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Tadao Ando
Alvar Aalto Medal, 1985 Carlsberg Architectural Prize, 1992 Pritzker Prize, 1995 RIBA Royal Gold Medal, 1997 AIA Gold Medal, 2002 Neutra Medal for Professional Excellence, 2012Practice Tadao Ando
Tadao Ando
Architects & AssociatesBuildingsRow House, Sumiyoshi, 1979 Church of the Light, Osaka, 1989 Water Temple, Awaji, 1991Projects Rokko Housing I, II, III, Kobe, 1983-1999 Tadao Ando
Tadao Ando
(安藤 忠雄, Andō Tadao, born September 13, 1941) is a Japanese self-taught architect[1][2] whose approach to architecture and landscape was categorized by architectural historian Francesco Dal Co as "critical regionalism"
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Minato-ku, Osaka
Minato (港区, Minato-ku) is one of 24 wards of Osaka, Japan. It has an area of 7.9 km², and a population of 84,961
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Setagaya, Tokyo
Setagaya
Setagaya
(世田谷区, Setagaya-ku) is a special ward in Tokyo, Japan. It is also the name of a neighborhood and administrative district within the ward. The ward calls itself Setagaya
Setagaya
City in English.[1] Its official bird is the azure-winged magpie, its flower the fringed orchid, and its tree the Zelkova serrata. Setagaya
Setagaya
has the largest population and second largest area (after Ōta) of Tokyo's special wards
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Concrete
Concrete
Concrete
is a composite material composed of fine and coarse aggregate bonded together with a fluid cement (cement paste) that hardens over time. Most concretes used are lime-based concretes such as Portland cement concrete or concretes made with other hydraulic cements, such as calcium aluminate cements. However, asphalt concrete, which is frequently used for road surfaces, is also a type of concrete, where the cement material is bitumen, and polymer concretes are sometimes used where the cementing material is a polymer. When aggregate is mixed together with dry Portland cement
Portland cement
and water, the mixture forms a fluid slurry that is easily poured and molded into shape
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Atrium (architecture)
In architecture, an atrium (plural: atria or atriums)[1] is a large open air or skylight covered space surrounded by a building.[2] Atria were a common feature in Ancient Roman dwellings, providing light and ventilation to the interior. Modern atria, as developed in the late 19th and 20th centuries, are often several stories high and having a glazed roof or large windows, and often located immediately beyond the main entrance doors (in the lobby). Atria are a popular design feature because they give their buildings a "feeling of space and light."[3] The atrium has become a key feature of many buildings in recent years.[4] Atria are popular with building users, building designers and building developers. Users like atria because they create a dynamic and stimulating interior that provides shelter from the external environment while maintaining a visual link with that environment
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1923 Great Kantō Earthquake
The Great Kantō earthquake (関東大震災, Kantō daishinsai) struck the Kantō Plain
Kantō Plain
on the Japanese main island of Honshū
Honshū
at 11:58:44 JST (02:58:44 UTC) on Saturday, September 1, 1923. Varied accounts indicate the duration of the earthquake was between four and ten minutes.[11] The earthquake had a magnitude of 7.9 on the moment magnitude scale (Mw),[12] with its focus deep beneath Izu Ōshima
Izu Ōshima
Island in Sagami Bay
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Awaji, Hyōgo
Awaji (淡路市, Awaji-shi) is a city located on Awaji Island
Awaji Island
in Hyōgo Prefecture, Japan. The modern city of Awaji was established on April 1, 2005, from the merger of the former town of Awaji, absorbing the towns of Tsuna, Higashiura, Hokudan and Ichinomiya (all from Tsuna District). As of April 1, 2017, the city has an estimated population of 43,110 and a population density of 230 persons per km²
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Kyoto
Kyoto
Kyoto
(京都市, Kyōto-shi, pronounced [kʲoːꜜto] ( listen), pronounced [kʲoːtoꜜɕi] ( listen); UK: /kɪˈoʊtoʊ/, US: /kiˈoʊ-/, or /ˈkjoʊ-/[4]) is a city located in the central part of the island of Honshu, Japan. It has a population close to 1.5 million
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Hyōgo Prefecture
Hyōgo Prefecture
Hyōgo Prefecture
(兵庫県, Hyōgo-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kansai region
Kansai region
on
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Kobe
Kobe
Kobe
(神戸市, Kōbe-shi, Japanese: [koːꜜbe]) is the sixth-largest city in Japan
