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Stephan Ackermann
Stephan Ackermann
Stephan Ackermann
(born March 20, 1963, in Mayen) is a German bishop. He was appointed Bishop of Trier
Bishop of Trier
(or Treves) in the Moselle
Moselle
area of Germany, in 2009.[1]Contents1 Early Life 2 Formation and Priesthood2.1 Bishop of Trier2.1.1 Child Abuse Controversy 2.1.2 Diocese Synod 2.1.3 Parish Abolishment and Clergy Role reformation Plan3 ReferencesEarly Life[edit] The son of Helmy and Hermann and the eldest of two childern, Ackermann grew up in Nickenich. His father was a church books and souvenirs merchant and met his mother when she was working as a sales assistant in the Maria Laach Abbey
Maria Laach Abbey
gift shop. He has a sister named Bärbel and is the godfather of two of her children
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Roman Catholic Diocese Of Trier
The Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
diocese of Trier, in English traditionally known by its French name of Treves, is a diocese of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Roman Catholic church in Germany.[1][2] When it was the archbishopric and Electorate of Trier, it was one of the most important states of the Holy Roman Empire, both as an ecclesiastical principality and as a diocese of the church. Unlike the other Rhenish dioceses — Mainz and Cologne, Trier was the former Roman provincial capital of Augusta Treverorum. Given its status, Trier has always been the seat of a bishop since Roman times, one of the oldest dioceses in all of Germany. The diocese was elevated to an Archdiocese in the time of Charlemagne and was the metropolitan for the dioceses of Metz, Toul, and Verdun. After the victory of Napoleon Bonaparte of France, the archdiocese was lowered to a diocese and is now a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Cologne
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Sankt Georgen Graduate School Of Philosophy And Theology
Sankt Georgen Graduate School of Philosophy and Theology (German: Philosophisch-Theologische Hochschule Sankt Georgen) is a higher education Jesuit college in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. The school offers a 10-semester Magister in Catholic Theology and a 6-semester Bachelor in Philosophy. Post-graduate students may earn the degrees of Licentiate (Lic. theol.), Doctorate (Dr. theol., Ph.D.), or Habilitation (Dr. theol. habil.)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Stefan Oster
Stefan Oster (born 3 June 1965) is a German bishop of the Roman Catholic Church who serves as the 85th Bishop of Passau.Contents1 Early life 2 Novitiate and ordination 3 Academic achievements 4 Bishop of Passau 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Oster was born on June 3, 1965 in Amberg, a town in Bavaria, Germany. He graduated from Neutraubling high school and later trained as a newspaper - and a radio editor from 1984 to 1986. He spent some years working in this profession. From 1988 he started his studies in philosophy, history and religious studies in Regensburg, Kiel, at Keele University and the University of Oxford. From 1990 to 1991 he was a Fellow in the Erasmus Programme of the European Union. He graduated from Oxford in 1993 with a Master of Studies and a Master of Arts from Regensburg in 1994. Novitiate and ordination[edit] In 1995 Oster joined the Salesians of Don Bosco and spent a year in the novitiate in Jünkerath
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Auxiliary Bishop
An auxiliary bishop is a bishop assigned to assist the diocesan bishop in meeting the pastoral and administrative needs of the diocese. Auxiliary bishops are titular bishops of sees that no longer exist. In Catholic Church, auxiliary bishops exist in both the Latin Church and in the Eastern Catholic Churches. The particular duties of an auxiliary bishop are given by the diocesan bishop and can vary widely depending on the auxiliary bishop, the ordinary, and the needs of the diocese. In a larger archdiocese, they might be in assigned to serve a portion of the archdiocese (sometimes called deaneries, regions, or vicariates) or to serve a particular population such as immigrants or those of a particular heritage or language
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Holy See
The Holy See
Holy See
(Italian: Santa Sede; Latin: Sancta Sedes; Ecclesiastical Latin: [ˈsaŋkta ˈsedes]), also referred to as the See of Rome, is the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Rome, the episcopal see of the Pope, and an independent sovereign entity. It serves as the central point of reference for the Catholic Church everywhere and the focal point of communion due to its position as the pre-eminent episcopal see of the universal church. Today, it is responsible for the governance of all Catholics, organised in their Particular Churches, Patriarchates and religious institutes. As an independent sovereign entity, holding the Vatican City
