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Technophobia
Technophobia
Technophobia
(from Greek τέχνη technē, "art, skill, craft"[1] and φόβος phobos, "fear"[2]) is the fear or dislike of advanced technology or complex devices, especially computers.[3] Although there are numerous interpretations of technophobia, they become more complex as technology continues to evolve. The term is generally used in the sense of an irrational fear, but others contend fears are justified. It is related to cyberphobia and is the opposite of technophilia. Dr. Larry Rosen, a research psychologist, computer educator, and professor at the California State University, suggests that there are three dominant subcategories of technophobes - the "uncomfortable users", the "cognitive computerphobes", and "anxious computerphobes".[4] First receiving widespread notice during the Industrial Revolution, technophobia has been observed to affect various societies and communities throughout the world
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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Ordnung
The Ordnung is a set of rules for Amish, Old Order Mennonite and Conservative Mennonite living. Ordnung is the German word for order, discipline, rule, arrangement, organization, or system. Because the Amish have no central church government, each assembly is autonomous and is its own governing authority. Thus, every local church maintains an individual set of rules, adhering to its own Ordnung, which may vary from district to district as each community administers its own guidelines. These rules are largely unwritten, yet they define the very essence of Amish identity.[1][2] Conservative Mennonites refer to Ordnung by the English terms "discipline" or "standard" and are usually written.The Amish blueprint for expected behavior, called the Ordnung, regulates private, public, and ceremonial life. Ordnung does not translate readily into English. Sometimes rendered as ordinance or discipline, the Ordnung is best thought of as an ordering of the whole way of life ..
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Hiroshima
Hiroshima
Hiroshima
(広島市, Hiroshima-shi, Japanese: [çiɾoɕima]) is the capital of Hiroshima Prefecture
Hiroshima Prefecture
and the largest city in the Chūgoku region
Chūgoku region
of western Honshu
Honshu
- the largest island of Japan. Hiroshima, a name meaning "Broad Island", gained city status on April 1, 1889. On April 1, 1980, Hiroshima
Hiroshima
became a designated city. As of August 2016[update], the city has an estimated population of 1,196,274
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Nagasaki, Nagasaki
Nagasaki
Nagasaki
(長崎市, Nagasaki-shi, Japanese: [naɡaꜜsaki]) ( listen (help·info)) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture
Nagasaki Prefecture
on the island of Kyushu
Kyushu
in Japan. The city's name, 長崎, means "Long Cape" in Japanese. Nagasaki
Nagasaki
became a centre of colonial Portuguese and Dutch influence in the 16th through 19th centuries, and Churches and Christian Sites in Nagasaki
Churches and Christian Sites in Nagasaki
have been proposed for inscription on the UNESCO World Heritage List
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Nuclear Proliferation
Nuclear proliferation
Nuclear proliferation
is the spread of nuclear weapons, fissionable material, and weapons-applicable nuclear technology and information to nations not recognized as "Nuclear Weapon States" by the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, commonly known as the Non-Proliferation Treaty or NPT. Proliferation has been opposed by many nations with and without nuclear weapons, the governments of which fear that more countries with nuclear weapons may increase the possibility of nuclear warfare (up to and including the so-called "countervalue" targeting of civilians with nuclear weapons), de-stabilize international or regional relations, or infringe upon the national sovereignty of states. Four countries besides the five recognized Nuclear Weapons States have acquired, or are presumed to have acquired, nuclear weapons: India, Pakistan, North Korea, and Israel
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Cold War
The Cold War
Cold War
was a state of geopolitical tension after World War II between powers in the Eastern Bloc
Eastern Bloc
(the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
and its satellite states) and powers in the Western Bloc
Western Bloc
(the United States, its NATO allies and others). Historians do not fully agree on the dates, but a common timeframe is the period between 1947, the year the Truman Doctrine, a U.S. foreign policy pledging to aid nations threatened by Soviet expansionism, was announced, and either 1989, when communism fell in Eastern Europe, or 1991, when the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
collapsed
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed by North VietnamTerritorial changes Reunification of North and
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Environmentalism
Environmentalism
Environmentalism
or environmental rights is a broad philosophy, ideology, and social movement regarding concerns for environmental protection and improvement of the health of the environment, particularly as the measure for this health seeks to incorporate the impact of changes to the environment on humans, animals, plants and non-living matter. While environmentalism focuses more on the environmental and nature-related aspects of green ideology and politics, ecologism combines the ideology of social ecology and environmentalism
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Global Warming
Global warming, also referred to as climate change, is the observed century-scale rise in the average temperature of the Earth's climate system and its related effects.[1][2] Multiple lines of scientific evidence show that the climate system is warming.[3][4][5] Many of the observed changes since the 1950s are unprecedented in the instrumental temperature record which extends back to the mid-19th century, and in paleoclimate proxy records covering thousands of years.[6] In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Climate
Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report concluded that "It is extremely likely that human influence has been the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century."[7] The largest human influence has been the emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide
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Social Movement
A social movement is a type of group action. Social movements can be defined as "organizational structures and strategies that may empower oppressed populations to mount effective challenges and resist the more powerful and advantaged elites".[1] They are large, sometimes informal, groupings of individuals or organizations which focus on specific political or social issues. In other words, they carry out, resist, or undo a social change
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Amish
The Amish
Amish
(/ˈɑːmɪʃ/; Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
German: Amisch, German: Amische) are a group of traditionalist Christian church fellowships with Swiss Anabaptist
Anabaptist
origins. They are closely related to, but distinct from, Mennonite
Mennonite
churches. The Amish
Amish
are known for simple living, plain dress, and reluctance to adopt many conveniences of modern technology. The history of the Amish
Amish
church began with a schism in Switzerland within a group of Swiss and Alsatian Anabaptists
Anabaptists
in 1693 led by Jakob Ammann.[2] Those who followed Ammann became known as Amish.[3] In the early 18th century, many Amish
Amish
and Mennonites
Mennonites
immigrated to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
for a variety of reasons
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Donald Kraybill
Donald B. Kraybill (born 1946) is an author, lecturer, and educator on Anabaptist faiths and living.[1] Kraybill is widely recognized for his studies on Anabaptist groups, and is the foremost living expert on the Old Order Amish. Kraybill is Distinguished College Professor, and Senior Fellow at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania. He previously served as chair of the Sociology and Social Work Department at Elizabethtown from 1979 to 1985 and as director of the Young Center from 1989 to 1996
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William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
William Wordsworth
(7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature
English literature
with their joint publication Lyrical Ballads
Lyrical Ballads
(1798). Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semi-autobiographical poem of his early years that he revised and expanded a number of times
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Steven Nolt
Steven M. Nolt (born 1968 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania) is Senior Scholar and Professor of History and Anabaptist Studies at the Young Center for Anabaptist and Pietist Studies at Elizabethtown College.[1] The author of fourteen books, most of which focus on Amish and Mennonite history and culture, Nolt is a frequent source for journalists and other researching Anabaptist groups. He was often quoted in the aftermath of the 2006 West Nickel Mines School shooting at Nickel Mines, Pennsylvania.Contents1 Education 2 Notable works 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] He received his B.A. from Goshen College in 1990, and an M.A. in 1994 from Associated Mennonite Biblical Seminary. He received an M.A. in 1996 and a Ph.D
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