HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ragnar Frisch
Ragnar Anton Kittil Frisch (3 March 1895 – 31 January 1973) was a Norwegian economist and the co-recipient of the first Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1969 (with Jan Tinbergen). He is known for being one of the founders of the discipline of econometrics, and for coining the widely used term pair macroeconomics/microeconomics in 1933. Frisch was appointed by the King-in-Council
King-in-Council
as Professor of Economics and Statistics at the Faculty of Law, The Royal Frederick University in 1931
[...More...]

"Ragnar Frisch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Probability Theory
Probability
Probability
theory is the branch of mathematics concerned with probability. Although there are several different probability interpretations, probability theory treats the concept in a rigorous mathematical manner by expressing it through a set of axioms. Typically these axioms formalise probability in terms of a probability space, which assigns a measure taking values between 0 and 1, termed the probability measure, to a set of outcomes called the sample space. Any specified subset of these outcomes is called an event. Central subjects in probability theory include discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, and stochastic processes, which provide mathematical abstractions of non-deterministic or uncertain processes or measured quantities that may either be single occurrences or evolve over time in a random fashion. Although it is not possible to perfectly predict random events, much can be said about their behavior
[...More...]

"Probability Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Allyn Young
Allyn Abbott Young (September 19, 1876 – March 7, 1929) was a celebrated American economist. He was born into a middle-class family in Kenton, Ohio. He died aged 52 in London, his life cut short by pneumonia during an influenza epidemic. He was then at the height of his intellectual powers and current president of Section F of the British Association. Uniquely, Young had also been president of the American Statistical Association (1917) and the American Economic Association (1925). As documented in a 1995 biography by Charles Blitch, Young was a brilliant student, graduating from Hiram College in 1892 at the age of sixteen, the youngest graduate on record. After a few years in the printing trade he enrolled in 1898 in the graduate school of the University of Wisconsin where he studied economics under Richard T. Ely and William A. Scott, history under Charles H. Haskins and Frederick Jackson Turner, and statistics under Edward D. Jones
[...More...]

"Allyn Young" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rockefeller Foundation
The Rockefeller Foundation
Rockefeller Foundation
is a private foundation based at 420 Fifth Avenue, New York City.[4] It was established by the six-generation Rockefeller family. The Foundation was started by Standard Oil
Standard Oil
owner John D. Rockefeller
John D. Rockefeller
("Senior"), along with his son John D. Rockefeller Jr
[...More...]

"Rockefeller Foundation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Production Theory
Production is a process of combining various material inputs and immaterial inputs (plans, know-how) in order to make something for consumption (the output). It is the act of creating output, a good or service which has value and contributes to the utility of individuals.[1] Economic well-being is created in a production process, meaning all economic activities that aim directly or indirectly to satisfy human wants and needs. The degree to which the needs are satisfied is often accepted as a measure of economic well-being. In production there are two features which explain increasing economic well-being. They are improving quality-price-ratio of goods and services and increasing incomes from growing and more efficient market production. The most important forms of production are:market production public production household productionIn order to understand the origin of the economic well-being, we must understand these three production processes
[...More...]

"Production Theory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cardinal Utility
In economics, a cardinal utility function or scale is a utility index that preserves preference orderings uniquely up to positive affine transformations.[1][2] Two utility indices are related by an affine transformation if for the value u ( x i ) displaystyle u(x_ i ) of one index u, occurring at any quantity x i displaystyle x_ i of the goods bundle being evaluated, the corresponding value v ( x i ) displaystyle v(x_ i ) of the other index v satisfies a relationship of the form v ( x i ) = a u ( x i ) + b displaystyle v(x_ i )=au(x_ i )+b! ,for fixed constants a and b
[...More...]

"Cardinal Utility" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ordinal Utility
In economics, an ordinal utility function is a function representing the preferences of an agent on an ordinal scale. The ordinal utility theory claims that it is only meaningful to ask which option is better than the other, but it is meaningless to ask how much better it is or how good it is. All of the theory of consumer decision-making under conditions of certainty can be, and typically is, expressed in terms of ordinal utility. For example, suppose George tells us that "I prefer A to B and B to C"
[...More...]

