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Parang Chandong
Parang Chandong
Parang Chandong
(also spelled as Parang Candong, Parang Candung, Duku Candong or Duku Candung) is a traditional chopper used by the Dayak people (Iban people[1]) of the Baram River
Baram River
in Borneo. The Parang Candung is also the primary weapon of Sari Panji, a character in the Rajé Ngalam tale of Sambas Regency, West Kalimantan, Indonesia.[2] Recently in the west, the Parang Chandong
Parang Chandong
was popularized by Raymond Mears and is sometimes referred to as Ray Mears Parang. This parang is also not to be confused with the Candung in Lampung language, which refers to another type of golok in Lampung, Indonesia. Description[edit] The blade's edge is convex. The back is concave and curves towards the edge at the point. The centre of gravity lies near to the tip. The wooden scabbard's two parts are held together by means of rattan strips
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Borneo
Borneo
Borneo
(/ˈbɔːrnioʊ/; Malay: Pulau Borneo, Indonesian: Kalimantan) is the third-largest island in the world and the largest in Asia.[note 1] At the geographic centre of Maritime Southeast Asia, in relation to major Indonesian islands, it is located north of Java, west of Sulawesi, and east of Sumatra. The island is politically divided among three countries: Malaysia
Malaysia
and Brunei
Brunei
in the north, and Indonesia
Indonesia
to the south.[1] Approximately 73% of the island is Indonesian territory. In the north, the East Malaysian states of Sabah
Sabah
and Sarawak
Sarawak
make up about 26% of the island. Additionally, the Malaysian federal territory of Labuan
Labuan
is situated on a small island just off the coast of Borneo
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Palitai
Palitai
Palitai
(or Palite, Parittei, Pattei) is the traditional knife of the Mentawai people, originating from the Mentawai Islands[1] off West Sumatra, Indonesia. Description[edit]A Mentawai man seen with a traditional knife, Palitai
Palitai
at the waist.The Palitai
Palitai
has a straight and double edged blade. The handle is uniquely long, slim and curiously curved in shape.[2] It is a knife with a smooth blade on both edges of which are sharpened and run parallel. The edges come together at the tip to the end in a sharp point. The blade has in the middle along the entire length an elevated rib. The steel used to produce blades was imported from Sumatra, as forging was unknown on Mentawai islands. The blades were finished in the desired form on the spot. The total length may vary from 30 cm to 1 m
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Pandat
Pandat
Pandat
(other names also include Kamping, Parang Pandat, Parang Pandit or Mandau Tangkitn) is the war sword of the Dayak people
Dayak people
of northwest Borneo
Borneo
(Sarawak, Malaysia and West Kalimantan, Indonesia) and is never used as a tool.Contents1 Description 2 Use 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDescription[edit] The Pandat
Pandat
has a short, heavy, single-edge blade with an iron hilt.[1] It has no real handle, but a short cross-piece of iron or bone passes through the handle.[2] The sword is handled with one or two hands, with a downward stroke. Its blade and hilt are forged from one piece and the blade is bent, just before the hilt, at an angle of 25 degrees. The bend in the blade is located in the transitional part between the blade and the hilt. Both the back and the edge are straight and run apart, so that the blade's broadest part is at the point
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Parang Nabur
Parang Nabur
Parang Nabur
(other names also include Belabang or Beladah, while older variants are called Pacat Gantung or Pacat Bagantung) is a sword that originates from Banjarmasin, South Kalimantan, Indonesia. Most of this sword is made during the Banjarmasin
Banjarmasin
Sultanate period in the 19th century.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 Further readingDescription[edit] The Parang Nabur
Parang Nabur
is a sword with a curve blade broadening towards the point, with its widest section at the curvature.[1] The edge is convex, the back is concave. It has a double edge for about 2/3 to 3/8 of the blade from its front tip. The edge may bend towards the back or the back may bend towards the edge at the point. The hilt is usually made of horn or bone, sometimes of wood, and often has a protection for the hand and fingers made of brass or iron
