HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Titanocene Dichloride
Titanocene dichloride
Titanocene dichloride
is the organotitanium compound with the formula (η5-C5H5)2TiCl2, commonly abbreviated as Cp2TiCl2. This metallocene is a common reagent in organometallic and organic synthesis. It exists as a bright red solid that slowly hydrolyzes in air.[1] Cp2TiCl2 does not adopt the typical "sandwich" structure like ferrocene due to the 4 ligands around the metal centre, but rather takes on a distorted tetrahedral shape.[2] It shows antitumour activity and was the first non-platinum complex to undergo clinical trials as a chemotherapy drug.[3]Contents1 Preparation 2 Reactions2.1 Use in organic synthesis 2.2 Precursor to unusual sulfur allotropes 2.3 Reactions 2.4 Ti(II) derivatives, including titanocene 2.5 Derivatives of (C5Me5)2TiCl23 Medicinal research 4 References 5 Further readingPreparation[edit] The standard preparations of Cp2TiCl2 start with titanium tetrachloride
[...More...]

"Titanocene Dichloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemical Nomenclature
A chemical nomenclature is a set of rules to generate systematic names for chemical compounds. The nomenclature used most frequently worldwide is the one created and developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). The IUPAC's rules for naming organic and inorganic compounds are contained in two publications, known as the Blue Book[1] and the Red Book,[2] respectively. A third publication, known as the Green Book,[3] describes the recommendations for the use of symbols for physical quantities (in association with the IUPAP), while a fourth, the Gold Book,[4] contains the definitions of a large number of technical terms used in chemistry. Similar compendia exist for biochemistry[5] (the White Book, in association with the IUBMB), analytical chemistry[6] (the Orange Book), macromolecular chemistry[7] (the Purple Book) and clinical chemistry[8] (the Silver Book)
[...More...]

"Chemical Nomenclature" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Organometallic
Organometallic chemistry
Organometallic chemistry
is the study of organometallic compounds, chemical compounds containing at least one chemical bond between a carbon atom of an organic molecule and a metal, including alkaline, alkaline earth, and transition metals, and sometimes broadened to include metalloids like boron, silicon, and tin, as well.[1] Aside from bonds to organyl fragments or molecules, bonds to 'inorganic' carbon, like carbon monoxide (metal carbonyls), cyanide, or carbide, are generally considered to be organometallic as well. Some related compounds such as transition metal hydrides and metal phosphine complexes are often included in discussions of organometallic compounds, though strictly speaking, they are not necessarily organometallic. The related but distinct term "metalorganic compound" refers to metal-containing compounds lacking direct metal-carbon bonds but which contain organic ligands
[...More...]

"Organometallic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Methylmagnesium Chloride
Methylmagnesium chloride is an organometallic compound with the general formula CH3MgCl. This highly flammable and moisture sensitive material is the simplest Grignard reagent and is commercially available, usually as a solution in tetrahydrofuran. Like methyllithium, it is the synthetic equivalent to the methyl carbanion synthon. See also[edit]MethylationFurther reading[edit]Sakai, Shogo; Jordan, K. D. (1982). "Ab initio study of the structure and vibrational frequencies of the Grignard reagent methylmagnesium chloride". Journal of the American Chemical Society
[...More...]

"Methylmagnesium Chloride" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Methyllithium
Methyllithium
Methyllithium
is the simplest organolithium reagent with the empirical formula CH3Li. This s-block organometallic compound adopts an oligomeric structure both in solution and in the solid state. This highly reactive compound, invariably used as a solution in ethers, is a reagent in organic synthesis as well as organometallic chemistry. Operations involving methyllithium require anhydrous conditions, because the compound is highly reactive toward water. Oxygen
Oxygen
and carbon dioxide are also incompatible with MeLi. Methyllithium
Methyllithium
is usually not prepared, but purchased as a solution in various ethers.Contents1 Synthesis 2 Reactivity 3 Structure 4 Bonding 5 ReferencesSynthesis[edit] In the direct synthesis, methyl bromide is treated with a suspension of lithium in diethyl ether.2 Li + MeBr → LiMe + LiBrThe lithium bromide forms a complex with the methyllithium
[...More...]

"Methyllithium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

CAS Registry Number
A CAS Registry Number,[1] also referred to as CASRN or CAS Number, is a unique numerical identifier assigned by the Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) to every chemical substance described in the open scientific literature (currently including all substances described from 1957 through the present, plus some substances from the early or mid 1900s), including organic and inorganic compounds, minerals, isotopes, alloys and nonstructurable materials (UVCBs, of unknown, variable composition, or biological origin).[2] The Registry maintained by CAS is an authoritative collection of disclosed chemical substance information. It currently identifies more than 129 million organic and inorganic substances and 67 million protein and DNA sequences,[3] plus additional information about each substance
[...More...]

"CAS Registry Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Soxhlet Extraction
A Soxhlet extractor is a piece of laboratory apparatus[1] invented in 1879 by Franz von Soxhlet.[2] It was originally designed for the extraction of a lipid from a solid material. Typically, a Soxhlet extraction is used when the desired compound has a limited solubility in a solvent, and the impurity is insoluble in that solvent
[...More...]