"Ordinal Utility" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mathematical Statistics
Mathematical statistics
Mathematical statistics
is the application of mathematics to statistics, which was originally conceived as the science of the state[citation needed] — the collection and analysis of facts about a country: its economy, land, military, population, and so on. Mathematical techniques which are used for this include mathematical analysis, linear algebra, stochastic analysis, differential equations, and measure-theoretic probability theory.[1][2]Contents1 Introduction 2 Topics2.1
[...More...]

"Mathematical Statistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Henry Schultz
Henry Schultz (September 4, 1893 – November 26, 1938) was an American economist, statistician, and one of the founders of econometrics.Contents1 Life 2 Work2.1 Selected publications3 Influences and legacy 4 See also 5 Notes and references5.1 Notes 5.2 ReferencesLife[edit] Henry Schultz[1] was born on September 4, 1893 in a Polish Jewish family in Sharkawshchyna,[2] in the Russian Empire (now part of Belarus). " Schultz's family - father, mother (Rebecca Kissin) with their 2 sons - Henry and his brother Joseph moved to New York City in the United States. Henry Schultz completed his primary education, as well as undergraduate studies at the College of the City of New York, receiving a BA in 1916. For graduate work, Henry Schultz enrolled at Columbia University, but had to interrupt studies in 1917 because of World War I
[...More...]

"Henry Schultz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
[...More...]

"France" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Apprenticeship
An apprenticeship is a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a trade or profession with on-the-job training and often some accompanying study (classroom work and reading). Apprenticeship
Apprenticeship
also enables practitioners to gain a license to practice in a regulated profession. Most of their training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentices learn their trade or profession, in exchange for their continued labor for an agreed period after they have achieved measurable competencies. Apprenticeships typically last 3 to 7 years
[...More...]

"Apprenticeship" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kongsberg Silver Mines
The silver mines of Kongsberg, in Buskerud
Buskerud
county in Norway, constitute the largest mining field in Norway, with over 80 different mines. It was the largest pre-industrial working place in Norway, with over 4,000 workers at its peak in the 1770s and supplied over 10% of the gross national product of the Danish–Norwegian union
Danish–Norwegian union
during its 335-year-long history: over 450,000 man-years were expended in the production. The town of Kongsberg
Kongsberg
houses the Norwegian Mining
Mining
Museum, which houses collection of silver, tools, and machinery utilised by the miners, engineers, and doctors.Contents1 History1.1 First discovery of silver2 Tourist attraction 3 Sources 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] First discovery of silver[edit] Silver
Silver
was first discovered between the 1 July and 5 July 1623
[...More...]

"Kongsberg Silver Mines" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kongsberg
Kongsberg
Kongsberg
( listen (help·info)) is a town and municipality in Buskerud
Buskerud
county, Norway. Kongsberg
Kongsberg
is the administration center in Kongsberg
Kongsberg
municipality. The city is located on the river Numedalslågen
Numedalslågen
at the entrance to the valley of Numedal. The municipality of Kongsberg
Kongsberg
was established on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt). The rural municipalities of Ytre Sandsvær
Ytre Sandsvær
and Øvre Sandsvær were merged into the municipality of Kongsberg
Kongsberg
on 1 January 1964.[2][3] Kongsberg
Kongsberg
is the site of the Royal Norwegian Mint (Norwegian: Det Norske Myntverket), which mints Norwegian coins and also produces circulating and collectors' coins for other countries
[...More...]

"Kongsberg" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Silversmith
A silversmith is a craftsman who crafts objects from silver. The terms "silversmith" and "goldsmith" are not exactly synonyms as the techniques, training, history, and guilds are or were largely the same but the end product may vary greatly as may the scale of objects created. However most goldsmiths have also worked in silver although the reverse may not be the case. Silversmithing is the art of turning silver sheet metal into hollow ware (dishes, bowls, porringers, cups, candlesticks, vases, ewers, urns, etc.), flatware (silverware), and other articles of household silver, church plate or sculpture
[...More...]

"Silversmith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Goldsmith
A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with gold and other precious metals. Historically, goldsmiths also have made silverware, platters, goblets, decorative and serviceable utensils, ceremonial or religious items, and rarely using Kintsugi,[1] but the rising prices of precious metals have curtailed the making of such items to a large degree. Goldsmiths must be skilled in forming metal through filing, soldering, sawing, forging, casting, and polishing metal. The trade has very often included jewellery-making skills, as well as the very similar skills of the silversmith
[...More...]

"Goldsmith" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.