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Timeline Of Lgbt History
The following is a timeline of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) history.Contents1 Before the Common Era1.1 10th millennium BCE – 5th millennium BCE1.1.1 96th century BCE – 50th century BCE1.2 8th millennium BCE1.2.1 80th century BCE1.3 8th millennium BCE – 2nd millennium BCE1.3.1 70th century BCE – 17th century BCE1.4 3rd millennium BCE1.4.1 29th century BCE – 25th century BCE 1.4.2 24th century BCE 1.4.3 23rd century BCE or 23rd century BCE – 22nd century BCE1.5 2nd millennium BCE1.5.1 15th century BCE – 12th century BCE1.6 1st millennium BCE1.6.1 7th century BCE 1.6.2 6th century BCE 1.6.3 6th century BCE – 4th century 1.6.4 5th century BCE 1.6.5 4th century BCE 1.6.6 3rd century BCE 1.6.7 3rd or 2nd century BCE 1.6.8 1st century BCE2 Common Era2.1 1st millennium2.1.1 1st century 2.1.2 2nd century
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Leviticus
The Book
Book
of Leviticus (/lɪˈvɪtɪkəs/) is the third book of the Torah
Torah
and the third book of the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(Old Testament). The book addresses all the people of Israel
Israel
(1:2) though some passages specifically address the priests (6:8). Most of its chapters (1–7, 11–27) consist of God's speeches to Moses
Moses
which he is commanded to repeat to the Israelites. This takes place within the story of the Israelites' Exodus after they escaped Egypt and reached Mt. Sinai (Exodus 19:1). The Book of Exodus
Book of Exodus
narrates how Moses
Moses
led the Israelites in building the Tabernacle
Tabernacle
(Exodus 35–40) based on God's instructions (Exodus 25–31)
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Sappho
Sappho
Sappho
(/ˈsæfoʊ/; Aeolic Greek
Aeolic Greek
Ψάπφω, Psappho [psápːʰɔː]; c. 630 – c. 570 BC) was an archaic Greek poet from the island of Lesbos.[a] Sappho
Sappho
is known for her lyric poetry, written to be sung and accompanied by a lyre.[2] Most of Sappho's poetry is now lost, and what is extant has survived only in fragmentary form, except for one complete poem – the "Ode to Aphrodite". As well as lyric poetry, ancient commentators claimed that Sappho
Sappho
wrote elegiac and iambic poetry. Three epigrams attributed to Sappho
Sappho
are extant, but these are actually Hellenistic
Hellenistic
imitations of Sappho's style. Little is known of Sappho's life. She was from a wealthy family from Lesbos, though the names of both of her parents are uncertain
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Lesbos
Lesbos
Lesbos
(/ˈlɛzbɒs/, US: /ˈlɛzboʊs/; Greek: Λέσβος Lesvos, pronounced [ˈlezvos]), sometimes referred to as Mytilene
Mytilene
after its capital, is a Greek island located in the northeastern Aegean Sea. It has an area of 1,633 km2 (631 sq mi)[1] with 320 kilometres (199 miles) of coastline, making it the third largest island in Greece. It is separated from Turkey
Turkey
by the narrow Mytilini Strait and in late Palaeolithic/Mesolithic times[2] was joined to the Anatolian mainland before the end of the last glacial period. Lesbos
Lesbos
is also the name of a regional unit of the North Aegean
North Aegean
region, within which Lesbos
Lesbos
island is one of five governing islands. The others are Chios, Ikaria, Lemnos, and Samos
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Etruscan Civilization
Timeline Italy
Italy
portalv t eThe Etruscan civilization
Etruscan civilization
(/ɪˈtrʌskən/) is the modern name given to a powerful and wealthy civilization of ancient Italy
Italy
in the area corresponding roughly to Tuscany, western Umbria
Umbria
and northern Lazio.[2] As distinguished by its unique language, this civilization endured from before the time of the earliest Etruscan inscriptions (c. 700 BC)[3] until its assimilation into the Roman Republic, beginning in the late 4th century BC with the Roman–Etruscan Wars.[3] Culture that is identifiably Etruscan developed in Italy
Italy
after about 800 BC, approximately over the range of the preceding Iron Age Villanovan
Villanovan
culture. The latter gave way in the 7th century BC to a culture that was influenced by Ancient
Ancient
Greek culture
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Tomb Of The Bulls
The Tomb of the Bulls (Italian: Tomba dei Tori) is an Etruscan tomb in the Necropolis of Monterozzi near Tarquinia, Italy. It was discovered in 1892[1] and has been dated back to either 540–530 BC[2] or 530–520 BC.[3] According to an inscription Arath Spuriana apparently commissioned the construction of the tomb.[3] It is named after the two bulls which appear on one of its frescoes.[4] It is the earliest example of a tomb with complex frescoes in the necropolis.[5] Like other Etruscan tombs, it would originally have contained many grave goods, especially Etruscan pottery, now removed.Contents1 Description 2 Interpretations of the frescoes2.1 The Troilus fresco 2.2 The erotic fresco 2.3 The Chimaera fresco3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksDescription[edit]The entrance to the tombThe right scene of the erotic frescoThe fresco of the ambush of TroilusThe entrance to the tomb leads to the main chamber
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Necropolis
