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Sexualization In Child Beauty Pageants
A child beauty pageant is a beauty contest where contestants are usually under 16 years of age. There does not appear to be reliable statistics about the number of these pageants held each year around the world. They vary in style, and categories may include a talent segment as well as costume and theme wear. Contestants often wear makeup, fake teeth, false eyelashes, lipstick, elaborate hairstyles with hair extensions, and specially designed, sometimes provocative, outfits. Spray tanning and waxing are also common.[1][2] Contestants compete for prizes and are judged on the way they look and how they act on stage, similar to the judgment criteria in adult beauty pageants. The way that the children look is clearly artificial and often detracts from their natural appearances
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Showmanship (performing)
Showmanship, concerning artistic performing such as in Theatre, is the skill of performing in such a manner that will appeal to an audience or aid in conveying the performance's essential theme or message. For instance, the Canadian stage magician Doug Henning
Doug Henning
used many classic illusions in his magic show. However, he made the old material seem new by rejecting the old stylistic cliches of the art (such as wearing formal wear), and by presenting them with a childlike exuberance that respected the audience's intelligence. Profitable showmanship frequently appeals to pathos. Showmen aim to display goods with tact in order to sell an object or a show.[1] Companies producing drama and entertainment claim that displaying fairness is necessary.[2] Notes[edit]^ Goode, Kenneth (2008-10-01). Profitable Showmanship. Read Books. ISBN 9781443745628.  ^ "Summit SFU's Institutional Repository" (PDF)
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Eyelash Extensions
Eyelash extensions are used to enhance the length, curliness, fullness, and thickness of natural eyelashes. The extensions may be made from several materials including mink, synthetic, or horse hair. The main method of applying the extensions on is by using an adhesive glue to individually sticking them to the eyelashes one-by-one. This is to prevent the eyelashes from sticking together. False eyelashes and eyelash extensions are not the same.Contents1 History 2 Types of lashes2.1 Temporary false lashes 2.2 Semi-permanent lashes3 Process 4 Training and certification 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In 1879, James D. McCabe wrote The National Encyclopædia of Business and Social Forms, where, in the section "Laws of Etiquette," he stated that eyelashes could be lengthened by cutting the ends with a pair of scissors
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Patrice Oppliger
Patrice A. Oppliger (born 26 August 1963),[1] is the assistant professor of communication at Boston University College of Communication.[2] Oppliger has written extensively about the impact of popular culture on student's high school years, and has been consulted by the media on the subject. Interviewed by CNN
CNN
about cyberbullying, Oppliger discussed the film "Mean Girls", which is based on the book "Queen Bees and Wannabes" by Rosalind Wiseman. Oppliger accused the film of "glamorizing bad behavior", she went on to say that, "The book is a helpful guide to relationships between girls; the movie, on the other hand, showed the positive side of being a mean girl."[3] WFXT
WFXT
Fox25 News also interviewed Oppliger about Rockport High School's decision to ban female students from wearing yoga pants
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Vogue Paris
The French edition of Vogue magazine, Vogue Paris, is a fashion magazine that has been published since 1920.Contents1 1920–54 2 Under Edmonde Charles-Roux
Edmonde Charles-Roux
(1954–66) 3 1968-2000: Crescent, Pringle, and Buck 4 Under Carine Roitfeld (2001–2011) 5 Under
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Vanity
Vanity
Vanity
is the excessive belief in one's own abilities or attractiveness to others. Prior to the 14th century it did not have such narcissistic undertones, and merely meant futility.[2] The related term vainglory is now often seen as an archaic synonym for vanity, but originally meant boasting in vain, i.e
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Cosmetics
Cosmetics
Cosmetics
are substances or products used to enhance or alter the appearance or fragrance of the body. Many cosmetics are designed for use of applying to the face and hair. They are generally mixtures of chemical compounds; some being derived from natural sources (such as coconut oil), and some being synthetics.[1] Common cosmetics include lipstick, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, rouge, skin cleansers and skin lotions, shampoo, hairstyling products (gel, hair spray, etc.), perfume and cologne. Cosmetics
Cosmetics
applied to the face to enhance its appearance are often called make-up or makeup. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA), which regulates cosmetics,[2] defines cosmetics as "intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions"
