HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Sheet Music
Sheet music
Sheet music
is a handwritten or printed form of music notation that uses modern musical symbols to indicate the pitches (melodies), rhythms or chords of a song or instrumental musical piece
[...More...]

"Sheet Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

TV Show
A television show is a series of related productions intended for broadcast on over-the-air, cable television or Internet television, other than a commercial, trailer or any other segment of content not serving as attraction for viewership. More rarely, it may be a single production, also called a television program (British English: programme). A limited number of episodes of a television show may be called a miniseries or a serial or limited series. A television series is without a fixed length and are usually divided into seasons (U.S. and Canada) or series (UK), yearly or semiannual sets of new episodes. While there is no defined length, U.S. industry practice has traditionally favored longer television seasons than those of other countries. A one-time broadcast may be called a "special" or particularly in the UK a "special episode"
[...More...]

"TV Show" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Traditional Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
[...More...]

"Traditional Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compact Cassette
The Compact Audio Cassette (CAC) or Musicassette (MC), also commonly called the cassette tape or simply tape or cassette, is an analog magnetic tape recording format for audio recording and playback. It was released by Philips
Philips
in 1963, having been developed in Hasselt, Belgium.[2] Compact cassettes come in two forms, either already containing content as a prerecorded cassette, or as a fully recordable "blank" cassette. Both forms are reversible by the user.[3] The compact cassette technology was originally designed for dictation machines, but improvements in fidelity led the Compact Cassette
Compact Cassette
to supplant the Stereo 8-track cartridge
8-track cartridge
and reel-to-reel tape recording in most non-professional applications.[4] Its uses ranged from portable audio to home recording to data storage for early microcomputers
[...More...]

"Compact Cassette" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Compact Disc
Compact disc
Compact disc
(CD) is a digital optical disc data storage format that was co-developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
and released in 1982. The format was originally developed to store and play only sound recordings but was later adapted for storage of data (CD-ROM). Several other formats were further derived from these, including write-once audio and data storage (CD-R), rewritable media (CD-RW), Video Compact Disc (VCD), Super Video Compact Disc (SVCD), Photo CD, PictureCD, CD-i, and Enhanced Music CD. The first commercially available Audio CD player, the Sony
Sony
CDP-101, was released October 1982 in Japan. Standard CDs have a diameter of 120 millimetres (4.7 in) and can hold up to about 80 minutes of uncompressed audio or about 700  MiB of data
[...More...]

"Compact Disc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bluegrass Music
Bluegrass music
Bluegrass music
is a form of American roots music, and is defined by its unique homage to America and its various cultural influences that truly define America. Influenced by the music of Appalachia,[1] bluegrass has mixed roots in Irish, Scottish and English[2] traditional music, and was also later influenced by the music of African-Americans[3] through incorporation of jazz elements. Settlers from Britain and Ireland arrived in Appalachia
Appalachia
during the 18th century, and brought with them the musical traditions of their homelands.[4] These traditions consisted primarily of English and Scottish ballads—which were essentially unaccompanied narrative—and dance music, such as Irish reels, which were accompanied by a fiddle.[5] Many older bluegrass songs come directly from the British Isles
[...More...]

"Bluegrass Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Melody
A melody (from Greek μελῳδία, melōidía, "singing, chanting"),[1] also tune, voice, or line, is a linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm, while more figuratively, the term can include successions of other musical elements such as tonal color. It may be considered the foreground to the background accompaniment. A line or part need not be a foreground melody. Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases or motifs, and are usually repeated throughout a composition in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjunct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence, and shape.The true goal of music—its proper enterprise—is melody
[...More...]

"Melody" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
[...More...]