A necropolis (pl. necropoleis) is a large, designed cemetery with elaborate tomb monuments. The name stems from the Ancient Greek νεκρόπολις nekropolis, literally meaning "city of the dead". The term usually implies a separate burial site at a distance from a city, as opposed to tombs within cities, which were common in various places and periods of history. They are different from grave fields, which did not have remains above the ground. While the word is most commonly used for ancient sites, the name was revived in the early 19th century and applied to planned city cemeteries, such as the Glasgow Necropolis. History[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Tarquinia
Tarquinia
Tarquinia
(Italian: [tarˈkwiːnja]), formerly Corneto, is an old city in the province of Viterbo, Lazio, Italy
Italy
known chiefly for its outstanding and unique ancient Etruscan tombs in the widespread necropoli or cemeteries which it overlies, for which it was awarded UNESCO World Heritage status. In 1922 it was renamed after the ancient city of Tarquinii (Roman) or Tarch(u)na (Etruscan)
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Apotropaic
Apotropaic magic
Apotropaic magic
(from Greek apotrepein "to ward off" from apo- "away" and trepein "to turn") is a type of magic intended to turn away harm or evil influences, as in deflecting misfortune or averting the evil eye. Apotropaic observances may also be practiced out of vague superstition or out of tradition, as in good luck charms (perhaps some token on a charm bracelet), amulets, or gestures such as crossed fingers or knocking on wood. The Greeks
Greeks
made offerings to the averting gods (Ἀποτρόπαιοι θεοί: Apotropaioi Theoi), chthonic deities and heroes who grant safety and deflect evil.[1]Contents1 Symbols1.1 Egypt 1.2 Ancient Greece 1.3 Evil
Evil
eye 1.4 Grotesquerie 1.5 Other2 Good luck tokens and charms 3 Naming culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksSymbols[edit] Egypt[edit]This apotropaic wand shows a procession of protective deities
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Achilles
In Greek mythology, Achilles
Achilles
or Achilleus (/əˈkɪliːz/ ə-KIL-eez; Greek: Ἀχιλλεύς, Akhilleus [a.kʰil.le͜ús]) was a Greek hero of the Trojan War
Trojan War
and the central character and greatest warrior of Homer's Iliad. His mother was the immortal Nereid
Nereid
Thetis, and his father, the mortal Peleus, was the king of the Myrmidons. Achilles' most notable feat during the Trojan War
Trojan War
was the slaying of the Trojan hero Hector
Hector
outside the gates of Troy. Although the death of Achilles
Achilles
is not presented in the Iliad, other sources concur that he was killed near the end of the Trojan War
Trojan War
by Paris, who shot him in the heel with an arrow
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Troilus
Troilus[1] (English: /ˈtrɔɪləs/ or /ˈtroʊələs/; Ancient Greek: Τρωΐλος, translit. Troïlos; Latin: Troilus) is a legendary character associated with the story of the Trojan War. The first surviving reference to him is in Homer's Iliad, which some scholars theorize was composed by bards and sung in the late 9th or 8th century BC.[2] In Greek mythology, Troilus
Troilus
is a young Trojan prince, one of the sons of King Priam
Priam
(or Apollo) and Hecuba. Prophecies link Troilus' fate to that of Troy
Troy
and so he is ambushed and murdered by Achilles. Sophocles was one of the writers to tell this tale. It was also a popular theme among artists of the time. Ancient writers treated Troilus
Troilus
as the epitome of a dead child mourned by his parents
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Achaemenid Empire
The Achaemenid Empire
Empire
(/əˈkiːmənɪd/ c. 550–330 BC), also called the First Persian Empire,[11] was an empire based in Western Asia, founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans
Balkans
and Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration (through satraps under the King of Kings), for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army
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Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
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Polycrates
Polycrates
Polycrates
(/pəˈlɪkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Πολυκράτης, in English usually Polycrates
Polycrates
but sometimes Polykrates), son of Aeaces, was the tyrant of Samos
Samos
from c. 538 BC to 522 BC. He had a reputation as both a fierce warrior and an enlightened tyrant.Contents1 Establishment of his power 2 Religious and cultural activities 3 Polycrates' fate 4 Polycrates
Polycrates
in later culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksEstablishment of his power[edit] Polycrates
Polycrates
took power during a festival of Hera
Hera
with his brothers Pantagnotus and Syloson, but soon had Pantagnotus killed and exiled Syloson to take full control for himself
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Samos
Samos
Samos
(/ˈseɪmɒs, ˈsæmoʊs/; Greek: Σάμος) is a Greek island in the eastern Aegean Sea, south of Chios, north of Patmos
Patmos
and the Dodecanese, and off the coast of Asia Minor, from which it is separated by the 1.6-kilometre (1.0 mi)-wide Mycale
Mycale
Strait. It is also a separate regional unit of the North Aegean
North Aegean
region, and the only municipality of the regional unit. In ancient times Samos
Samos
was an especially rich and powerful city-state, particularly known for its vineyards and wine production.[1] It is home to Pythagoreion
Pythagoreion
and the Heraion of Samos, a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Site that includes the Eupalinian aqueduct, a marvel of ancient engineering
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