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Tom Jackson
Thomas, Tom, or Tommy Jackson may refer to:Contents1 In the military 2 In politics and government 3 In sports 4 In the arts 5 OtherIn the military[edit]Stonewall Jackson, Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson (1824–1863), Confederate general Thomas Norman Jackson
Thomas Norman Jackson
(1897–1918), English soldier, Victoria Cross recipient Thomas Jackson (Royal Navy officer) (1868–1945), Royal Navy officerIn politics and government[edit] Thomas Jackson (trade unionist) (a.k.a. Tom Jackson, 1925–2003), British labour rights organizer Thomas A. Jackson
Thomas A. Jackson
(1879–1955), socialist and Communist leader Thomas B. Jackson (1797–1881), U.S. Representative from New York Thomas Hughes Jackson (1834–1930), mayor of Birkenhead Thomas Penfield Jackson (1937–2013), former U.S
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Stonewall Jackson
Mexican–American War American Civil WarGreat Train Raid of 1861 Battle of Falling Waters First Battle of Bull Run
First Battle of Bull Run
(First Manassas)  (WIA) Romney Expedition Jackson's Valley CampaignFirst Battle of Kernstown Battle of Front Royal First Battle of Winchester Battle of Port RepublicSeven Days BattlesBattle of Gaines's Mill Battle of Savage's Station Battle of White Oak Swamp Battle of Malvern HillNorthern
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Thomas Jackson (architect)
Thomas Jackson (1807–1890) was a 19th-century Irish architect who contributed to the iconic baroque look of Belfast city. He was described as being the foremost Belfast architect of his day.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Notable works 4 Gallery 5 Portfolio 6 References 7 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Thomas Jackson was born in the city of Waterford, Ireland, in 1807. His parents were Anthony Jackson and Elizabeth Pim,[2] both practising Quakers. In fact, Thomas Jackson's great-great-great Grandfather was in attendance during the very first Irish Quaker meeting of 1654.[citation needed] Thomas Jackson would later contribute to the local Quaker movement by designing many of the Friends meeting houses in Northern Ireland.[3] Jackson married Lydia Newsom Ridgeway, another member of the Waterford Quaker community, on New Year's Day 1835
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Thomas Graham Jackson
Sir Thomas Graham Jackson, 1st Baronet RA (21 December 1835 – 7 November 1924) was one of the most distinguished English architects of his generation. He is best remembered for his work at Oxford
Oxford
for Oxford
Oxford
Military College as well as the University, notably: the Examination Schools, most of Hertford College (including the Bridge of Sighs over New College Lane), much of Brasenose College, a range at Trinity College, and the Acland Nursing Home in North Oxford. Much of his career was devoted to the architecture of education and he worked extensively for various schools, notably Giggleswick
Giggleswick
and his own alma mater Brighton College. Jackson designed the former town hall in Tipperary Town, Ireland. He also worked on many parish churches and the college chapel at the University of Wales, Lampeter. He is also famous for designing the chapel (amongst other things) at Radley College
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Thomas R. Jackson
Thomas R. Jackson (1826–1901) was an English-born American architect who rose to the position of head draftsman in the office of Richard Upjohn (1802–1872), one of New York's most prominent designers; in his position in Upjohn's office he was one of the designers in the construction of Trinity Church, New York.[1] The nature of his other work with Jackson is not known. The comparatively unknown[2] Jackson was a prolific architect in his own right. Jackson emigrated as a child to the United States
United States
with his parents. His five-story building constructed for the New York Times
New York Times
at 41 Park Row, 1851 (or 1857–1858),[3] was the first purpose-designed structure for a New York newspaper
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Thomas E. Jackson
Thomas E. Jackson (July 4, 1886 — September 7, 1967) was an American stage and screen actor. His 67-year career spanned eight decades and two centuries, during which time he appeared in over a dozen Broadway plays, produced two others, acted in over a 130 films, as well as numerous television shows. He was most frequently credited as Thomas Jackson and occasionally as Tom Jackson or Tommy Jackson.Contents1 Life and career 2 Partial filmography 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] A native of New York City, Jackson began his career as a child actor in Broadway productions at the age of twelve, in the production The Ragged Earl, which had a short run at the Academy of Music in 1899.[1] He appeared in several more productions as a youth over the next four years, before taking a ten-year absence from the stage
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Tommy Jackson (musician)
Thomas Lee "Tommy" Jackson, Jr. (March 31, 1926 – December 9, 1979) was an American fiddle player, regarded as "one of the finest commercial fiddle players of all time".[1] He played on hundreds of country records from the 1940s to the 1970s, and it has been claimed that he "has probably been heard on more country records than any other musician".[2] Biography[edit] Born in Birmingham, Alabama, he moved to Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville, Tennessee
as a baby with his family. Something of a child prodigy as a fiddle player, he toured with Johnnie Wright
Johnnie Wright
and Kitty Wells, and performed as a teenager with the Curley Williams and Paul Howard bands at the Grand Ole Opry, before serving as a tail gunner in the Army Air Corps in World War II.[1][2][3] On his return to civilian life in 1946, he toured with Whitey Ford and others before joining Red Foley's orchestra at the Opry
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Tom Jackson (actor)
Thomas Dale Jackson, OC (born 27 October 1948), is a Canadian-born Métis actor and singer perhaps best known for the annual series of Christmas
Christmas
concerts, called the Huron Carole, which he created and starred in for 18 years. He was the Chancellor of Trent University from 2009 until 2013. His best known television roles are Billy Twofeathers on Shining Time Station
Shining Time Station
and Peter Kenidi on North of 60.Contents1 Life and career 2 Philanthropy 3 Honours and decorations 4 Filmography 5 Discography5.1 Albums 5.2 Singles6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] A Métis,[1] Jackson was born to Rose, a Cree, and Marshall, an Englishman, on the One Arrow Reserve, Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan
near Batoche. He moved with his family to Namao, Alberta
Namao, Alberta
at age seven
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The Lost Squire Of Inglewood
The Lost Squire of Inglewood is an Adventure story book of Thomas Jackson published in 1905 by Thomas Nelson and Sons, Ltd. A review in The Sydney Mail explained that the book is about the adventures of two boys who run away from school and discover hidden tunnels in the forest from the days of Robin Hood.[1] References[edit]^ "Books we Read". The Sydney Mail. 18 March 1903. p. 646. This short story–related article is a stub
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Thomas Jackson (theologian)
Thomas Jackson (1579 – 1640) was an English theologian, and President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford. Originally a Calvinist, he became in later life an Arminian.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Views 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Witton-le-Wear, County Durham, and educated at the University of Oxford, where he attended Queen’s College from 1595.[2] He became a probationer fellow of Corpus Christi College in 1606, and was soon afterwards elected vice-president there.[1] In 1623 James Thomas Jackson was presented to the living of St Nicholas, Newcastle, and about 1625 to the living of Winston, County Durham. In 1631 he was appointed President of Corpus;[3] and in 1632 Charles I presented him to the living of Witney, Oxfordshire
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Thomas Jackson (Bishop-designate Of Lyttelton)
Thomas Jackson (1 September 1812 – 18 March 1886), was an English Anglican clergyman appointed in 1850 as Bishop Designate of the newly founded settlement of Lyttelton in New Zealand. After disagreements with the New Zealand
New Zealand
colonists, Jackson never took up the bishopric, and instead returned to England.Contents1 Early life 2 Appointment as Bishop Designate 3 New Zealand 4 Later life 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Jackson was born in 1812 to a Wesleyan clergyman. His father was Thomas Jackson and his mother was Ann Hollinshead. He was educated at St Saviour's School in Southwark, and St Mary Hall, Oxford
St Mary Hall, Oxford
where he graduated BA in 1834 and MA in 1837.[1] Appointment as Bishop Designate[edit] In 1844, aged 32, Jackson was appointed Principal of St John's Training College for teachers at Battersea. This college trained teachers for English Church schools
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Thomas Jackson (athlete)
Thomas Marshall Jackson (January 15, 1884 – February 22, 1967) was an American track and field athlete who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics. In 1908 he finished twelfth in the pole vault competition. External links[edit]list of American athletesThis biographical article about an American pole vaulter is a stub. You can help by expanding it.
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Sir Thomas Jackson, 1st Baronet
Sir Thomas Jackson, 1st Baronet, (Chinese: 昃臣; 1841 – 1915) was the third Chief Manager of The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. He was responsible for financing the development of Colonial Hong Kong under the first large scale bank.Contents1 Early years 2 Achievements 3 Legacy 4 References 5 External linksEarly years[edit] Sir Thomas Jackson was born on 4 June 1841 in Carrigallen, County Leitrim, Ireland, the second of six sons of David and Elizabeth Jackson. He spend his childhood in Crossmaglen, County Armagh, and in 1860 joined the Belfast Branch of the Bank of Ireland
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Thomas H. Jackson
Thomas H. Jackson (born June 20, 1950) was the ninth president of the University of Rochester, preceded by Dennis O'Brien. Jackson held the position of president from 1994 until he formally stepped down on June 30, 2005 and was succeeded by Joel Seligman. Jackson's tenure was marked by the controversial "Renaissance Plan", which cut undergraduate enrollment while making admission more selective, and cut several graduate programs. He holds the position of Distinguished University Professor and has faculty appointments in the department of political science and in the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Rochester
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Thomas Horatio Jackson
Thomas Horatio Jackson (1879–1935) was a Nigerian newspaper editor and publisher, who has been called a "veritable titan of the Lagos Press".[1] Jackson's career, like that of his father John Payne Jackson, has been said to "exemplify the militant and crusading zeal of the pioneer journalists" in Nigeria.[2] Life[edit] After his father died in 1915 Jackson became editor of the Lagos Weekly Record.[3] In 1923 he was involved in the founding of the Nigerian National Democratic Party.[4] In 1925 Jackson was imprisoned for an article arguing that the Supreme Court judges were nothing more than tools of the executive.[5] References[edit]^ Davidson, Basil (1978). Africa in modern history: the search for a new society. Allen Lane. p. 171. Retrieved 8 November 2012.  ^ Olatunji Dare; Adidi Uyo (1996). Journalism in Nigeria: issues and perspectives. Nigerian Union of Journalists, Lagos State Council. p. 4. Retrieved 8 November 2012.  ^ Fred I. A. Omu (1978)
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Thomas "Thom" Jackson
EdisonLearning Inc., formerly known as Edison Schools Inc., is a for-profit education management organization for public schools in the United States and the United Kingdom. Edison is based in Jersey City, New Jersey. Edison primarily contracts with school districts on the basis of performance partnerships, alliances, and charter school establishment. In 2015, Edison managed schools enrolling 10,417 students on a vendor operated school basis.[2]:86Contents1 History 2 Approach to education 3 Expansion and contraction 4 Criticism 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] The company was founded in 1992 as the Edison Project, largely the brainchild of Chris Whittle. The expansion of Edison included the involvement of Tom Ingram (campaign manager and chief of staff to former Tennessee governor and United States Secretary of Education from 1991–1993, Lamar Alexander), Benno C. Schmidt, Jr., John Chubb (political scientist from the Hoover and Brookings Institutions), and Chester E
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