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Red Oaks
The genus Quercus (oak) contains about 600 species,[1] some of which are listed here. For the taxonomic status of the oaks see The Plant List.[2]Contents1 Subgenus Quercus1.1 Section Quercus 1.2 Section Mesobalanus 1.3 Section Cerris 1.4 Section Protobalanus 1.5 Section Lobatae2 Subgenus Cyclobalanopsis 3 Notes 4 External links 5 Sources 6 ReferencesSubgenus Quercus[edit] Section Quercus[edit] "White oak" redirects here. For other uses, see White oak (other). The white oaks (synonym sect. Lepidobalanus or Leucobalanus). Europe, Asia, north Africa, North America
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Genus
A genus (/ˈdʒiːnəs/, pl. genera /ˈdʒɛnərə/) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology. In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family. In binomial nomenclature, the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus.E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis silvestris
Felis silvestris
are two species within the genus Felis. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae.The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist. The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Quercus Glaucoides
Quercus glaucoides is an oak species in the white oak section, Quercus section Quercus, found in and endemic to eastern, central and southern Mexico (Guanajuato, Guerrero, México State, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Michoacán, Oaxaca, Puebla).[2][3] Description[edit] Quercus glaucoides is primarily a canopy tree in its native habitat. It is an evergreen tree up to 10 meters tall with a trunk diameter over 40 centimeters. Leaves are thick and leathery, up to 15 cm long, with a few shallow rounded lobes.[2] Its scientific name is often misapplied to the NE Mexican and central Texas native Lacey Oak (Quercus laceyi), which has caused great confusion about the true identity of this species and the correct scientific name for the Lacey Oak. Although somewhat related, they do not share the same native range, with Q. glaucoides being endemic to Mexico, while Q. laceyi is native to both NE Mexico and central Texas, and Q. glaucoides is evergreen, while Q
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Quercus Douglasii
Quercus douglasii, known as blue oak, is a species of oak endemic to (found only in) California, common in the Coast Ranges and foothills of the Sierra Nevada.[3] It is occasionally known as mountain oak and iron oak.[4][5]Contents1 Description 2 Ecology 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDescription[edit]Leaves and acornLeaves in lobed form. Quercus douglasii
Quercus douglasii
is a medium-sized tree, generally 6–20 m (20–66 ft) tall, with a trunk 36–60 cm (1–2 ft) in DBH.[6] The tallest recorded specimen was found in Alameda County, at 28.7 m (94 ft). The bark is light gray with many medium-sized dark cracks; from a distance, it can appear almost white. The name blue oak derives from the dark blue-green tint of its leaves, which are deciduous, 4–10 cm (1.6–3.9 in) long, and entire or shallowly lobed
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Quercus Dumosa
Quercus dumosa is a species of plant in the Fagaceae family. This tree goes by the common names coastal sage scrub oak,[2] Nuttall's scrub oak, and California scrub oak.[3]Contents1 Distribution 2 Botanical characteristics 3 Ecology 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDistribution[edit] Quercus dumosa is found in Baja California and in California, with an isolated population reported on Harquahala Mountain in western Arizona.[4][5] It is threatened by habitat loss.[6] The species lends its name to the plant community called the "Quercus dumosa chaparral", in which Coastal sage scrub oak and toyon often co-dominate in chaparral.[7] Botanical characteristics[edit] Quercus dumosa is an evergreen shrub growing 1 to 3 meters (40-120 inches or 3.3-10.0 feet) tall from a large, deep root network. The leaves have spiny or toothed edges. The fruit is an acorn up to 1.5 centimeters (0.6 inches) wide. Some individuals produce large crops of acorns, and some produce very few fruits
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Quercus Durata
Quercus durata (California scrub oak, leather oak) is an oak endemic to California. Quercus durata var. durata is a strict serpentine endemic that grows in the Coast Ranges and northern Sierra Nevada. It is often a component of serpentine chaparral.[2] Quercus durata is an evergreen shrub occasionally reaching 3 meters (10 feet) in height but usually much shorter. Leaves are rarely flat, usually cupped, with a thick layer of small branching hairs on the underside making it feel like felt.[3][4]Contents1 Cultivation 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCultivation[edit] Quercus durata is often used as an urban tree and medicinal plant.[citation needed] See also[edit]Trees portalCalifornia chaparral and woodlands - (ecoregion)References[edit]^ The Plant List, Quercus durata Jeps. ^ Calflora taxon report, University of California, Quercus durata Jepson, leather oak ^ Flora of North America: Quercus durata ^ C. Michael Hogan. 2010. Leather Oak, Quercus durata