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Piso Halasan
A Piso Halasan
Piso Halasan
(also known as an Eccat, Ekkat, Engkat, or Piso Eccat) is a traditional sword of the Batak people
Batak people
from North Tapanuli Regency, North Sumatra, Indonesia.Contents1 Description 2 Cultural 3 References 4 Further readingDescription[edit] A Piso Halasan
Piso Halasan
is typically a sword with a hilt made of deer horn or antelope horn, although horn-shaped hilts of cast metal are also found. The blade is made of a mixture of several kinds of metal and is used as a deadly weapon in battles.[1] It has a straight back and a narrow point. Its broadest part is near the point, and there is a notch near the hilt
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Rudus
A Rudus
Rudus
is a sword or cutlass associated with the Malay culture
Malay culture
of Sumatra. Together with the pemandap, the rudus is among the largest swords of Malay people. Rudus
Rudus
is also a symbol of certain Malay state in the Island, e.g. the Province of Bengkulu
Bengkulu
in Sumatra, Indonesia.[1]Contents1 Description 2 Form 3 References 4 Cited worksDescription[edit] The rudus is associated with the Islamic Malay culture. It is found to be more common in Sumatra
Sumatra
than in the Malay peninsula. Together with the pemandap, the rudus is considered to be a symbol of the Sumatran Malay culture. The Acehnese people
Acehnese people
and the Malay of Bengkulu
Bengkulu
are recorded to have the rudus as their cultural identity
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Sikin Panyang
Sikin Panjang
Sikin Panjang
(also known as Sikin Panyang, Gloepak Sikin, Glupak Sikin, Jekinpandjang, Loedjoe Aceh, Loedjoe Atjeh, Loedjoe Naru, Ludju Naru, Narumo, Sekin Pandjang, Sekin Panjang, Sekin Pandjang, Sekin Panjang Meutatah, Thikin Panjang) is a sword originating from northern Sumatra, Indonesia.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] Further information: Aceh
Aceh
War The Sikin Panjang
Sikin Panjang
is the most popular fighting weapon of the inhabitants of northern Sumatra. In the early years of the Aceh
Aceh
War against the Dutch (which began in 1873 and lasted for over thirty years) many Sikins were made, especially prior to 1879 when a start was made with disarmament of the population
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Kalis
A kalis (Baybayin: ᜃᜎᜒ or ᜃᜎᜒᜐ᜔; Abecedario: cáli, cális) is a type of double-edged Filipino sword, often with a "wavy" section, similar to a kris. Just like the kris, the Kalis's double-edged blade can be used for both cutting and thrusting; except that the Kalis is much larger than most Kerises, making it a sword rather than a dagger. The wavy portion of the kalis is said to be meant to facilitate easier slashing in battle - since a straight edge tends to get stuck in the opponent's bones, the wavy portion allows the kalis' bearer to more easily pull the weapon out of his opponent's body.[1]Contents1 History 2 Physical description2.1 Blade 2.2 Guard (gangya) 2.3 Hilt 2.4 Scabbard3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] It is believed that the predecessor of the keris first appeared in the 13th century, originally from the island of Java in Indonesia
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Surik (sword)
The surik is a traditional sword of the island of Timor. The first coat of arms of East Timor depicts crossed suriks.Contents1 Description 2 Cultural 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingDescription[edit] The surik has a single edge blade. The width of the blade narrows from the base down to the tip. Most of the handle is made from horn, and is decorated with tassels to look tough. Goat's hair or horse's hair is attached to the handle. Carving an eye at the center of the handle is meant to strengthen its supernatural power. The sheath of this sword is made of wood. A surik sword used along with a long curved shield is called surik samara.[1] Cultural[edit] For the Belu people of Nusa Tenggara, the surik is considered as a sacred sword
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Badik
The badik or badek is a knife or dagger developed by the Bugis and Makassar people
Makassar people
