HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Pangaea
Pangaea
Pangaea
or Pangea ( /pænˈdʒiːə/[1]) was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic
Paleozoic
and early Mesozoic
Mesozoic
eras.[2][3] It assembled from earlier continental units approximately 335 million years ago, and it began to break apart about 175 million years ago.[4] In contrast to the present Earth
Earth
and its distribution of continental mass, much of Pangaea
Pangaea
was in the southern hemisphere and surrounded by a superocean, Panthalassa
[...More...]

"Pangaea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ediacaran Biota
The Ediacaran
Ediacaran
(/ˌiːdiˈækərən/; formerly Vendian) biota consisted of enigmatic tubular and frond-shaped, mostly sessile organisms that lived during the Ediacaran
Ediacaran
Period (ca. 635–542 Mya). Trace fossils of these organisms have been found worldwide, and represent the earliest known complex multicellular organisms.[note 1] The Ediacaran biota may have radiated in a proposed event called the Avalon explosion, 575 million years ago,[1][2] after the Earth had thawed from the Cryogenian period's extensive glaciation. The biota largely disappeared with the rapid increase in biodiversity known as the Cambrian
Cambrian
explosion. Most of the currently existing body plans of animals first appeared in the fossil record of the Cambrian
Cambrian
rather than the Ediacaran
[...More...]

"Ediacaran Biota" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Archean
The Archean
Archean
Eon ( /ɑːrˈkiːən/, also spelled Archaean) is a geologic eon, 4,000 to 2,500 million years ago (4 to 2.5 billion years), that followed the Hadean
Hadean
Eon and preceded the Proterozoic
Proterozoic
Eon. During the Archean, the Earth's crust had cooled enough to allow the formation of continents.Contents1 Etymology and changes in classification 2 Earth
Earth
at the beginning of the Archean2.1 Palaeoenvironment3 Geology 4 Early life in the Archean 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology and changes in classification[edit] Archean
Archean
(or Archaean) comes from the ancient Greek Αρχή (Arkhē), meaning "beginning, origin"
[...More...]

"Archean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Great Oxygenation Event
The Great Oxygenation Event, the beginning of which is commonly known in scientific media as the Great Oxidation
Oxidation
Event (GOE, also called the Oxygen Catastrophe, Oxygen Crisis, Oxygen Holocaust,[2] Oxygen Revolution, or Great Oxidation) was the biologically induced appearance of dioxygen (O2) in Earth's atmosphere.[3] Geological, isotopic, and chemical evidence suggest that this major environmental change happened around 2.45 billion years ago (2.45 Ga),[4] during the Siderian
[...More...]

"Great Oxygenation Event" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mother Goddess
A mother goddess is a goddess who represents, or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth
Earth
or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth
Earth
or as the Earth
Earth
Mother. There is difference of opinion between the academic and the popular conception of the term. The popular view is mainly driven by the Goddess
Goddess
movement and reads that primitive societies initially were matriarchal, worshipping a sovereign, nurturing, motherly earth goddess. This was based upon the nineteenth-century ideas of unilineal evolution of Johann Jakob Bachofen
[...More...]

"Mother Goddess" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cambrian Explosion
The Cambrian
Cambrian
explosion or Cambrian
Cambrian
radiation[1] was an event approximately 541 million years ago in the Cambrian
Cambrian
period when most major animal phyla appeared in the fossil record.[2][3] It lasted for about 20[4][5]–25[6][7] million years
[...More...]

"Cambrian Explosion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human
Homo
Homo
sapiens idaltu White et al., 2003 Homo
Homo
sapiens sapiens Homo
Homo
sapiens population densitySynonyms Species
Species
synonymy[1]aethiopicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 americanus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 arabicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 aurignacensis Klaatsch & Hauser, 1910 australasicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cafer Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 capensis Broom, 1917 columbicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 cro-magnonensis Gregory, 1921 drennani Kleinschmidt, 1931 eurafricanus (Sergi, 1911) grimaldiensis Gregory, 1921 grimaldii Lapouge, 1906 hottentotus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 hyperboreus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 indicus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 japeticus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 melaninus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 monstrosus Linnaeus, 1758 neptunianus Bory de St. Vincent, 1825 palestinus McCown & Keith, 1932 patagonus Bory de St
[...More...]

"Human" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gya
A billion years (109 years) is a unit of time on the petasecond scale, more precisely equal to 7016316000000000000♠3.16×1016 seconds. It is sometimes abbreviated Gy, Ga ("giga-annum"), Byr and variants. The abbreviations Gya or bya are for "billion years ago", i.e. billion years before present.[1] The terms are used in geology, paleontology, geophysics, astronomy and physical cosmology. The prefix giga- is preferred over billion- to avoid confusion in the long and short scales over the meaning of billion; the postfix annum may be further qualified for precision as a sidereal year or Julian year:1 Gaj=7016315576000000000♠3.15576×1016 s, 1 Gas=7016315580999999999♠3.15581×1016 s (epoch J2000.0).Byr was formerly used in English-language
English-language
geology and astronomy as a unit of one billion years
[...More...]