Vatican City
enclave in Rome
Rome
as an independent state, it maintains diplomatic relations with other states
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Church Dogmatics
Church Dogmatics
Church Dogmatics
(German: Kirchliche Dogmatik) is the fourteen-volume magnum opus of Swiss Protestant theologian Karl Barth, which was published in stages from 1932 to 1967.Contents1 Academic significance 2 Method 3 Content 4 Scope 5 Notes 6 External linksAcademic significance[edit] Widely regarded as one of the most important theological works of the century, it represents the pinnacle of Barth's achievement as a theologian. Barth published the first part-volume of the Dogmatics in 1932 and continued working on it until his death in 1968, by which time it was 6 million words long in thirteen part-volumes. Method[edit] Highly contextual, the volumes are written chronologically, beginning with Vol. I/1. Each volume reacts (in part) to a number of influences: concurrent political issues, questions raised by his students after lectures, and refutations of other academic Christians with opposing views
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Ecclesiastical University
An ecclesiastical university is a special type of higher education school recognised by the Canon law of the Catholic Church. It is one of two types of universities recognised, the other type being the Catholic university
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Pontifical Gregorian University
The Pontifical Gregorian University
Pontifical Gregorian University
(Italian: Pontificia Università Gregoriana; also known as the Gregoriana) is a higher education ecclesiastical school (pontifical university) located in Rome, Italy. It was originally a part of the Roman College
Roman College
founded in 1551 by Saint Ignatius of Loyola,[2] and included all grades of schooling. The university division of philosophy and theology of the Roman College was given Papal approval in 1556, making it the first university founded by the Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(Jesuits). In 1584 the Roman College was given a grandiose new home by Pope Gregory XIII, after whom it was renamed.[3] It was already making its mark not only in sacred but also in natural science. Only the theology and philosophy departments survived the political turmoil in Italy
Italy
after 1870
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Roman Catholic
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Roman Catholic Diocese Of Münster
The Diocese
Diocese
of Münster is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in Germany.[1][2] It is a suffragan diocese of the Archdiocese of Cologne. Bishop Felix Genn is the current Bishop of the Diocese
Diocese
of Münster. He was ordained to the priesthood on July 11, 1976 and was appointed to the See of Münster on December 19, 2008.Contents1 Statistics 2 History 3 Ordinaries3.1 Bishops till 1181 3.2 Prince-Bishops 3.3 Bishops since 1820 3.4 Auxiliary bishops4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 External linksStatistics[edit] As of 31 Dec. 2006, with 4.336 million adherents or 47.1% of local population, nearly half the inhabitants of the Münster diocese were Roman Catholic; due to continuing securalisation, this a decreased percentage compared to earlier periods. Sunday mass attendance reflects this decline over the course of three decades
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Andernach
Andernach
Andernach
(German pronunciation: [ˈandɐˌnax]) is a town in the district of Mayen-Koblenz, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, of currently[when?] about 30,000 inhabitants. It is situated towards the end of the Neuwied
Neuwied
basin on the left bank of the Rhine
Rhine
between the former tiny fishing village of Fornich in the north and the mouth of the small river Nette in the southeast, just 13 miles (21 km) north of Koblenz, with its five external town districts: Kell, Miesenheim, Eich, Namedy, and Bad Tönisstein. A few hundred metres downstream of Andernach
Andernach
the Rhine
Rhine
valley narrows from both sides forming the northern part of the romantic Middle Rhine
Rhine
stretch. Already in Roman times the place the narrow passage begins was named "Porta Antunnacensis" or Andernachian Gate
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