of southern Sulawesi, Indonesia.Contents1 Description 2 Culture2.1 Duels3 Techniques 4 References 5 Further readingDescription[edit] The badik consists of three parts, namely the handle and blade, as well as the sheath or scabbard. It comes in a great variety of shapes and sizes. The badik can have a straight, curved, bulbous or wavy, single- or double-edged blade. The blade is smooth or with hollow sections (fullered). The point of the blade can be either pointed or rounded. Like the kris, the shape of the blade is asymmetric and often shows patterns typical of pamor (pattern welding steel commonly known as Damascus steel).[1][2] However, it differs from the kris in that the badik does not have a ganja (a buffer strip steel). Some versions from Sulawesi
Sulawesi
are decorated with inlaid gold figure on the blade called jeko
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Kris
Javanese (mainly & originally) * Also familiar to Malays, Filipinos, Sundanese, Banjar, Madurese, Balinese, Moro, Siamese, Bugis, MakassarWars Pamalayu expedition, Mongol invasion of Java, Battle of Bubat, Majapahit
Majapahit
civil war, Burmese-Siamese wars, Siege of Batavia, Diponegoro War, Indonesian National Revolution, Spanish–Moro conflict, Philippine–American War, Pacific WarProduction historyProduced disputed (?) to presentVariants KalisSpecificationsBlade type Double edged nickelous iron or steelHilt type Ivory, bone, horn, wooden or metals. Sometimes coated with gold or silver and decorated with gemstonesScabbard/sheath Wooden frame covered and decorated with ivory or metals (gold, silver, copper, iron, brass, or steel)This article contains letters from the Javanese script
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Kujang (weapon)
The kujang is a blade weapon native to the Sundanese people of western Java, Indonesia. The earliest kujang made is from around the 8th or 9th century. It is forged out of iron, steel and pattern welding steel with a length of approximately 20–25 cm and weighs about 300 grams. According to Sanghyang siksakanda ng karesian canto XVII, the kujang was the weapon of farmers and has its roots in agricultural use. It is thought to have originated from its predecessor, a kudi.[1] The kujang is one of the traditional weapons in the Sundanese school of pencak silat
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Peurawot
Peurawot (also known as Porawet, Sikin Peurawot, Sikin Rawot) is a traditional whittling knife[1] of the Acehnese people from Aceh, Indonesia.[2] Description[edit] The Peurawot has a single edge blade with a slight curvature. The width of the blade is about the same from the base to the tip of the blade. The blade does not have a central ridge and back of the blade is somewhat concave. The cutting edge of the blade is a little concave in shape. This knife is sometimes adorned with a golden or suasa sampa (decoration of the hilt near the blade) and tampo (knob of the hilt).[3] References[edit]^ Abu Bakar, Pusat Bahasa (Indonesia), Balai Pustaka (Persero) (2001). Kamus bahasa Aceh-Indonesia. PT Balai Pustaka. ISBN 979-666-646-4. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) ^ Amir Mertosedono (1987). Mengenal Senjata Tradisional Kita. Dahara Prize. ASIN B0000D7JZJ.  ^ Albert G Van Zonneveld (2002). Traditional Weapons of the Indonesian Archipelago
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Mandau (knife)
Mandau[1] is the traditional weapon of the Dayak people
Dayak people
of Borneo.[2][3] Sometimes it is also known as Parang Ilang among the Bidayuh, Iban and Penan people, Malat by the Kayan people or Baieng by the Kenyah people
Kenyah people
or Bandau by Lun Bawang
Lun Bawang
or Pelepet/Felepet by Lundayeh. Mandau is mostly ceremonial
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Pisau Raut
Pisau raut
Pisau raut
(pisau meaning 'knife'; raut meaning 'rattan') is a Dayak whittling-knife that serves as a tool to prepare the rattan found in the island of Kalimantan
Kalimantan
in Indonesia. It is placed in the same sheath as the mandau, the traditional weapon of the Dayak people. Despite being placed in the same scabbard sheath as the weapon mandau, the pisau raut is mostly used as a crafting tool.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 Cited worksDescription[edit]A Dayak style pisau raut typically seen accompanying a Mandau sword (left) and a Malay style pisau raut (right) from Malay Peninsula, circa 18th-19th century. Pisau raut
Pisau raut
is found throughout the Island of Kalimantan
Kalimantan
of Indonesia. It is variously known under different names by different Dayak tribes: munbat for the Iban tribe, langgei for the Ngaju, jabang for the Dayak of Baranjan, etc
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