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Quercus Engelmannii
Quercus
Quercus
engelmannii, the Engelmann oak or Pasadena oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus
Quercus
sect. Quercus, native to southern California and northwestern Baja California, Mexico.[2][3]Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Quercus
Quercus
engelmannii is a small tree growing to 10 m (33 ft) tall, generally evergreen, but may be drought-deciduous during the hot, dry local summers, and has a rounded or elliptical canopy. The bark is thick, furrowed, and light gray-brown. The leaves are leathery, 3–6 cm (1–2.5 in) long and 1–2 cm (0.5–1 in) broad, of a blue-green color, and may be flat or wavy, with smooth margins
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Quercus Fabrei
Quercus fabri HanceQuercus fabrei (Faber's oak) is a species of deciduous oak tree found in China (Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, south Shaanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan and Zhejiang provinces[3]) including Hong Kong (Tai Po and Northern districts[4]). Faber's oak can take on the form of either a large shrub or a tree, with the latter form reaching up to 20 metres in height.[3] The tree has elongated leaves, with the tip of the leaf being wider than the base.[5] The leaves are serrated, although the teeth are smaller than those of more well-known oak species such as Quercus robur.[6] References[edit]^ Tropicos, Quercus fabrei Hance ^ The Plant List, Quercus fabrei Hance ^ a b "Quercus fabri in A Checklist for the South China Botanical Garden, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P. R. China @ efloras.org". www.efloras.org
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Quercus Faginea
Quercus faginea, the Portuguese oak or Valencian oak, is a species of oak native to the western Mediterranean region
Mediterranean region
in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands. Similar trees in the Atlas Mountains of northwest Africa
Africa
are usually included in this species, or sometimes treated as a distinct species Quercus tlemcenensis. It occurs in mountains between 0–1900 metres altitude, and flourishes in a variety of soils and climates. Quercus faginea
Quercus faginea
is a medium-sized deciduous or semi-evergreen tree growing to 20 meters tall, with a trunk up to 80 cm in diameter, with grey-brown bark. The tree can live as long as 600 years. The leaves are 4–10 cm long and 1.2–4 cm broad (rarely to 15 cm long and 5 cm broad), glossy dark green to grey-green above, and variably felted grey-white below; the margins have 5-12 pairs of irregular teeth
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Quercus Fusiformis
Quercus fusiformis (also often referred to as Q. virginiana var. fusiformis), commonly known as escarpment live oak, plateau live oak, or plateau oak, is an evergreen or nearly evergreen tree. Its native range includes the Quartz Mountains and Wichita Mountains in southwestern Oklahoma,[2] through Texas, to the Mexican states of Coahuila, Tamaulipas, and Nuevo León.[3][4] Quercus fusiformis is an evergreen tree in the white oak section of the genus Quercus. It is distinguished from Quercus virginiana (southern live oak) most easily by the acorns, which are slightly larger and with a more pointed apex. It is also a smaller tree, not exceeding 1 meter (40 inches) in trunk diameter (compared to 2.5 m (75 inches) in diameter in southern live oak), with more erect branching and a less wide crown.[4] Like Q
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Quercus Gambelii
Quercus gambelii, with the common name Gambel oak, is a deciduous small tree or large shrub that is widespread in the foothills and lower mountain elevations of western North America. It is also regionally called scrub oak, oak brush, and white oak.[3][4] As the Gambel oak and Quercus gambelii, it was named after the American naturalist William Gambel (1823–1849).Contents1 Distribution 2 Description 3 Habitat 4 Uses 5 References 6 External linksDistribution[edit] The natural range of Quercus gambelii is centered in the western United States and northwestern Mexico, in the states of Arizona, Chihuahua, Colorado, New Mexico, Sonora, and Utah
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Quercus Garryana
Quercus garryana, the Garry oak, Oregon
Oregon
