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St Mary Le Bow
St Mary-le-Bow
St Mary-le-Bow
/sənt ˈmɛəri lə ˈboʊ/ is a historic church rebuilt after the Great Fire of 1666
Great Fire of 1666
by Sir
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Marylebone
Marylebone
Marylebone
(/ˈmærɪləbən/ or /ˈmærələbən/[1], both appropriate for the Parish Church of St. Marylebone, /ˈmærɪbən/, /ˈmɑːrlɪbən/, or /ˈmærɪlɪboʊn/[2]) is an affluent inner-city area of central London, England, located within the City of Westminster
Westminster
and part of the West End
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Crown Steeple
A crown steeple, or crown spire, is a traditional form of church steeple in which curved stone flying buttresses form the open shape of a rounded crown. It appeared in medieval church architecture in England and Scotland, and reappeared in the 19th century as part of the Gothic Revival.Contents1 Medieval crown spires 2 Gothic Revival
Gothic Revival
crown steeples 3 Modern versions 4 ReferencesMedieval crown spires[edit] The crown steeple on Newcastle Cathedral, in Newcastle upon Tyne, was erected in 1448 and is possibly the earliest example of this form of steeple.[citation needed] The crown spire of St
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Charing Cross
Charing Cross
Charing Cross
(/ˌtʃærɪŋ ˈkrɒs/)[1] denotes the junction of Strand, Whitehall
Whitehall
and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square in central London. It gives its name to several landmarks, including Charing Cross
Charing Cross
railway station, one of the main London rail terminals. Charing Cross
Charing Cross
is named after the Eleanor cross
Eleanor cross
that stood on the site, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. The site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I
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London Stone
London Stone
London Stone
is a historic landmark traditionally housed at 111 Cannon Street in the City of London. It is an irregular block of oolitic limestone measuring 53 × 43 × 30 cm (21 × 17 × 12"), the remnant of a once much larger object that had stood for many centuries on the south side of the street. Currently the stone is housed at the Museum of London
Museum of London
pending reconstruction of the 111 Cannon Street building.[1] The name "London Stone" was first recorded around the year 1100. The date and original purpose of the Stone are unknown, although it is possibly of Roman origin, and there has been interest and speculation about it since at least the 16th century. There are modern claims that it was formerly an object of veneration, or has some occult significance
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Cannon Street
Cannon Street
Cannon Street
is a road in the City of London, the historic nucleus of London and its modern financial centre. It runs roughly parallel with the River Thames, about 250 metres (820 ft) north of it, in the south of the City. It is the site of the ancient London Stone
London Stone
and gave its name to Cannon Street station, a mainline railway terminus and connected London Underground station.Contents1 Etymology 2 Overview 3 Transport links 4 References 5 Further readingEtymology[edit] The area around Cannon Street
Cannon Street
was initially the place of residence of the candle-makers
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Lewes
Lewes
Lewes
/ˈluːɪs/ is the county town of East Sussex
East Sussex
and formerly all of Sussex. It is a civil parish and is the centre of the Lewes
Lewes
local government district. Its population is now around 17 thousand. The settlement is a traditional market town and centre of communications and in 1264, it was the site of the Battle of Lewes. The town's landmarks including Lewes Castle
Lewes Castle
and a 15th-century bookshop
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Rebus
A rebus (/ˈriːbəs/) is an allusional device that uses pictures to represent words or parts of words. It was a favourite form of heraldic expression used in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to denote surnames. For example, in its basic form, three salmon (fish) are used to denote the surname "Salmon"
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Woodcut Map Of London
The "Woodcut" map of London, formally titled Civitas Londinum, and often referred to as the "Agas" map of London, is one of the earliest true maps (as opposed to panoramic views, such as those of Anton van den Wyngaerde) of the City of London
City of London
and its environs. The original map probably dated from the early 1560s, but it survives only in later and slightly modified copies. It was printed from woodcut blocks on eight sheets, and in its present state measures approximately 2 feet 4 inches (71 cm) high by 6 feet (180 cm) wide. (There has been some damage to the blocks, and it was probably originally fractionally larger.)[1] The Woodcut
Woodcut
map is a slightly smaller-scale, cruder and lightly modified copy of the so-called "Copperplate" map, surveyed between 1553 and 1559, which, however, survives only in part
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Saxon
The Saxons
Saxons
(Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson, Low German: Sassen) were a group of Germanic tribes first mentioned as living near the North Sea
North Sea
coast of what is now Germany
Germany
(Old Saxony), in the late Roman Empire. They were soon mentioned as raiding and settling in many North Sea
North Sea
areas, as well as pushing south inland towards the Franks
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London Tornado Of 1091
The London
London
Tornado
Tornado
of 1091 is reckoned by modern assessment of the reports as possibly a T8 tornado (roughly equal to an F4 tornado) which occurred in London
London
in the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
and was the earliest reported tornado in that area, occurring on Friday, 17 October 1091.[1] The wooden London
London
Bridge was demolished, and the church of St. Mary-le-Bow
St. Mary-le-Bow
in the city of London
London
was badly damaged; four rafters 26 feet (7.9 m) long were driven into the ground with such force that only 4 feet (1.2 m) protruded above the surface. Other churches in the area were demolished, as were over 600 (mostly wooden) houses
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Tornado
A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth
Earth
and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. They are often referred to as twisters, whirlwinds or cyclones,[1] although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern.[2] Tornadoes
Tornadoes
come in many shapes and sizes, and they are often visible in the form of a condensation funnel originating from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud, with a cloud of rotating debris and dust beneath it. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 miles per hour (180 km/h), are about 250 feet (80 m) across, and travel a few miles (several kilometers) before dissipating
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John Stow
John Stow
John Stow
(also Stowe; 1524/25 – 5 April 1605) was an English historian and antiquarian, best known for his Survey of London (1598; second edition 1603).Contents1 Life 2 Works2.1 Survey of London3 Later years and death 4 Commemoration 5 References5.1 Edition 5.2 Further reading6 External linksLife[edit] John Stow
John Stow
was born in about 1525 in the City parish of St Michael, Cornhill, then at the heart of London's metropolis. His father, Thomas Stow, was a tallow chandler. Thomas Stow is recorded as paying rent of 6s 8d per year for the family dwelling, and as a youth Stow would fetch milk every morning from a farm on the land nearby to the east owned by the Minoresses of the Convent of St
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Caen Stone
Caen
Caen
stone (French: Pierre de Caen), is a light creamy-yellow Jurassic limestone quarried in north-western France near the city of Caen. The limestone is a fine grained oolitic limestone formed in shallow water lagoons in the Bathonian
Bathonian
Age about 167 million years ago. The stone is homogeneous, and therefore suitable for carving.Contents1 Use in building1.1 Notable examples2 See also 3 ReferencesUse in building[edit] The stone was first used for building in the Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
period with production from open cast quarries restarting in the 11th century. Shipped to England, Canterbury Cathedral, Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
and the Tower of London
Tower of London
were all partially built from Caen
Caen
stone
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Robert Greene (dramatist)
Robert Greene (baptised 11 July 1558, died 3 September 1592) was an English author popular in his day, and now best known for a posthumous pamphlet attributed to him, Greenes, Groats-worth of Witte, bought with a million of Repentance, widely believed to contain an attack on William Shakespeare. Robert Greene was a popular Elizabethan dramatist and pamphleteer known for his negative critiques of his colleagues. He is said to have been born in Norwich.[1] He attended Cambridge, receiving a BA in 1580, and an M.A. in 1583 before moving to London, where he arguably became the first professional author in England. Greene was prolific and published in many genres including romances, plays and autobiography.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Writing 4 Greene and Shakespeare 5 Prose works 6 Verse 7 Plays 8 In popular culture 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksFamily[edit] According to Richardson,'The chief problem in compiling a biography of Robert Greene is the name
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Roof Lantern
A roof lantern is a daylighting architectural element. Architectural lanterns are atop a larger roof and provide natural light into the space or room below. In contemporary use it is an architectural skylight structure. The term 'roof top lantern' is used to describe the lighted decorative lanterns atop taxi cabs in Japan, designed to reflect the cultural heritage of Japanese paper lanterns.Contents1 History 2 Present day 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The glazed lantern was developed during the Middle Ages. Roof lanterns of masonry and glass were used in Renaissance architecture, such as in principal cathedrals
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