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Saturn Vue
The Saturn VUE is a compact SUV
SUV
that was sold and built by Saturn, and it was Saturn's best-selling model. It was the first vehicle to use the GM Theta platform
GM Theta platform
when it was introduced in 2001 for the 2002 model year. The VUE was later facelifted for the 2006 model year. A second generation model was launched in 2007 for the 2008 model year as a rebadged Opel
Opel
Antara
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Liter
The litre (SI spelling) or liter (American spelling) (symbols L or l,[1] sometimes abbreviated ltr) is an SI accepted metric system unit of volume equal to 1 cubic decimetre (dm3), 1,000 cubic centimetres (cm3) or 1/1,000 cubic metre. A cubic decimetre (or litre) occupies a volume of 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm (see figure) and is thus equal to one-thousandth of a cubic metre. The original French metric system used the litre as a base unit. The word litre is derived from an older French unit, the litron, whose name came from Greek — where it was a unit of weight, not volume [2] — via Latin, and which equalled approximately 0.831 litres. The litre was also used in several subsequent versions of the metric system and is accepted for use with the SI,[3] although not an SI unit — the SI unit of volume is the cubic metre (m3)
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Automatic Transmission
An automatic transmission, also called auto, self-shifting transmission, n-speed automatic (where n is its number of forward gear ratios), or AT, is a type of motor vehicle transmission that can automatically change gear ratios as the vehicle moves, freeing the driver from having to shift gears manually. Like other transmission systems on vehicles, it allows an internal combustion engine, best suited to run at a relatively high rotational speed, to provide a range of speed and torque outputs necessary for vehicular travel. The number of forward gear ratios is often expressed for manual transmissions as well (e.g., 6-speed manual). The most popular form found in automobiles is the hydraulic automatic transmission. Similar but larger devices are also used for heavy-duty commercial and industrial vehicles and equipment. This system uses a fluid coupling in place of a friction clutch, and accomplishes gear changes by hydraulically locking and unlocking a system of planetary gears
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Inline-four Engine
The inline-four engine or straight-four engine is a type of inline internal combustion four-cylinder engine with all four cylinders mounted in a straight line, or plane along the crankcase. The single bank of cylinders may be oriented in either a vertical or an inclined plane with all the pistons driving a common crankshaft. Where it is inclined, it is sometimes called a slant-four. In a specification chart or when an abbreviation is used, an inline-four engine is listed either as I4 or L4 (for longitudinal, to avoid confusion between the digit 1 and the letter I). The inline-four layout is in perfect primary balance and confers a degree of mechanical simplicity which makes it popular for economy cars.[1] However, despite its simplicity, it suffers from a secondary imbalance which causes minor vibrations in smaller engines
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Gasoline
Gasoline
Gasoline
(American English), or petrol (British English), is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. On average, a 42-gallon barrel of crude oil (159 L) yields about 19 US gallons (72 L) of gasoline when processed in an oil refinery, though this varies based on the crude oil source's assay. The characteristic of a particular gasoline blend to resist igniting too early (which causes knocking and reduces efficiency in reciprocating engines) is measured by its octane rating. Gasoline
Gasoline
is produced in several grades of octane rating
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V6
A V6 engine
V6 engine
is a V engine
V engine
with six cylinders mounted on the crankshaft in two banks of three cylinders, usually set at either a 60 or 90 degree angle to each other. The V6 is one of the most compact engine configurations, usually ranging from 2.0 L to 4.3 L displacement (however, much larger examples have been produced for use in trucks), shorter than the inline 4 and more compact than the V8 engine
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Opel
Groupe PSA (2017–present) General Motors
General Motors
(1929–2017) [1]Divisions Opel
Opel
Performance Center[5]Subsidiaries Opel
Opel
Eisenach Opel
Opel
Special
Special
Vehicles[6](Exhibit 21) VauxhallWebsite opel.com Opel
Opel
(Opel, pronounced [ˈoːpl̩]) is a German automobile manufacturer part of the French Groupe PSA
Groupe PSA
since August 2017. Opel
Opel
traces its roots to a sewing machine manufacturer founded by Adam Opel
Opel
in 1862 in Rüsselsheim
Rüsselsheim
am Main. The company began manufacturing bicycles in 1886 and produced its first automobile in 1899