"Soxhlet Extraction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Standard State
In chemistry, the standard state of a material (pure substance, mixture or solution) is a reference point used to calculate its properties under different conditions. In principle, the choice of standard state is arbitrary, although the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
Chemistry
(IUPAC) recommends a conventional set of standard states for general use.[1] IUPAC
IUPAC
recommends using a standard pressure po = 105 Pa.[2] Strictly speaking, temperature is not part of the definition of a standard state. For example, as discussed below, the standard state of a gas is conventionally chosen to be unit pressure (usually in bar) ideal gas, regardless of the temperature
[...More...]

"Standard State" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cyclopentadiene
Cyclopentadiene
Cyclopentadiene
is an organic compound with the formula C5H6. This colorless liquid has a strong and unpleasant odor. At room temperature, this cyclic diene dimerizes over the course of hours to give dicyclopentadiene via a Diels–Alder reaction. This dimer can be restored by heating to give the monomer. The compound is mainly used for the production of cyclopentene and its derivatives
[...More...]

"Cyclopentadiene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acicular (crystal Habit)
Acicular, in mineralogy, refers to a crystal habit composed of slender, needle-like crystals. Crystals
Crystals
with this habit tend to be fragile. Complete, undamaged acicular specimens are uncommon. The term "acicular" derives from the Late Latin
Late Latin
"acicula" meaning "little needle".[1] Strictly speaking, the word refers to a growth habit that is slender and tapering to a point. Prismatic crystals are not acicular; however, colloquial usage has altered the commonly understood meaning of the word. When writing for mineralogical publications, authors should restrict their usage of "acicular" to crystals with the tapering growth habit. To add to the confusion, some minerals are described with various morphological terms
[...More...]

"Acicular (crystal Habit)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Organic Synthesis
Organic synthesis is a special branch of chemical synthesis and is concerned with the intentional construction of organic compounds via organic reactions.[1] Organic molecules often contain a higher level of complexity than purely inorganic compounds, so that the synthesis of organic compounds has developed into one of the most important branches of organic chemistry
[...More...]

"Organic Synthesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

NFPA 704
"NFPA 704: Standard System for the Identification of the Hazards of Materials for Emergency Response" is a standard maintained by the U.S.-based National Fire Protection Association. First "tentatively adopted as a guide" in 1960,[1] and revised several times since then, it defines the colloquial "fire diamond" or "safety square" used by emergency personnel to quickly and easily identify the risks posed by hazardous materials. This helps determine what, if any, special equipment should be used, procedures followed, or precautions taken during the initial stages of an emergency response.Contents1 Codes 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCodes[edit]The four divisions are typically color-coded with red indicating flammability, blue indicating level of health hazard, yellow for chemical reactivity, and white containing codes for special hazards. Each of health, flammability and reactivity is rated on a scale from 0 (no hazard) to 4 (severe risk)
[...More...]

"NFPA 704" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydrolyzes
Hydrolysis
Hydrolysis
(/haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs/; from Ancient Greek hydro-, meaning 'water', and lysis, meaning 'to unbind') usually means the cleavage of chemical bonds by the addition of water. When a carbohydrate is broken into its component sugar molecules by hydrolysis (e.g. sucrose being broken down into glucose and fructose), this is termed saccharification
[...More...]

"Hydrolyzes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ligand
In coordination chemistry, a ligand[help 1] is an ion or molecule (functional group) that binds to a central metal atom to form a coordination complex. The bonding with the metal generally involves formal donation of one or more of the ligand's electron pairs. The nature of metal–ligand bonding can range from covalent to ionic. Furthermore, the metal–ligand bond order can range from one to three. Ligands are viewed as Lewis bases, although rare cases are known to involve Lewis acidic "ligands".[1][2] Metals and metalloids are bound to ligands in virtually all circumstances, although gaseous "naked" metal ions can be generated in high vacuum. Ligands in a complex dictate the reactivity of the central atom, including ligand substitution rates, the reactivity of the ligands themselves, and redox
[...More...]

"Ligand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tetrahedral
In geometry, a tetrahedron (plural: tetrahedra or tetrahedrons), also known as a triangular pyramid, is a polyhedron composed of four triangular faces, six straight edges, and four vertex corners. The tetrahedron is the simplest of all the ordinary convex polyhedra and the only one that has fewer than 5 faces.[1] The tetrahedron is the three-dimensional case of the more general concept of a Euclidean simplex, and may thus also be called a 3-simplex. The tetrahedron is one kind of pyramid, which is a polyhedron with a flat polygon base and triangular faces connecting the base to a common point. In the case of a tetrahedron the base is a triangle (any of the four faces can be considered the base), so a tetrahedron is also known as a "triangular pyramid". Like all convex polyhedra, a tetrahedron can be folded from a single sheet of paper
[...More...]

"Tetrahedral" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
(often abbreviated to chemo and sometimes CTX or CTx) is a category of cancer treatment that uses one or more anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapeutic agents) as part of a standardized chemotherapy regimen. Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
may be given with a curative intent (which almost always involves combinations of drugs), or it may aim to prolong life or to reduce symptoms (palliative chemotherapy). Chemotherapy
Chemotherapy
is one of the major categories of the medical discipline specifically devoted to pharmacotherapy for cancer, which is called medical oncology. The term chemotherapy has come to connote non-specific usage of intracellular poisons to inhibit mitosis, or cell division. The connotation excludes more selective agents that block extracellular signals (signal transduction)
[...More...]

"Chemotherapy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.