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Roy Fedden
Sir Alfred Hubert Roy Fedden
Roy Fedden
MBE, FRAeS (6 June 1885 – 21 November 1973)[1] was an engineer who designed most of Bristol
Bristol
Engine Company's successful piston aircraft engine designs.Contents1 Early life 2 Apprenticeship 3 Cosmos Engineering
Cosmos Engineering
and the Jupiter 4 Development of sleeve valve engines 5 Later war and after 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksEarly life[edit] Fedden was born in the Bristol
Bristol
area to fairly wealthy and influential parents. His older brother was the artist Romilly Fedden. Fedden's family was the first in the area to own a car, an interesting parallel with fellow engine designer, Harry Ricardo. This early influence almost certainly led to his future career. Fedden attended Clifton College, but did not do well scholastically and was known primarily for sports
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Bristol
Urban Chris Skidmore
Chris Skidmore
(Con) Jack Lopresti
Jack Lopresti
(Con)Area • City and county 40 sq mi (110 km2)Elevation[1] 36&#
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Poppet Valve
A poppet valve (also called mushroom valve[1]) is a valve typically used to control the timing and quantity of gas or vapour flow into an engine. It consists of a hole, usually round or oval, and a tapered plug, usually a disk shape on the end of a shaft also called a valve stem. The portion of the hole where the plug meets with it is referred to as the 'seat' or 'valve seat'. The shaft guides the plug portion by sliding through a valve guide. In exhaust applications a pressure differential helps to seal the valve and in intake valves a pressure differential helps open it. The poppet valve was most likely invented in 1833 by E.A.G
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ABC Dragonfly
A dragonfly is an insect belonging to the order Odonata, infraorder Anisoptera (from Greek ἄνισος anisos, "uneven" and πτερόν pteron, "wing", because the hindwing is broader than the forewing). Adult dragonflies are characterized by large, multifaceted eyes, two pairs of strong, transparent wings, sometimes with coloured patches, and an elongated body. Dragonflies can be mistaken for the related group, damselflies (Zygoptera), which are similar in structure, though usually lighter in build; however, the wings of most dragonflies are held flat and away from the body, while damselflies hold the wings folded at rest, along or above the abdomen. Dragonflies are agile fliers, while damselflies have a weaker, fluttery flight. Many dragonflies have brilliant iridescent or metallic colours produced by structural coloration, making them conspicuous in flight
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Brecknock
Brecknockshire
Brecknockshire
(Welsh: Sir Frycheiniog), also known as the County of Brecknock, Breconshire, or the County of Brecon
Brecon
is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales, and a former administrative county. Named after its county town of Brecon
Brecon
(archaically "Brecknock"), the county is mountainous and primarily rural.Contents1 Geography 2 History2.1 Creation of county 2.2 Nineteenth and twentieth centuries2.2.1 Governance 2.2.2 Coat of arms2.3 Legacy3 Places of interest 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingGeography[edit] Brecknockshire
Brecknockshire
is bounded to the north by Radnorshire, to the east by Herefordshire
Herefordshire
and Monmouthshire, to the south by Monmouthshire and Glamorgan, and to the west by Carmarthenshire
Carmarthenshire
and Cardiganshire. The county is predominantly rural and mountainous
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Sir George White, 1st Baronet
Sir George White, 1st Baronet (1854–1916) was an English businessman and stockbroker based in Bristol. He was instrumental in the construction of the Bristol tramways and became a pioneer in the construction of electric tramways in England. In 1910 he formed, with his brother Samuel, the Bristol Aeroplane Company. He had many other interests, particularly in transport companies.Contents1 Early life 2 Tramways, cabs and omnibuses 3 Motor vehicles 4 Aircraft 5 Other interests 6 Philanthropy 7 Personal life and death 8 Archives 9 Successors to the title 10 References 11 Bibliography 12 Further readingEarly life[edit] White was born in Kingsdown, Bristol on 38 June 1854, the son of James White, a painter and decorator and his mother, Eliza had been a domestic servant before marrying.[1] He attended St Michaels Boys' School, and in 1869 joined a Bristol firm of solicitors Stanley & Wasbrough [2] as a junior clerk
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Bristol Filton Airport
Filton
Filton
Airport or Filton
Filton
Aerodrome (IATA: FZO, ICAO: EGTG) was a private airport on the border between Filton
Filton
and Patchway, within South Gloucestershire, 4 NM (7.4 km; 4.6 mi)[1] north of Bristol, England. The airfield is bordered by the A38 road
A38 road
at the start of the runway, and the former London to Avonmouth
Avonmouth
railway line to the left
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Turbosupercharger
