HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Russian Orthodox Church
Coordinates: 55°42′40″N 37°37′45″E / 55.71111°N 37.62917°E / 55.71111; 37.62917Russian Orthodox Church ( Moscow
Moscow
Patriarchate)The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
in Mosc
[...More...]

"Russian Orthodox Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christ Pantocrator
In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ)[1] is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God
God
in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth "Lord of Hosts"[2] and for El Shaddai " God
God
Almighty".[3] In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18) and nine times in the Book of Revelation: 1:8, 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, and 21:22
[...More...]

"Christ Pantocrator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
(from Greek ορθοδοξία, orthodoxía – "right opinion")[1] is adherence to correct or accepted creeds, especially in religion.[2] In the Christian sense the term means "conforming to the Christian faith as represented in the creeds of the early Church."[3] The first seven Ecumenical Councils were held between the years of 325 and 787 with the aim of formalizing accepted doctrines. In some English speaking countries, Jews who adhere to all the traditions and commandments as legislated in the
[...More...]

"Orthodoxy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Four Marks Of The Church
The Four Marks of the Church is a term describing four distinctive adjectives — "One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic"[1] — of traditional Christian
Christian
ecclesiology as expressed in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed
[...More...]

"Four Marks Of The Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
[...More...]

"Christian Church" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Resurrection Of Jesus
The resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
or resurrection of Christ is the Christian religious belief that, after being put to death, Jesus
Jesus
rose again from the dead
[...More...]

"Resurrection Of Jesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crucifixion Of Jesus
The crucifixion of Jesus
Jesus
occurred in 1st century Judea, most likely between AD 30 and 33. Jesus' crucifixion is described in the four canonical gospels, referred to in the New Testament
New Testament
epistles, attested to by other ancient sources, and is established as a historical event confirmed by non-Christian sources,[1] although among historians, there is no consensus on the precise details of what exactly occurred.[2][3][4] According to the canonical gospels, Jesus, the Christ, was arrested and tried by the Sanhedrin, and then sentenced by Pontius Pilate
Pontius Pilate
to be scourged, and finally crucified by the Romans.[5][6][7][8] Jesus
Jesus
was stripped of his clothing and offered wine mixed with myrrh or gall to drink before being crucified
[...More...]

"Crucifixion Of Jesus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

History Of Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
[...More...]

"History Of Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
(/ˈhɑːɡiə soʊˈfiːə/; from the Greek: Αγία Σοφία, pronounced [aˈʝia soˈfia], "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) was a Greek Orthodox Christian
Christian
patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and is now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 AD, and until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarch
Patriarch
of Constantinople,[1] except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was later converted into an Ottoman mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931
[...More...]

"Hagia Sophia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
[...More...]

"Christianity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Saint Andrew
Andrew the Apostle
Andrew the Apostle
(Greek: Ἀνδρέας, Coptic: ⲁⲛⲇⲣⲉⲁⲥ, Andreas; from the early 1st century BC – mid to late 1st century AD), also known as Saint
Saint
Andrew and referred to in the Orthodox tradition as the First-Called (Greek: Πρωτόκλητος, Prōtoklētos), was a Christian
Christian
Apostle and the brother of Saint
Saint
Peter.[1] The name "Andrew" (Greek: manly, brave, from ἀνδρεία, Andreia, "manhood, valour"), like other Greek names, appears to have been common among the Jews, Christians, and other Hellenized people of Judea. No Hebrew or Aramaic name is recorded for him
[...More...]

"Saint Andrew" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Michael I Of Kiev (metropolitan)
Michael
Michael
/ˈmaɪkəl/ is a masculine given name that comes from Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל / מיכאל‎ (Mīkhāʼēl, pronounced [miχaˈʔel]), derived from the question מי כאל mī kāʼēl, meaning "Who is like God?".[1] Patronymic surnames that come from Michael
Michael
include Carmichael, DiMichele, MacMichael, McMichael, Michaels, Micallef, Michaelson, Michels, Mihály, Mikeladze, Mikhaylov, Mikkelsen, Mitchell and Mykhaylenko.Contents1 Religion 2 Popularity 3 See also 4 ReferencesReligion[edit] The name first appears in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
in the Book of Numbers, 13:13 where Sethur the son of Michael
Michael
is one of 12 spies sent into the Land of Canaan. Michael
Michael
features in the Book of Daniel
Book of Daniel
12:1, as the archangel in romanization, and in the Islamic Quran
Quran
as Mikaeel
[...More...]

"Michael I Of Kiev (metropolitan)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vladimir The Great
Vladimir the Great
Vladimir the Great
(also (Saint) Vladimir of Kiev; Old East Slavic: Володимѣръ Свѧтославичь, Volodiměrъ Svętoslavičь,[3] Old Norse Valdamarr gamli;[4] c. 958 – 15 July 1015, Berestove) was a prince of Novgorod, grand prince of Kiev, and ruler of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
from 980 to 1015.[5][6] Vladimir's father was prince Sviatoslav of the Rurik dynasty.[7] After the death of his father in 972, Vladimir, who was then prince of Novgorod, was forced to flee to Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in 976 after his brother Yaropolk had murdered his other brother Oleg and conquered Rus'
[...More...]

"Vladimir The Great" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism
The degrees of Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
monasticism are the stages an Eastern Orthodox monk or nun passes through in their religious vocation. In the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church, the process of becoming a monk or nun is intentionally slow, as the monastic vows taken are considered to entail a lifelong commitment to God, and are not to be entered into lightly. After completing the novitiate, there are three degrees of or steps in conferring the monastic habit.Contents1 Orthodox monasticism 2 Degrees2.1 Novice 2.2 Rassophore 2.3 Stavrophore 2.4 Great Schema3 Coptic Orthodox monastic degrees 4 See also 5 External linksOrthodox monasticism[edit] Unlike in Western Christianity, where individual religious orders and societies arose, each with its own profession rites, in the Eastern Orthodox Church, there is only one type of monasticism
[...More...]

"Degrees Of Eastern Orthodox Monasticism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Priesthood (Orthodox Church)
Presbyter is, in the Bible, a synonym for bishop (episkopos), referring to a leader in local Church congregations. In modern usage, it is distinct from bishop and synonymous with priest. Its literal meaning in Greek (presbyteros) is "elder." One addresses a Greek Orthodox Priest as “Father”.Contents1 Holy orders 2 Ministry 3 History 4 Modern usage 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksHoly orders[edit] Through the sacrament of holy orders, an ordination to priesthood is performed by the bishop. But this requires the consent of the whole people of God, so at a point in the service, the congregation acclaim the ordination by shouting Axios! (He is worthy!) Orthodox priests consist of both married clergymen and celibate clergymen. In the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
a married man may be ordained to the priesthood. His marriage, however, must be the first for both him and his wife
[...More...]

"Priesthood (Orthodox Church)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.