; D. A. Simpson; M. J. Y. Foley; M. S. Porter (2007). "Carex laevigata Sm.". Sedges of the British Isles. BSBI Handbook No. 1 (3rd ed.). Botanical Society of the British Isles. pp. 356–357. ISBN 978-0-901158-35-2.  ^ James Edward Smith (1800). "Descriptions of five new British species of Carex"
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Carex Paniculata
Carex paniculata, also called greater tussock-sedge,[1] is a species of flowering plant in the Cyperaceae family which is 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) high and can be found in most of Europe (including Britain), Northwest Asia and North America.[2] References[edit]^ "BSBI List 2007". Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland. Archived from the original (xls) on 2015-01-25. Retrieved 2014-10-17.  ^ "Carex paniculata". PFAF. Retrieved May 13, 2013. Taxon identifiersWd: Q158234 APDB: 156627 EoL: 1123731 EPPO: CRXPN GBIF: 2723371 GRIN: 409309 iNaturalist: 208495 IPNI: 30075588-2 ITIS: 808434 IUCN: 164108 NCBI: 240683 NZOR: b9972e73-80b1-42ff-8dfc-39e5d2a2ec2e Plant List: kew-229486 PLANTS: CAPA74 Tropicos: 9900053 WCSP: 229486This Carex article is a stub
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Saxifrage
Boecherarctica Á.Löve Cascadia A.M.Johnson Micranthes
Micranthes
Haw. Zahlbrucknera Rchb. Saxifraga
Saxifraga
is the largest genus in the family Saxifragaceae, containing about 440 species of holarctic perennial plants, known as saxifrages[2] or rockfoils.[3] The Latin
Latin
word saxifraga means literally "stone-breaker", from Latin
Latin
saxum ("rock" or "stone") + frangere ("to break")
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Epipactis Purpurata
Epipactis purpurata (Violet Helleborine) is an orchid found in France, the United Kingdom, Slovenia and Serbia.[1] References[edit]^ V. Djordjevic; G. Tomovic; D. Lakucis (2010). "EPIPACTIS PURPURATA SM. (ORCHIDACEAE) – A NEW SPECIES IN THE FLORA OF SERBIA" (PDF). Arch. Biol. Sci. 62 (4): 1175–1179. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-04-02. External links[edit] Media related to Epipactis purpurata at Wikimedia Commons Data related to Epipactis purpurata at Wikispecies inpn.mnhn.fr (French)Taxon identifiersWd: Q159293 EoL: 1098348 EPPO: EPPPU GBIF: 5318906 iNaturalist: 140688 IPNI: 633313-1 IUCN: 175965 NCBI: 858887 PalDat: Epipactis_purpurata Plant List: kew-70346 Plazi: 6D879408-1DBC-E4B8-74BA-4FE25EB3612A Species+: 23244 Tropicos: 23507490 WCSP: 70346This Epidendroideae-related article is a stub
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Filipendula Ulmaria
Filipendula
Filipendula
ulmaria, commonly known as meadowsweet[1] or mead wort,[2] is a perennial herb in the family Rosaceae
Rosaceae
that grows in damp meadows. It is native throughout most of Europe
Europe
and Western Asia
Western Asia
(Near east and Middle east). It has been introduced and naturalised in North America. Meadowsweet has also been referred to as queen of the meadow,[1] pride of the meadow, meadow-wort, meadow queen, lady of the meadow, dollof, meadsweet, and bridewort.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Habitat 4 Herbal and pharmacological 5 History and etymology 6 Range 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit]The meadowsweet rust gall on leaf midribThe stems are 1–2 m (3.3–6.6 ft) tall, erect and furrowed, reddish to sometimes purple
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Galium Palustre
Galium palustre, the common marsh bedstraw[1] or simply marsh-bedstraw,[2] is a herbaceous annual plant of the family Rubiaceae. This plant is widely distributed, native to virtually every country in Europe, plus Morocco, the Azores, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Western Siberia, Greenland, eastern Canada, St. Pierre & Miquelon, and parts of the United States (primarily the Michigan and the Northeast, but with isolated populations in Tennessee, Montana, Washington and Oregon). The species is classified as a noxious weed in New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont and New Hampshire. It is considered naturalized in Kamchatka, Australia, New Zealand and Argentina.[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Ecology 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksEcology[edit] In Britain, Galium palustre is part of the British NVC Community M23 (Juncus effusus/acutiflorus – Galium palustre rush-pasture)
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Geum Rivale
Geum
Geum
rivale, the water avens, is a flowering plant of the family Rosaceae. Other names for the plant are nodding avens, drooping avens, cure-all, water flower and Indian chocolate.[1] It is native to much of Europe, with the exception of Mediterranean areas, as well as some parts of Central Asia
Central Asia
and North America.[2] In North America, it is known as purple avens.[3] It grows in bogs and damp meadows,[4] and produces nodding red flowers from May to September.[5] The plant is a native perennial of slow-draining or wet soils and can tolerate mildly acidic to calcareous conditions in full sun or under partial shade. Habitats include stream sides, pond edges, damp deciduous woodland and hay meadows.[6] G. rivale is pollinated primarily by bees, less often by flies and beetles. As the flower matures, elongation of the stamens ensures it self-fertilises if not already cross-pollinated
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Sorbus Aucuparia
Sorbus
Sorbus
aucuparia, commonly called rowan and mountain-ash, is a species of deciduous tree or shrub in the rose family. It is a highly variable species, and botanists have used different definitions of the species to include or exclude trees native to certain areas; a recent definition[1] includes trees native to most of Europe and parts of Asia, as well as northern Africa. The range extends from Madeira
Madeira
and Iceland
Iceland
to Russia
Russia
and northern China. Unlike many plants with similar distributions, it is not native to Japan.[1] S. aucuparia has a slender trunk with smooth bark, a loose and roundish crown, and its leaves are pinnate in pairs of leaflets on a central vein with a terminal leaflet. It blossoms from May to June in dense corymbs of small yellowish white flowers and develops small red pomes as fruit that ripen from August to October and are eaten by many bird species
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Hedera Helix
Hedera
Hedera
helix, the common ivy, English ivy, European ivy, or just ivy, is a species of flowering plant in the family Araliaceae, native to most of Europe and western Asia
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