white oak, Oregon
Oregon
oak, or Hu'dshnam, from the traditional Klamath language, is a tree species with a range stretching from southern California
California
to southwestern British Columbia. It grows from sea level to 210 meters (690 ft) altitude in the northern part of its range, and at 300 to 1,800 meters (980 to 5,910 ft) in the south of the range in California. The tree gets one of its names from Nicholas Garry, deputy governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, 1822–35.[3]Contents1 Range 2 Varieties 3 Growth characteristics 4 Natural History 5 Uses 6 Conservation 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksRange[edit] In British Columbia, the Garry oak grows on the Gulf Islands
Gulf Islands
and southeastern Vancouver Island, from west of Victoria along the east side of the island up to the Campbell River area
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Quercus Geminata
Quercus geminata, commonly called sand live oak, is an evergreen oak tree native to the coastal regions of the subtropical southeastern United States, along the Atlantic Coast from southern Florida northward to southeastern Virginia and along the Gulf Coast westward to southern Mississippi,[4] on seacoast dunes and on white sands in evergreen oak scrubs.[1] A small- to medium-sized tree, the sand live oak is scrubby and forms thickets. The bark is dark, thick, furrowed, and roughly ridged. The leaves are thick, leathery, and coarsely veined, with extremely revolute margins, giving them the appearance of inverted shallow bowls; their tops dark green, their bottoms dull gray and very tightly tomentose, and their petioles densely pubescent, they are simple and typically flat with bony-opaque margins, having a length of 0.75–4.5 inches (2–12 cm) and a width of 0.2–1.5 inches (0.5–4 cm). The male flowers are green hanging catkins
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Quercus Greggii
Quercus greggi, otherwise known as the Mexican oak, is a dioecious semi-evergreen oak that is adapted to survive in arid conditions. It is native to Mexico and commonly grow around 2000–3300 meters North of the 24th parallel and spreads across multiple locales. The plants grow to approximately 20–25 feet in height (can be as small as 6 feet) and 10–15 feet in width with waxy rounded-ovular leaves that have dimensions around 3-6 x 2–4 cm. The leaves are general covered in a dense layer of trichomes. The bark is scale-like and light grey; it is covered in small lenticels, allowing the plants to undergo gas exchange with the surrounding atmosphere. The twigs of the plant are covered in thick woolly hairs. Around April, the trees produce catkins that can have approximately 18 flowers are around 3-4.5 cm long. Seeing that the plants are dioecious, they also produce female reproductive organs called inflorescence
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Quercus Deserticola
Quercus deserticola is a Mexican species of oaks in the beech family. It grows in central Mexico in the States of Guanajuato, México, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Querétaro, Oaxaca, Sinaloa, Puebla, and Michoacán.[2][3] Description[edit] Quercus deserticola is a shrub or small tree sometimes as much as 7 meters (23 feet) in height, with gray bark. Twigs are yellow-green, densely hairy. Leaves are oblong, hairy, semi-leathery, up to 85 mm (3.4 inches) long, sometimes toothless but other times with 2-5 teeth on either side, the teeth sometimes arranged asymmetrically.[3] References[edit]^ The Plant List, Quercus deserticola Trel. ^ McVaugh, R. 1974. Flora Novo-Galiciana: Fagaceae. Contributions from the University of Michigan Herbarium 12(1,3): 1–93 ^ a b Romero Rangel, S., E. C. Rojas Zenteno & M. L. Aguilar Enríquez. 2002. El género Quercus (Fagaceae) en el estado de México
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Quercus Grisea
Quercus grisea, commonly known as the gray oak, shin oak or scrub oak, is a North American species deciduous or evergreen shrub or medium-sized tree in the white oak group. It is native to the mountains of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico.[2] It hybridizes with four other oak species where the ranges of each overlap, the Arizona white oak (Q. arizonica), the Gambel oak (Q. gambelii), the Mohr shin oak (Q. mohriana) and the sandpaper oak (Q. pungens).[3]Contents1 Distribution 2 Description 3 Habitat 4 References 5 External linksDistribution[edit] The gray oak grows in the mountains of the southwestern United States (western Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Colorado, and the Oklahoma Panhandle) and northern Mexico (Sonora, Sinaloa, Chihuahua, Durango, Coahuila, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Hidalgo)
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