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Sri Lanka Navy
The Sri Lankan Navy
Navy
(Sinhala: ශ්‍රී ලංකා නාවික හමුදාව Shri Lankā Nāvika Hamudāva; Tamil: இலங்கை கடற்படை Ilaṅkai Kaṭaṟpaṭai) is the navy of the Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
Armed Forces and is classed as the most vital defence force of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
due to the country's island geography. It is responsible for the maritime defence of the Sri Lankan nation and its interests. Sri Lanka, situated in the middle of major sea lanes passing through the Indian Ocean, was always a magnet for seafarers and has a long history of naval campaigns. The current Sri Lankan Navy
Navy
was established on 9 December 1950 when the Navy
Navy
Act was passed for the formation of the Royal Ceylon Navy
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Sloop
A sloop (from Dutch sloep, in turn from French chaloupe) is a sailing boat with a single mast and a fore-and-aft rig. A sloop has only one head-sail; if a vessel has two or more head-sails, the term cutter is used, and its mast may be set further aft than on a sloop. The most common rig of modern sailboats is the Bermuda-rigged sloop. Typically, a modern sloop carries a mainsail on a boom aft of the mast, with a single loose-footed head-sail (a jib or a genoa) forward of the mast.Contents1 Masthead vs. fractional rigging 2 Rationale behind the sloop rig 3 Sails carried3.1 The Bermuda
Bermuda
sloop 3.2 Jamaican sloop 3.3 Historic naval definition 3.4 Modern naval definition 3.5 Modern civilian connotation4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksMasthead vs. fractional rigging[edit]A masthead-rigged UFO 34Sloops are either masthead-rigged or fractional-rigged
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Indian Ocean
The Indian Ocean
Ocean
is the third largest of the world's oceanic divisions, covering 70,560,000 km2 (27,240,000 sq mi) (approximately 20% of the water on the Earth's surface).[1] It is bounded by Asia
Asia
on the north, on the west by Africa, on the east by Australia, and on the south by the
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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Tamil Language
 Sri Lanka  Singapore  India:Tamil Nadu[3] Puducherry[4] Andaman & Nicobar Islands[5]Recognised minority language in Malaysia[6]  Mauritius[7]  South Africa[8]Language codesISO 639-1 taISO 639-2 tamISO 639-3 Variously: tam – Modern Tamil oty – Old Tamil ptq – Pattapu BhashaiLinguist Listoty Old TamilGlottolog tamil1289  Modern Tamil[9] oldt1248  Old Tamil[10]Linguasphere 49-EBE-aThis article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.This article contains Indic text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks or boxes, misplaced vowels or missing conjuncts instead of Indic text.Tamil is written in a non-Latin script
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Sinhalese Language
Sinhalese (/ˌsɪn(h)əˈliːz, ˌsɪŋ(ɡ)ə-/), known natively as Sinhala (Sinhalese: සිංහල; siṁhala [ˈsiŋɦələ]),[3] is the native language of the Sinhalese people, who make up the largest ethnic group in Sri Lanka, numbering about 16 million.[4][5][6] Sinhalese is also spoken as a second language by other ethnic groups in Sri Lanka, totalling about four million.[7] It belongs to the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European languages.[5] Sinhalese is written using the Sinhalese script, which is one of the Brahmic scripts, a descendant of the ancient Indian Brahmi script
Brahmi script<

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Asymmetric Warfare
Asymmetric warfare
Asymmetric warfare
(or asymmetric engagement) is war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ significantly. This is typically a war between a standing, professional army and an insurgency or resistance movement. Asymmetric warfare
Asymmetric warfare
can describe a conflict in which the resources of two belligerents differ in essence and in the struggle, interact and attempt to exploit each other's characteristic weaknesses
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Counter-insurgency
A counter-insurgency or counterinsurgency[1] (COIN) can be defined as "comprehensive civilian and military efforts taken to simultaneously defeat and contain insurgency and address its root causes".[2] An insurgency is a rebellion against a constituted authority when those taking part in the rebellion are not recognized as belligerents.[3] It isthe organized use of subversion and violence to seize, nullify or challenge political control of a region. As such, it is primarily a political struggle, in which both sides use armed force to create space for their political, economic and influence activities to be effective.[2] Counter-insurgency
Counter-insurgency
campaigns of duly-elected or politically recognized governments take place during war, occupation by a foreign military or police force, and when internal conflicts that involve subversion and armed rebellion occur
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Navy
A navy or maritime force is the branch of a nation's armed forces principally designated for naval and amphibious warfare; namely, lake-borne, riverine, littoral, or ocean-borne combat operations and related functions. It includes anything conducted by surface ships, amphibious ships, submarines, and seaborne aviation, as well as ancillary support, communications, training, and other fields. The strategic offensive role of a navy is projection of force into areas beyond a country's shores (for example, to protect sea-lanes, ferry troops, or attack other navies, ports, or shore installations). The strategic defensive purpose of a navy is to frustrate seaborne projection-of-force by enemies. The strategic task of the navy also may incorporate nuclear deterrence by use of submarine-launched ballistic missiles
