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Poorna Kumbham
A kalasha, also spelled kalash or kalasa (Sanskrit: कलश;;kalaśa,Tamil: பூரணகும்பம்;;pooranakumbham, literally "pitcher, pot"), is a metal (brass, copper, silver or gold) pot with a large base and small mouth, large enough to hold a coconut. Sometimes "Kalasha" also refers to such a pot filled with water and topped with a coronet of mango leaves and a coconut. This combination is often used in Hindu
Hindu
rites and depicted in Hindu
Hindu
iconography. The entire arrangement is called Purna- Kalasha
Kalasha
(पूर्णकलश), Purna- Kumbha
Kumbha
(पूर्णकुम्भ), or Purna-ghata (पूर्णघट)
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Mandir Kalasha
A mandir kalash is a metal or stone spire used to top the domes of Hindu
Hindu
temples. It is like a tree topper. It has been used for the purpose since the eras the Chalukyas, Guptas
Guptas
and Mauryas.[citation needed]Contents1 Types 2 Materials 3 Gallery 4 ReferencesTypes[edit] Basically, There are four types of mandir kalash:[citation needed]Singh-Kalash ( Singh : Horn ) : this is the most commonly used kalash, such as in the Siddhivinayak Temple in Mumbai. It is shaped like the horn of a bull. Hence, it is named so. Tri-Kalash ( Tri : Three ) : This is a group of three long kalash. It is mostly used on Gopurams
Gopurams
and main gates. Example: Badrinath Temple. Matka-Kalash ( Matka : Pot ) : This kalash is shaped like pitchers and earthern pots. it appears as if pots have been placed on top of one another
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Ap (water)
Ap (áp-) is the Vedic Sanskrit term for "water", which in Classical Sanskrit only occurs in the plural, āpas (sometimes re-analysed as a thematic singular, āpa-), whence Hindi
Hindi
āp. The term is from PIE
PIE
hxap "water".[note 1] The Indo-Iranian word also survives as the Persian word for water, āb, e.g. in Punjab (from panj-āb "five waters"). In archaic ablauting contractions, the laryngeal of the PIE
PIE
root remains visible in Vedic Sanskrit, e.g. pratīpa- "against the current", from *proti-hxp-o-. In Tamil, Ap means water, and has references in poetry. In the Rigveda, several hymns are dedicated to "the waters" (āpas): 7.49, 10.9, 10.30, 10.47. In the oldest of these, 7.49, the waters are connected with the drought of Indra. Agni, the god of fire, has a close association with water and is often referred to as Apām Napāt "offspring of the waters"
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Devi
Devī (Sanskrit: देवी) is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word for "goddess"; the masculine form is Deva
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Womb
The uterus (from Latin
Latin
"uterus", plural uteri) or womb is a major female hormone-responsive secondary sex organ of the reproductive system in humans and most other mammals. In the human, the lower end of the uterus, the cervix, opens into the vagina, while the upper end, the fundus, is connected to the fallopian tubes. It is within the uterus that the fetus develops during gestation. In the human embryo, the uterus develops from the paramesonephric ducts which fuse into the single organ known as a simplex uterus
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Kamadeva
Kāmadeva ( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
in Devanagari: कामदेव), Kāma or Manmatha is the Hindu
Hindu
god of human love[2] or desire, often portrayed along with his female counterpart Rati. Some narratives also reference Pradyumna, Krishna's son, as a reincarnation of Kamadeva.[2]Contents1 Etymology and other names 2 Iconography 3 Textual sources 4 Mythology4.1 Birth 4.2 Incineration by Shiva 4.3 Reincarnation as Krishna's son5 Beliefs and worship5.1 Rituals and festivals 5.2 In Gaudiya Vaishnavism6 Temples 7 See also 8 Footnotes 9 ReferencesEtymology and other names[edit] The name Kama-deva ( IAST
IAST
kāma-deva) can be translated as 'god of love'. Deva means heavenly or divine. Kama
Kama
( IAST
IAST
kāma) means "desire" or "longing", especially as in sensual or sexual love. The name is used in Rig Veda
Rig Veda
(RV 9, 113
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Puja (Hinduism)
Pūjā or Poojan or Poosei(Thamizh)(Devanagari: पूजा) is a prayer ritual performed by Hindus of devotional worship to one or more deities, or to host and honor a guest, or one to spiritually celebrate an event.[1][2] Sometimes spelt phonetically as pooja or poojah, it may honour or celebrate the presence of special guest(s), or their memories after they die. The word pūjā comes from Sanskrit, and means reverence, honour, homage, adoration, and worship.[3] Puja rituals are also held by Buddhists
Buddhists
and Jains. In Hinduism, puja is done on a variety of occasions, frequency and settings. It may include daily puja done in the home, to occasional temple ceremonies and annual festivals
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Vishnu
Vishnu
Vishnu