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Costumes
Costume
Costume
is the distinctive style of dress of an individual or group that reflects their class, gender, profession, ethnicity, nationality, activity or epoch. The term also was traditionally used to describe typical appropriate clothing for certain activities, such as riding costume, swimming costume, dance costume, and evening costume
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Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia nervosa, also known as simply bulimia, is an eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by purging.[2] Binge eating refers to eating a large amount of food in a short amount of time.[2] Purging refers to the attempts to get rid of the food consumed.[2] This may be done by vomiting or taking laxatives.[2] Other efforts to lose weight may include the use of diuretics, stimulants, water fasting, or excessive exercise.[2][4] Most people with bulimia are at a normal weight.[1] The forcing of vomiting may result in thickened skin on the knuckles and breakdown of the teeth.[2] Bulimia is frequently associated with other mental disorders such as depression, anxiety, and problems with drugs or alcohol.[2] There is also a higher risk of suicide and self-harm.[3] Bulimia is more common among those who have a close relative with the condition.[2] The percentage risk that is estimated to be due to genetics is between 30% and 80%.[4] Other risk factors for the disease include psy
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Anorexia Nervosa
Anorexia nervosa, often referred to simply as anorexia,[11] is an eating disorder characterized by low weight, fear of gaining weight, and a strong desire to be thin, resulting in food restriction.[1] Many people with anorexia see themselves as overweight even though they are in fact underweight.[1][2] If asked they usually deny they have a problem with low weight.[3] Often they weigh themselves frequently, eat only small amounts, and only eat certain foods.[1] Some will exercise excessively, force themselves to vomit, or use laxatives to produce weight loss.[1] Complications may include osteoporosis, infertility and heart damage, among others.[1] Women will often stop having menstrual periods.[3] The cause is not known.[2] There appear to be some genetic components with identical twins more often affected than non-identical twins.[2] Cultural factors also appear to play a role with societies that value thinness having higher rates of disease.[3] Additionally, it occurs more commonly a
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Eating Disorder
An eating disorder is a mental disorder defined by abnormal eating habits that negatively affect a person's physical or mental health.[1] They include binge eating disorder where people eat a large amount in a short period of time, anorexia nervosa where people eat very little and thus have a low body weight, bulimia nervosa where people eat a lot and then try to rid themselves of the food, pica where people eat non-food items, rumination disorder where people regurgitate food, avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder where people have a lack of interest in food, and a group of other specified feeding or eating disorders.[1] Anxiety disorders, depression, and substance abuse are common among people with eating disorders.[2] These disorders do not include obesity.[1] The cause of eating disorders is not clear.[3] Both biological and environmental factors appear to play a role.[2][3] Cultural idealization of thinness is believed to contribute.[3] Eating disorders affect about 12 percent
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Psychological
Psychology
Psychology
is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as thought. It is an academic discipline of immense scope and diverse interests that, when taken together, seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of epiphenomena they manifest. As a social science it aims to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific cases.[1][2] In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist
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University Of Kentucky
Coordinates: 38°02′N 84°30′W / 38.033°N 84.500°W / 38.033; -84.500 University
University
of KentuckyLatin: Universitas KentuckiensisMotto United We Stand, Divided We FallType Flagship Public Land-grantEstablished 1865Academic affiliationsAPLU ORAU SURAEndowment $1.28 billion (2017)[1]President Eli CapiloutoProvost David W
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Dress-up
Dress-up is a game played mainly by children. It involves dressing up, usually to impersonate someone or something, like an animal or character in a fairy tale. The type of clothes they dress up in often resembles who they are trying to be, either adults' clothing or special play clothes designed specifically for dress-up like feather boas and jewelry. More and more tweens are taking to the internet to talk with friends, shop and play games. In recent years, the most popular girls games have been dress up and fashion games which allow girls to dress and customize virtual dolls, go shopping and complete challenges
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.