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Littoral Zone
The littoral zone is the part of a sea, lake or river that is close to the shore. In coastal environments the littoral zone extends from the high water mark, which is rarely inundated, to shoreline areas that are permanently submerged. It always includes this intertidal zone and is often used to mean the same as the intertidal zone. However, the meaning of "littoral zone" can extend well beyond the intertidal zone. There is no single definition. What is regarded as the full extent of the littoral zone, and the way the littoral zone is divided into subregions, varies in different contexts (lakes and rivers have their own definitions). The use of the term also varies from one part of the world to another, and between different disciplines. For example, military commanders speak of the littoral in ways that are quite different from marine biologists. The adjacency of water gives a number of distinctive characteristics to littoral regions
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Special Forces
Special
Special
forces and special operations forces are military units trained to conduct special operations.[1][2][3] NATO
NATO
defines special operations as "military activities conducted by specially designated, organized, trained, and equipped forces, manned with selected personnel, using unconventional tactics, techniques, and modes of employment".[1][4] Special
Special
forces emerged in the early 20th century, with a significant growth in the field during the Second World War, when "every major army involved in the fighting" created formations devoted to special operations behind enemy lines.[5] Depending on the country, special forces may perform some of the following functions: airborne operations, counter-insurgency, counter-terrorism, foreign internal defense, covert ops, direct action, hostage rescue, high-value targets/manhunting, intelligence operations, mobility operations, and unconventional warfare
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Commander-in-chief
A commander-in-chief, also sometimes called supreme commander, or chief commander, is the person or body that exercises supreme operational command and control of a nation's military forces. As a technical term, it refers to military competencies that reside in a nation-state's executive leadership—a head of state, a head of government . Often, a given country's commander-in-chief (if held by an official) need not be or have been a commissioned officer or even a veteran
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Missile Boat
A missile boat or missile cutter is a small fast warship armed with anti-ship missiles. Being smaller than other warships such as destroyers and frigates, missile boats are popular with nations interested in forming a navy at lower cost. They are similar in concept to the torpedo boats of World War II; in fact, the first missile boats were modified torpedo boats with the torpedo tubes replaced by missile tubes. The doctrine behind the use of missile boats is based on the principle of mobility over defence and firepower. The advent of proper guided missile and electronic countermeasure technologies gave birth to the idea that warships could now be designed to outmaneuver their enemies and conceal themselves while carrying powerful weapons. Previously, increasing the potency of naval artillery required larger projectiles, which required larger and heavier guns, which in turn called for larger ships to carry these guns and their ammunition and absorb their recoil
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Killed In Action
Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces.[1] The United States
United States
Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs do not come from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events. Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility
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Fast Attack Craft
A fast attack craft (FAC) is a small, fast, agile and offensive warship armed with anti-ship missiles, gun or torpedoes. FACs are usually operated in close proximity to land as they lack both the seakeeping and all-round defensive capabilities to survive in blue water. The size of the vessel also limits the fuel, stores and water supplies. In size they are usually between 50–800 tonnes and can reach speeds of 25–50 knots.[1] A fast attack craft's main advantage over other warship types is its affordability. Many FACs can be deployed at a relatively low cost, allowing a navy which is at a disadvantage to effectively defend itself against a larger adversary.[2] A small boat, when equipped with the same weapons as its larger counterpart, can pose a serious threat to even the largest of capital ships
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Sea Lane
A sea lane, sea road or shipping lane is a regularly used route for vessels on oceans and large lakes. In the Age of Sail
Age of Sail
they were not only determined by the distribution of land masses but also the prevailing winds, whose discovery was crucial for the success of long voyages. Sea lanes are very important for trade by sea.Contents1 History 2 Advantages 3 Threats from shipping lanes 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit]The westerlies and trade windsThe ocean currentsMain article: Wind § Global_climatology The establishment of the North Atlantic sea lanes was inspired by the sinking of the US mail steamer SS Arctic
SS Arctic
by collision with the French steamer SS Vesta in October 1854 which resulted in the loss of over 300 lives. Lieutenant M. F. Maury of the US Navy first published a section titled "Steam Lanes Across the Atlantic" in his 1855 Sailing Directions proposing sea lanes along the 42 degree latitude
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