Japan
and the capital city of Hyōgo Prefecture. It is located on the southern side of the main island of Honshū, on the north shore of Osaka Bay
Osaka Bay
and about 30 km (19 mi) west of Osaka. With a population around 1.5 million, the city is part of the Keihanshin
Keihanshin
metropolitan area along with Osaka
Osaka
and Kyoto.[2] The earliest written records regarding the region come from the Nihon Shoki, which describes the founding of the Ikuta Shrine
Ikuta Shrine
by Empress Jingū in AD 201.[3][4] For most of its history, the area was never a single political entity, even during the Tokugawa period, when the port was controlled directly by the Tokugawa shogunate
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Osaka Prefecture
Osaka
Osaka
Prefecture (大阪府, Ōsaka-fu) is a prefecture located in the Kansai region
Kansai region
on Honshu, the main island of Japan.[1] The capital is the city of Osaka
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Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
Aichi Prefecture
(愛知県, Aichi-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūbu region.[1] The region of Aichi is also known as the Tōkai region. The capital is Nagoya
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Okayama Prefecture
Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture (岡山県, Okayama-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region
Chūgoku region
on the main island of Honshu.[1] The capital is the city of Okayama.[2][3][4]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Cities 2.2 Towns and villages 2.3 Mergers3 Education3.1 Universities 3.2 High schools4 Transportation4.1 Rail 4.2 Tramways 4.3 Roads4.3.1 Expressways 4.3.2 National highways4.4 Airport5 Culture5.1 Association with Momotarō
Momotarō
legend6 Sports6.1 Soccer 6.2 Volleyball7 Tourism 8 Notable people 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] See also: Historic Sites of Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture Prior to the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
of 1868, the area of present-day Okayama
Okayama
Prefecture was divided between Bitchū, Bizen and Mimasaka Provinces
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Kokoro
Kokoro
Kokoro
(こゝろ, or in post-war orthography こころ) is a novel by the Japanese author Natsume Sōseki. It was first published in 1914 in serial form in the Japanese newspaper Asahi Shinbun. While the title literally means "heart", the word contains shades of meaning, and can be translated as "the heart of things" or "feeling". The work deals with the transition from the Japanese Meiji society to the modern era, by exploring the friendship between a young man and an older man he calls "Sensei" (or teacher). It continues the theme of isolation developed in Sōseki's immediately preceding works, here in the context of interwoven strands of egoism and guilt, as opposed to shame
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Takamatsu, Kagawa
Takamatsu (高松市, Takamatsu-shi, Japanese: [takaꜜmatsɯ]) is a city located in central Kagawa Prefecture
Kagawa Prefecture
on the island of Shikoku
Shikoku
in Japan, and is the capital city of the prefectural government. It is designated a core city by the Japanese Government. It is a port city located on the Seto Inland Sea, and is the closest port to Honshu
Honshu
from Shikoku
Shikoku
island. For this reason it flourished under the daimyōs (feudal lords) as a castle town in the fiefdom of Takamatsu, during the Edo period. Takamatsu is a city with a large concentration of nationwide companies' branch offices, which play a large role in its economy, and it contains most of the national government's branch offices for Shikoku
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Wakayama
Wakayama (和歌山市, Wakayama-shi, Japanese: [ɰakaꜜjama]) is the capital city of Wakayama Prefecture
Wakayama Prefecture
in the Kansai region
Kansai region
of Japan.Contents1 Background 2 Climate 3 Transportation 4 Sightseeing spots 5 Education 6 Sister cities 7 References 8 External linksBackground[edit] The city population rose from 382,155 in 2003 to 386,501 in 2004, a growth of 1.87%. The population density as of October 1, 2010, was 1,755.47 persons per km². The total area is 209.20 km². This population increase has occurred despite Wakayama's beleaguered economy, which has suffered since Sumitomo
Sumitomo
Steel moved much of its steel producing operations to China. The Wakayama steel mills have since been reduced and restructured, with part of the industry completely shutting in 2004. Wakayama is cleft in two by the Kinokawa River
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