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Sasha Sokolov
Sasha Sokolov (born Александр Всеволодович Соколов/Alexander Vsevolodovitch Sokolov on November 6, 1943, in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) is a paradoxical writer of Russian literature. He became known worldwide in the 1970s after his first novel, A School for Fools, had been published in translation by Ardis Publishing (Ann Arbor, Michigan) in the US, and later reissued by Four Walls Eight Windows. Sokolov is one of the most important authors of 20th-century Russian literature. He is well acclaimed for his unorthodox use of language, playing with rhythms, sounds and associations. The author himself coined the term "proeziia" for his work—in between prose and poetry (English close form of the term can sound as "proetry"). Sokolov is a Canadian citizen and has lived the larger part of his life so far in the United States
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Ottawa, Ontario
Ottawa
Ottawa
(/ˈɒtəwə/ ( listen) or /-wɑː/; French pronunciation: ​[ɔtawa]) is the capital city of Canada. It stands on the south bank of the Ottawa River
Ottawa River
in the eastern portion of southern Ontario. Ottawa
Ottawa
borders Gatineau, Quebec; the two form the core of the Ottawa– Gatineau
Gatineau
census metropolitan area (CMA) and the National Capital Region (NCR).[12] As of 2016, Ottawa
Ottawa
had a city population of 934,243 and a metropolitan population of 1,323,783 making it the fourth-largest city and the fifth-largest CMA in Canada. Founded in 1826 as Bytown, and incorporated as Ottawa
Ottawa
in 1855, the city has evolved into the political centre of Canada
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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National Library Of The Czech Republic
6,919,075 total items[1] 21,204 manuscripts[1] c. 4,200 incunabula[2]Other informationDirector Martin KocandaWebsite www.nkp.czThe National Library of the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(Czech: Národní knihovna České republiky) is the central library of the Czech Republic. It is directed by the Ministry of Culture. The library's main building is located in the historical Clementinum
Clementinum
building in Prague, where approximately half of its books are kept. The other half of the collection is stored in the district of Hostivař.[3] The National Library is the biggest library in the Czech Republic, in its funds there are around 6 million documents. The library has around 60,000 registered readers
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France"; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]See also: History of the Bibliothèque nationale de France (fr)The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Nezavisimaya Gazeta
Nezavisimaya Gazeta (Russian: Независимая газета, IPA: [nʲɪzɐˈvʲisʲɪməjə ɡɐˈzʲetə], lit. Independent Newspaper) is a Russian daily newspaper. History and profile[edit] Nezavisimaya Gazeta was first published on 21 December 1990. It was one of the most important daily newspapers in the early post-Soviet period,[1] when it was seen as close to the opinion of the Moscow intelligentsia.[2] The paper was temporarily closed for four months in 1995.[3] Then it became part of the "Berezovsky Media Group".[3] Information ranging from a wide variety of sources, such as reporters, political scientists, historians, art historians, as well as critics are published in the newspaper. The newspaper also offers eight supplements and covers the issues of politics, society, culture and art. The editor in chief is Konstantin Remchukov. The first editor of Nezavisimaya Gazeta was Vitaliy Tretyakov
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Grove Press
Grove Press is an American publishing imprint that was founded in 1947. Imprints include: Black Cat, Evergreen, Venus Library, and Zebra. Barney Rosset
Barney Rosset
purchased the company in 1951 and turned it into an alternative book press in the United States. He partnered with Richard Seaver to bring French literature to the United States. The Atlantic Monthly Press, under the aegis of its publisher, Morgan Entrekin, merged with Grove Press in 1991
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Russian Literature
Russian literature
Russian literature
refers to the literature of Russia
Russia
and its émigrés and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Rus', the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
or the Soviet Union. The roots of Russian literature can be traced to the Middle Ages, when epics and chronicles in Old Russian were composed. By the Age of Enlightenment, literature had grown in importance, and from the early 1830s, Russian literature underwent an astounding golden age in poetry, prose and drama. Romanticism
Romanticism
permitted a flowering of poetic talent: Vasily Zhukovsky and later his protégé Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Pushkin
came to the fore. Prose was flourishing as well. The first great Russian novelist was Nikolai Gogol. Then came Ivan Turgenev, who mastered both short stories and novels
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A School For Fools
A School for Fools (Школа для дураков) is a novel written by Sasha Sokolov in the 1960s. "A School for Fools" was first circulated via 'samizdat,' or self-publication through underground connections. However, the novel was formally published in 1976 in U.S. (samizdat). Школа для дураков is often classified as a work of phantasmagoric modernism. Vladimir Nabokov called it "an enchanting, tragic, and touching work." Characters[edit] -The Narrator (unnamed). -Nymphea Alba. -Those Who Came. -The narrator’s Father. -The narrator’s Mother. -Savl/Pavel Petrovich Norvegov. -Mikheev/Medvedev. -Yakov and Sheina Emmanuilovna Trachtenberg-Tinbergen. -Veta Acatova. -Arcady Arcadievich Acatov. -Rosa Windova. -Principal Perillo. Themes and Motifs[edit] -Perspective. -Time. -Narrative Voice. -Sanity.This article about a 1960s novel is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee guidelines for writing about novels
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Russian Language
Russian (Russian: ру́сский язы́к, tr. rússkiy yazýk) is an East Slavic language
East Slavic language
and an official language in Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
and many minor or unrecognised territories throughout Eurasia
Eurasia
(particularly in Eastern Europe, the Baltics, the Caucasus, and Central Asia). It is an unofficial but widely spoken language in Latvia, Moldova, Ukraine
Ukraine
and to a lesser extent, the other post-Soviet states.[31][32] Russian belongs to the family of Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and is one of the four living members of the East Slavic languages
Slavic languages
(which in turn is part of the larger Balto-Slavic branch)
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