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [vɪʂɳu]; Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST: Viṣṇu) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
in its Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition.[5][6] Vishnu
Vishnu
is the "preserver" in the Hindu
Hindu
trinity (Trimurti) that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Shiva.[7] In Vaishnavism, Vishnu
Vishnu
is identical to the formless metaphysical concept called Brahman, the supreme, the Svayam Bhagavan, who takes various avatars as "the preserver, protector" whenever the world is threatened with evil, chaos, and destructive forces.[8] His avatars most notably include Rama
Rama
in the Ramayana
Ramayana
and Krishna
Krishna
in the Mahabharata
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Havan
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Vaastu
Vastu shastra
Vastu shastra
(vāstu śāstra) is a traditional Hindu system of architecture[3] which literally translates to "science of architecture."[4] These are texts found on the Indian subcontinent that describe principles of design, layout, measurements, ground preparation, space arrangement and spatial geometry.[5][6] Vastu Shastras incorporate traditional Hindu and in some cases Buddhist beliefs.[7] The designs are intended to integrate architecture with nature, the relative functions of various parts of the structure, and ancient beliefs utilizing geometric patterns (yantra), symmetry and directional alignments.[8][9] Vastu Shastra
Shastra
are the textual part of Vastu Vidya, the latter being the broader knowledge about architecture and design theories from ancient India.[10] Vastu Vidya knowledge is a collection of ideas and concepts, with or without the support of layout diagrams, that are not rigid
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Mahabhuta
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-DussehraRaksha Bandhan Ganesh Chat
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Chakra
Chakras (Sanskrit: चक्र, IAST: cakra, Pali: cakka, lit. wheel, circle), are focal points in the subtle body used in a variety of meditation techniques in the esoteric traditions of Indian religions and used in new age medicine and psychology.[2][3][4] The concept is found particularly in the tantric traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism. They are treated as focal points, or psychic nodes in the subtle body of the practitioner
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Prithvi
Prithvi
Prithvi
or Prithvi
Prithvi
Mata (Sanskrit: पृथ्वी, pṛthvī, also pṛthivī) "the Vast One" is the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
name for the earth as well as the name of a devi (goddess) in Hinduism
Hinduism
and some branches of Buddhism. As Pṛthvī Mātā ("Mother Earth") she is complementary to Dyauṣ Pitā ("Father Sky"). In the Rigveda, Earth
Earth
and Sky are primarily addressed in the dual as Dyavapṛthivi.[1] She is associated with the cow
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Agni
Deva, AdityasAbode AgnilokaWeapon StaffMount Ram[3]Personal informationConsort Goddess Svaha[4]SiblingsIndra,Brihaspati,Varuna,Vayu, Dyaus,Bhudevi,Chandra Agni
Agni
(/ˈæɡni/ AG-nee[5], Sanskrit: अग्नि) means fire, and connotes the Vedic fire god of Hinduism.[6][7][8] Agni
Agni

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Ganesha
Ganesha
Ganesha
(/ɡəˈneɪʃə/; Sanskrit: गणेश, Gaṇeśa;  listen (help·info)), also known as Ganapati, Vinayaka, Pillaiyar and Binayak, is one of the best-known and most worshiped deities in the Hindu
Hindu
pantheon.[4] His image is found throughout India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Nepal.[5] Hindu denominations
Hindu denominations
worship him regardless of affiliations.[6] Devotion to Ganesha
Ganesha
is widely diffused and extends to Jains and Buddhists.[7] Although he is known by many attributes, Ganesha's elephant head makes him easy to identify.[8] Ganesha
Ganesha
is widely revered as the remover of obstacles,[9] the patron of arts and sciences and the deva of intellect and wisdom.[10] As the god of beginnings, he is honoured at the start of rites and ceremonies
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Vayu
Vāyu (Sanskrit, Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [ʋaːju]) is a primary Hindu
Hindu
deity, the lord of the winds, the father of Bhima
Bhima
and the spiritual father of Hanuman. He is also known as Anil ("Air, Wind"), Vyān (Air), Vāta ("Airy Element"), Tanun (The Wind), Pavan ("The Purifier"),[1] and sometimes Prāṇa ("The Breath").Contents1 Connotations 2 Hindu
Hindu
texts and philosophy 3 Buddhism 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 ReferencesConnotations[edit] The word for air (vāyu) or wind (pavana) is one of the classical elements in Hinduism. The Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word 'Vāta' literally means "blown", 'Vāyu' "blower", and Prāna "breathing" (viz. the breath of life, cf. the *an- in 'animate')
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