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
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Honda
Honda
Honda
Motor Company, Ltd
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Automobile Platform
A car platform is a shared set of common design, engineering, and production efforts, as well as major components over a number of outwardly distinct models and even types of cars, often from different, but related marques.[2] It is practiced in the automotive industry to reduce the costs associated with the development of products by basing those products on a smaller number of platforms. This further allows companies to create distinct models from a design perspective on similar underpinnings.[2]Contents1 Definition and benefits 2 Examples 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 Top Hat 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinition and benefits[edit] Platform sharing is a product development method where different products and the brand attached share the same components.[3] The purpose with platform sharing is to reduce the cost and have a more efficient product development process.[4] The companies gain on reduced procurement cost by taking advantage of the commona
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OnStar
OnStar
OnStar
Corporation is a subsidiary of General Motors
General Motors
that provides subscription-based communications, in-vehicle security, emergency services, hands-free calling, turn-by-turn navigation, and remote diagnostics systems throughout the United States, Canada, China, Mexico, Europe, Brazil, and Argentina. A similar service is known as Opel OnStar
OnStar
in western Europe
Europe
and ChevyStar in Latin American markets (except in Mexico, Brazil
Brazil
and Argentina). In September 2011 the president of OnStar
OnStar
stated that the service had more than six million customers.[1]Onstar unit in a 2008 Chevrolet
Chevrolet
ImpalaA new aftermarket interior rear-view mirror with a built-in OnStar module, branded as OnStar
OnStar
FMV, became available to the public on July 24, 2011
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Cruise Control
Cruise control
Cruise control
(sometimes known as speed control or autocruise, or tempomat in some countries) is a system that automatically controls the speed of a motor vehicle. The system is a servomechanism that takes over the throttle of the car to maintain a steady speed as set by the driver.Contents1 History 2 Operation 3 Advantages and disadvantages 4 Adaptive cruise control 5 References 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit] Speed
Speed
control was used in automobiles as early as 1900 in the Wilson-Pilcher
Wilson-Pilcher
and also in the 1910s by Peerless. Peerless
Peerless
advertised that their system would "maintain speed whether up hill or down". The technology was adopted by James Watt and Matthew Boulton
Matthew Boulton
in 1788 to control steam engines, but the use of governors dates at least back to the 17th century
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Noise, Vibration, And Harshness
Noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH), also known as noise and vibration (N&V), is the study and modification of the noise and vibration characteristics of vehicles, particularly cars and trucks. While noise and vibration can be readily measured, harshness is a subjective quality, and is measured either via "jury" evaluations, or with analytical tools that can provide results reflecting human subjective impressions. These latter tools belong to the field known as "psychoacoustics." Interior NVH deals with noise and vibration experienced by the occupants of the cabin, while exterior NVH is largely concerned with the noise radiated by the vehicle, and includes drive-by noise testing. NVH is mostly engineering, but often objective measurements fail to predict or correlate well with the subjective impression on human observers
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Nickel Metal Hydride Battery
A nickel–metal hydride battery, abbreviated NiMH or Ni–MH, is a type of rechargeable battery. The chemical reaction at the positive electrode is similar to that of the nickel–cadmium cell (NiCd), with both using nickel oxide hydroxide (NiOOH). However, the negative electrodes use a hydrogen-absorbing alloy instead of cadmium
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DOHC
Overhead camshaft,[1][2] commonly abbreviated to OHC,[1][2] is a valvetrain configuration which places the camshaft of an internal combustion engine of the reciprocating type within the cylinder heads ("above" the pistons and combustion chambers) and drives the valves or lifters in a more direct manner compared with overhead valves (OHV) and pushrods.Contents1 Overview 2 Single overhead camshaft2.1 Alternative SOHC layouts3 Dual overhead camshaft 4 Triple overhead camshaft 5 Camshaft
Camshaft
drive systems5.1 Timing belt 5.2 Timing chain 5.3 Bevel shaft 5.4 Gear train 5.5 Cranks and rods6 Variable valve timing 7 History7.1
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