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Philippine Cuisine
Filipino cuisine
Filipino cuisine
(Filipino: Lutuing Filipino or Pagkaing Filipino) is composed of the cuisines of 144 distinct ethno-linguistic groups found within the Philippine archipelago, however, majority of mainstream Filipino dishes that compose Filipino cuisine
Filipino cuisine
are from the cuisines of the Bikol, Chabakano, Hiligaynon, Ilokano, Kapampangan, Meranaw, Pangasinan, Sebwano (or Bisaya), Tagalog, and Waray ethno-linguistic tribes
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American Cuisine
The cuisine of the United States
United States
reflects its history. The European settlement of the Americas yielded the introduction of a number of various ingredients, spices, herbs and cooking styles to the latter. The various styles continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations; such influx developed a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country. Early Native Americans
Americans
utilized a number of cooking methods in early American Cuisine
Cuisine
that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of American Cuisine. When the colonists came to the colonies, they farmed animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. They had cuisine similar to their previous British cuisine
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Filipino Language
Filipino /ˌfɪlɪˈpiːnoʊ/ ( listen)[4] (Wikang Filipino [wɪ'kɐŋ ˌfiːliˈpiːno]), in this usage, refers to the national language (Wikang pambansa/Pambansang wika) of the Philippines. Filipino is also designated, along with English, as an official language of the country.[5] It is based on the Tagalog language,[6] an Austronesian, regional language that is widely spoken in the Philippines
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Filipino Martial Arts
Filipino martial arts
Filipino martial arts
(FMA) (Filipino: Sining sa pagtatanggol) refer to ancient Indianized and newer fighting methods devised in the Philippines. It incorporates elements from both Western and Eastern Martial Arts, the most popular forms of which are known as Arnis, Eskrima and Kali. The intrinsic need for self-preservation was the genesis of these systems. Throughout the ages, invaders and evolving local conflict imposed new dynamics for combat in the islands now making up the Philippines. The Filipino people developed battle skills as a direct result of an appreciation of their ever-changing circumstances. They learned often out of necessity how to prioritize, allocate and use common resources in combative situations. Filipinos have been heavily influenced by a phenomenon of cultural and linguistic mixture
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Rugby Union In The Philippines
Rugby union
Rugby union
in the Philippines
Philippines
is a minor but growing sport.Contents1 Governing body 2
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List Of World Heritage Sites In The Philippines
The UNESCO
UNESCO
(United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) has designated six World Heritage Sites in the Philippines. The UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Sites are places of importance to cultural or natural heritage as described in the UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage Convention. The Philippines, following its ratification of the convention on Thursday, September 19, 1985, made its historical and natural sites eligible for inclusion on the list. The Philippines
Philippines
had its first sites included in 1993, and since 2014, has six sites on the list spanning nine locations. Of those six sites, three are cultural and three natural
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Lists Of Cultural Properties Of The Philippines
These lists contain an overview of the government recognized Cultural Properties in the Philippines. The lists are based on the official lists provided by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts, National Historical Commission of the Philippines, and the National Museum of the Philippines
Philippines
through PRECUP (Philippine Registry of Cultural Property), the official cultural property list of the Republic of the Philippines. All LGU's are also mandated to submit a partial or full list of each LGU's cultural properties, however, only 39 out of the 1,934 cities and municipalities in the country have submitted such a list as of November 2017. A partial reason for this major LGU participation lacking is the non-existence of a holistic Department of Culture
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List Of Historical Markers Of The Philippines
Historical markers
Historical markers
(Filipino: panandang pangkasaysayan) are installed by the National Historical Commission of the Philippines
National Historical Commission of the Philippines
(NHCP) in the Philippines and places abroad that signify important events, persons,[1][2] structures,[3] and institutions in Philippine national and local histories.[4] The plaques themselves are permanent signs installed by the NHCP in publicly visible locations on buildings, monuments, or in special locations. Local municipalities and cities can also install markers of figures and events of local significance. Though they may have the permission of the NHCP, these markers are barred from using the seal of the Republic of the Philippines.[5] While many Cultural Properties have historical markers installed, not all places marked with historical markers are designated into one of the particular categories of Cultural Properties
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National Symbols Of The Philippines