A turbocharger, or colloquially turbo, is a turbine-driven forced induction device that increases an internal combustion engine's efficiency and power output by forcing extra air into the combustion chamber.[1][2] This improvement over a naturally aspirated engine's power output is due to the fact that the compressor can force more air—and proportionately more fuel—into the combustion chamber than atmospheric pressure (and for that matter, ram air intakes) alone. Turbochargers were originally known as turbosuperchargers when all forced induction devices were classified as superchargers. Today the term "supercharger" is typically applied only to mechanically driven forced induction devices. The key difference between a turbocharger and a conventional supercharger is that a supercharger is mechanically driven by the engine, often through a belt connected to the crankshaft, whereas a turbocharger is powered by a turbine driven by the engine's exhaust gas
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Supercharger
A supercharger is an air compressor that increases the pressure or density of air supplied to an internal combustion engine
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Royal Aircraft Establishment
The Royal Aircraft Establishment
Royal Aircraft Establishment
(RAE) was a British research establishment, known by several different names during its history, that eventually came under the aegis of the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), before finally losing its identity in mergers with other institutions. The first site was at Farnborough Airfield ("RAE Farnborough") in
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Sunbeam Arab
The Sunbeam Arab was a British First World War era aero engine.[1]Contents1 Design and development 2 Variants 3 Applications 4 Specifications (Arab I)4.1 General characteristics 4.2 Components 4.3 Performance5 See also 6 References6.1 Bibliography7 External linksDesign and development[edit] By 1916 the demand for aero-engines was placing huge demands on manufacturing. To help ease the pressure the War Office standardised on engines of about 200 hp (149 kW); one of these was a V-8 water-cooled engine from Sunbeam known as the Arab
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Napier Sabre
The Napier Sabre
Napier Sabre
was a British H-24-cylinder, liquid-cooled, sleeve valve, piston aero engine, designed by Major Frank Halford and built by D. Napier & Son during World War II. The engine evolved to become one of the most powerful inline piston aircraft engines in the world, developing from 2,200 horsepower (1,640 kW) in its earlier versions to 3,500 hp (2,600 kW) in late-model prototypes.[1] The first operational aircraft to be powered by the Sabre were the Hawker Typhoon
Hawker Typhoon
and Hawker Tempest; the first aircraft powered by the Sabre was the Napier-Heston Racer, which was designed to capture the world speed record.[nb 1] Other aircraft using the Sabre were early prototype and production variants of the Blackburn Firebrand, the Martin-Baker MB 3
Martin-Baker MB 3
prototype and a Hawker Fury prototype
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Hawker Tempest
The Hawker Tempest
Hawker Tempest
is a British fighter aircraft primarily used by the Royal Air Force
Royal Air Force
(RAF) in the Second World War. The Tempest, originally known as the Typhoon II, was an improved derivative of the Hawker Typhoon, intended to address the Typhoon's unexpected fall-off of performance at high altitude by replacing its wing with a thinner laminar flow design. Having diverged considerably from the Typhoon, it was chosen to rename the aircraft Tempest
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Bomber Aircraft
A bomber is a combat aircraft designed to attack ground and naval targets by dropping air-to-ground weaponry (such as bombs), firing torpedoes and bullets or deploying air-launched cruise missiles.Contents1 Classification1.1 Strategic 1.2 Tactical2 History2.1 The first bombers 2.2 Strategic bombing 2.3 World War II 2.4 Cold War 2.5 Modern era3 See also 4 References 5 External linksClassification[edit]A Russian Tupolev Tu-160
Tupolev Tu-160
strategic bomber.Strategic[edit] Further information: Carpet bombing
Carpet bombing
and Strategic bomber Strategic bombing
Strategic bombing
is done by heavy bombers primarily designed for long-range bombing missions against strategic targets such as supply bases, bridges, factories, shipyards, and cities themselves, in order to diminish the enemy's ability to wage war by limiting access to resources through crippling infrastructure or reducing industrial output
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Patrol Aircraft
A maritime patrol aircraft (MPA), also known as a patrol aircraft, maritime reconnaissance aircraft, or by the older American term patrol bomber, is a fixed-wing aircraft designed to operate for long durations over water in maritime patrol roles — in particular anti-submarine warfare (ASW), anti-ship warfare (AShW), and search and rescue (SAR).Contents1 History1.1 World War I 1.2 World War II 1.3 Post–World War II2 Armament and countermeasures 3 Sensors 4 Examples 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]SS class airshipWorld War I[edit] The first aircraft that would now be identified as maritime patrol aircraft were flown by the Royal Naval Air Service
Royal Naval Air Service
and the French Aéronautique Maritime
Aéronautique Maritime
during World War I, primarily on anti-submarine patrols
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