"Gya" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Proterozoic
The Proterozoic
Proterozoic
( /ˌproʊtərəˈzoʊɪk, prɔː-, -trə-/[1][2]) is a geological eon representing the time just before the proliferation of complex life on Earth. The name Proterozoic
Proterozoic
comes from Greek and means "earlier life": the Greek root "protero-" means "former, earlier" and "zoic-" means "animal, living being".[3] The Proterozoic Eon extended from 7016788940000000000♠2500 Ma to 7016170726616000000♠541 Ma (million years ago), and is the most recent part of the Precambrian
Precambrian
Supereon. It can be also described as the time range between the appearance of oxygen in Earth's atmosphere and the appearance of first complex life forms (like trilobites or corals)
[...More...]

"Proterozoic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hadean
The Hadean
Hadean
( /ˈheɪdiən/) is a geologic eon of the Earth
Earth
predating the Archean. It began with the formation of the Earth
Earth
about 4.6 billion years ago and ended, as defined by the ICS, 4 billion years ago.[1] As of 2016[update], the ICS describes its status as informal.[2] The geologist Preston Cloud coined the term in 1972, originally to label the period before the earliest-known rocks on Earth. W. Brian Harland later coined an almost synonymous term: the "Priscoan period"
[...More...]

"Hadean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Late Heavy Bombardment
The Late Heavy Bombardment
Late Heavy Bombardment
(abbreviated LHB and also known as the lunar cataclysm) is an event thought to have occurred approximately 4.1 to 3.8 billion years (Ga) ago,[1] at a time corresponding to the Neohadean
Neohadean
and Eoarchean
Eoarchean
eras on Earth. During this interval, a disproportionately large number of asteroids are theorized to have collided with the early terrestrial planets in the inner Solar System, including Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars.[2] The Late Heavy Bombardment
Late Heavy Bombardment
happened after the Earth
Earth
and other rocky planets had formed and accreted most of their mass, but still quite early in Earth's history. Evidence for the LHB derives from lunar samples brought back by the Apollo astronauts
[...More...]

"Late Heavy Bombardment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mesoarchean
The Mesoarchean (/ˌmiːzoʊɑːrˈkiːən/, also spelled Mesoarchaean) is a geologic era within the Archean
Archean
Eon, spanning 3,200 to 2,800 million years ago. The era is defined chronometrically and is not referenced to a specific level in a rock section on Earth. Fossils from Australia
Australia
show that stromatolites have lived on Earth since the Mesoarchean
[...More...]

"Mesoarchean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Huronian Glaciation
The Huronian glaciation (or Makganyene glaciation)[1] was a glaciation that extended from 2.4 billion years ago (Ga) to 2.1 Ga, during the Siderian
Siderian
and Rhyacian periods of the Paleoproterozoic era. The Huronian glaciation followed the Great Oxygenation Event
Great Oxygenation Event
(GOE), a time when increased atmospheric oxygen decreased atmospheric methane. The oxygen combined with the methane to form carbon dioxide and water, which do not retain heat as well as methane does. It is the oldest and longest ice age, occurring at a time when only simple, unicellular life existed on Earth
[...More...]

"Huronian Glaciation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cryogenian
The Cryogenian ( /kraɪoʊˈdʒɛniən/, from Greek κρύος (krýos), meaning "cold" and γένεσις (génesis), meaning "birth") is a geologic period that lasted from 720 to 635 million years ago.[9] It forms the second geologic period of the Neoproterozoic Era, preceded by the Tonian Period and followed by the Ediacaran. The Sturtian and Marinoan glaciations occurred during the Cryogenian period,[10] which are the greatest ice ages known to have occurred on Earth
[...More...]

"Cryogenian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Andean-Saharan Glaciation
The Andean-Saharan glaciation occurred during the Paleozoic
Paleozoic
from 450 Ma to 420 Ma, during the late Ordovician
Ordovician
and the Silurian
Silurian
period. According to Eyles and Young, "A major glacial episode at c. 440 Ma, is recorded in Late Ordovician
Ordovician
strata (predominantly Ashgillian) in West Africa ( Tamadjert
Tamadjert
Formation of the Sahara), in Morocco (Tindouf Basin) and in west-central Saudi Arabia, all areas at polar latitudes at the time. From the Late Ordovician
Ordovician
to the Early Silurian
Silurian
the centre of glaciation moved from northern Africa to southwestern South America."[1] During this period glaciation is known from Arabia, Sahara, West Africa, the south Amazon, and the Andes
[...More...]

"Andean-Saharan Glaciation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Quaternary Glaciation
The Quaternary
Quaternary
glaciation, also known as the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
glaciation or the current ice age, is a series of glacial events separated by interglacial events during the Quaternary
Quaternary
period from 2.58 Ma (million years ago) to present.[1] During this period, ice sheets expanded, notably from out of Antarctica
Antarctica
and Greenland, and fluctuating ice sheets occurred elsewhere (for example, the Laurentide ice sheet). The major effects of the ice age were the erosion of land and the deposition of material, both over large parts of the continents; the modification of river systems; the creation of millions of lakes, changes in sea level, the development of pluvial lakes far from the ice margins, the isostatic adjustment of the earth's crust, flooding, and abnormal winds
[...More...]

"Quaternary Glaciation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.