The national symbols of the Philippines
Philippines
consist of symbols that represent Philippine traditions and ideals and convey the principles of sovereignty and national solidarity of the Filipino people.[1] Some of these symbols are stated in the Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines, which is also known as Republic Act 8491.[1] The national language of the Philippines
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Flag Of The Philippines
The National Flag of the Philippines
Philippines
(Filipino: Pambansang Watawat ng Pilipinas) is a horizontal flag bicolor with equal bands of royal blue and scarlet, and with a white, equilateral triangle at the hoist
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Coat Of Arms Of The Philippines
The Coat of Arms of the Philippines
Philippines
(Filipino: Sagisag ng Pilipinas) or sometimes in (Spanish: Escudo de Filipinas) features the eight-rayed sun of the Philippines
Philippines
with each ray representing the eight provinces (Batangas, Bulacan, Cavite, Manila, Laguna, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga
Pampanga
and Tarlac) which were placed under martial law by Governor-General Ramón Blanco during the Philippine Revolution, and the three five-pointed stars representing the three primary geographic regions of Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao. On the blue field on the dexter side is the North American bald eagle of the United States, and on the red field on the sinister side is the lion rampant of the coat of arms of the Kingdom of León, both representing the country's colonial past. The current arms, which shares many features of the national flag, was designed by Filipino artist and heraldist Captain Galo B
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Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan At Makabansa
Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan at Makabansa
Maka-Diyos, Maka-Tao, Makakalikasan at Makabansa
("For God, People, Nature and Country") is the national motto of the Philippines. Derived from the last four lines of the Pledge of Allegiance to the Philippine Flag, it was adopted on February 12, 1998 with the passage of Republic Act No. 8491, the Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines, during the presidency of Fidel V
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Lupang Hinirang
"Lupang Hinirang" ([ˈlupaŋ hiˈniɾaŋ]; originally in Spanish: Patria Adorada [ˈpatɾja aðoˈɾaða]; English: Chosen Land) is the national anthem of the Philippines. Its music was composed in 1898 by Julián Felipe, and the lyrics were adapted from the Spanish poem Filipinas, written by José Palma in 1899. Originally written it did not have lyrics when it was adopted as the anthem of the revolutionary First Philippine Republic
First Philippine Republic
and subsequently played during the proclamation of Philippine independence on June 12, 1898. Under the American period, the Flag Act of 1907 prohibited the public display of flags, banners, emblems, or devices used by revolutionaries in the Philippine–American War.[1] Under this law, the colonial government banned the song from being played.[2] The Flag Law was repealed in 1919
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Jasminum Sambac
Jasminum
Jasminum
sambac, the Arabian jasmine, is a species of jasmine native to a small region in the eastern Himalayas
Himalayas
in Bhutan
Bhutan
and neighbouring Bangladesh, India
India
and Pakistan. It is cultivated in many places, especially across much of South and Southeast Asia. It is naturalised in many scattered locales: Mauritius, Madagascar, the Maldives, Cambodia, Indonesia, Christmas Island, Chiapas, Central America, southern Florida, the Bahamas, Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the Lesser Antilles.[3][4][5] Jasminum
Jasminum
sambac is a small shrub or vine growing up to 0.5 to 3 m (1.6 to 9.8 ft) in height. It is widely cultivated for its attractive and sweetly fragrant flowers. The flowers may be used as a fragrant ingredient in perfumes and jasmine tea
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Volleyball In The Philippines
Neolithic
Neolithic
ageCallao and Tabon peoples Arrival of the Negritos Austronesian expansion Angono Petroglyphs Lal-lo and Gattaran Shell Middens Jade cultureIron ageSa Huyun Culture Society of the Igorot Ancient barangaysEvents/ArtifactsBalangay grave goods Manunggul Jar Prehistoric gems Sa Huyun-Kalanay Complex Maitum Anthropomorphic PotteryArchaic epoch (900–1565) Historically documented city-states/polities (by geography from North to South)Samtoy chieftaincy Caboloan Tondo Namayan Rajahnate of Maynila Ma-i Madja-as Chiefdom of Taytay Rajahnate of
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Pterocarpus Indicus
Pterocarpus
Pterocarpus
indicus (commonly known as Amboyna wood, Malay padauk, Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
rosewood, Philippine mahogany, Andaman redwood, Burmese rosewood, narra[3] or Pashu padauk) is a species of Pterocarpus
Pterocarpus
native to southeastern Asia, northern Australasia, and the western Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
islands, in Cambodia, southernmost China, East Timor, Indonesia, Malaysia,[4] Papua New Guinea, the Philippines, the Ryukyu Islands, the Solomon Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.[5] Pterocarpus
Pterocarpus
indicus was one of two species (the other being Eysenhardtia polystacha) used as a source for the 16th- to 18th-century traditional diuretic known as lignum nephriticum.[6] Many populations of Pterocarpus
Pterocarpus
indicus are seriously threatened
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