"Printing Press" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Musical Ensemble
A musical ensemble, also known as a music group or musical group, is a group of people who perform instrumental or vocal music, with the ensemble typically known by a distinct name. Some music ensembles consist solely of instruments, such as the jazz quartet or the orchestra. Some music ensembles consist solely of singers, such as choirs and doo wop groups. In both popular music and classical music, there are ensembles in which both instrumentalists and singers perform, such as the rock band or the Baroque chamber group for basso continuo (harpsichord and cello) and one or more singers. In classical music, trios or quartets either blend the sounds of musical instrument families (such as piano, strings, and wind instruments) or group together instruments from the same instrument family, such as string ensembles (e.g., string quartet) or wind ensembles (e.g., wind quintet)
[...More...]

"Musical Ensemble" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Play (theatre)
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading. Plays are performed at a variety of levels, from Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, to Community theatre, as well as university or school productions. There are rare dramatists, notably George Bernard Shaw, who have had little preference as to whether their plays were performed or read
[...More...]

"Play (theatre)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sound Recording
Sound
Sound
recording and reproduction is an electrical, mechanical, electronic, or digital inscription and re-creation of sound waves, such as spoken voice, singing, instrumental music, or sound effects. The two main classes of sound recording technology are analog recording and digital recording. Acoustic analog recording is achieved by a microphone diaphragm that senses changes in atmospheric pressure caused by acoustic sound waves and records them as a mechanical representation of the sound waves on a medium such as a phonograph record (in which a stylus cuts grooves on a record). In magnetic tape recording, the sound waves vibrate the microphone diaphragm and are converted into a varying electric current, which is then converted to a varying magnetic field by an electromagnet, which makes a representation of the sound as magnetized areas on a plastic tape with a magnetic coating on it
[...More...]

"Sound Recording" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ballet
Ballet
Ballet
/ˈbæleɪ/ (French: [balɛ]) is a type of performance dance that originated during the Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
in the 15th century and later developed into a concert dance form in France and Russia. It has since become a widespread, highly technical form of dance with its own vocabulary based on French terminology. It has been globally influential and has defined the foundational techniques used in many other dance genres and cultures. Ballet
Ballet
has been taught in various schools around the world, which have historically incorporated their own cultures to evolve the art. See glossary of ballet. A ballet, a work, consists of the choreography and music for a ballet production
[...More...]

"Ballet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Television Program
A television show is a series of related productions intended for broadcast on over-the-air, cable television or Internet television, other than a commercial, trailer or any other segment of content not serving as attraction for viewership. More rarely, it may be a single production, also called a television program (British English: programme). A limited number of episodes of a television show may be called a miniseries or a serial or limited series. A television series is without a fixed length and are usually divided into seasons (U.S. and Canada) or series (UK), yearly or semiannual sets of new episodes. While there is no defined length, U.S. industry practice has traditionally favored longer television seasons than those of other countries. A one-time broadcast may be called a "special" or particularly in the UK a "special episode"
[...More...]

"Television Program" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Béatrice Et Bénédict
Béatrice et Bénédict
Béatrice et Bénédict
(Beatrice and Benedick) is an opéra comique in two acts by Hector Berlioz.[1] Berlioz wrote the French libretto himself, based closely on Shakespeare's Much Ado
Much Ado
About Nothing. Berlioz had been interested in setting Shakespeare's comedy since his return from Italy in 1833, but only composed the score of Béatrice et Bénédict following the completion of Les Troyens
Les Troyens
in 1858
[...More...]

"Béatrice Et Bénédict" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Title Page
The title page of a book, thesis or other written work is the page at or near the front which displays its title, subtitle, author, publisher, and edition
[...More...]

"Title Page" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Songwriter
A songwriter is a professional who is paid to write lyrics for singers and melodies for songs, typically for a popular music genre such as rock or country music. A songwriter can also be called a composer, although the latter term tends to be used mainly for individuals from the classical music genre. The pressure from the music industry to produce popular hits means that songwriting is often an activity for which the tasks are distributed between a number of people.[1] For example, a songwriter who excels at writing lyrics might be paired with a songwriter with the task of creating original melodies
[...More...]

"Songwriter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.