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One Eye River
The One-Eye River
River
is a river in the parishes of Manchester and St Elizabeth in Jamaica. It is a tributary of the Black River.Contents1 Course 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksCourse[edit] The hydrology of the area is complex, with several sinks and risings. As a consequence, different sources give different interpretations. Directorate of Overseas Surveys 1:50,000 map[1]Extract from UK Directorate of Overseas Surveys 50K map of Jamaica showing the One Eye River.The Directorate of Overseas Surveys published several editions of a 1:50,000 scale map of the island from the 1950s on. Sheet D of the first edition shows the One Eye River
River
rising a little north of Oxford Cave and a little south of Auchtembeddie. From here it flows south to a point a little north of Oxford railway halt where it is joined by Rotten Gut River, its only tributary
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Jamaica
Jamaica
Jamaica
(/dʒəˈmeɪkə/ ( listen)) is an island country situated in the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. Spanning 10,990 square kilometres (4,240 sq mi) in area, it is the third-largest island of the Greater Antilles
Greater Antilles
and the fourth-largest island country in the Caribbean. Jamaica
Jamaica
lies about 145 kilometres (90 mi) south of Cuba, and 191 kilometres (119 mi) west of Hispaniola
Hispaniola
(the island containing the countries of Haiti
Haiti
and the Dominican Republic). Previously inhabited by the indigenous Arawak
Arawak
and Taíno
Taíno
peoples, the island came under Spanish rule following the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1494
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Hydrology
Hydrology
Hydrology
is the scientific study of the movement, distribution, and quality of water on Earth
Earth
and other planets, including the water cycle, water resources and environmental watershed sustainability. A practitioner of hydrology is a hydrologist, working within the fields of earth or environmental science, physical geography, geology or civil and environmental engineering.[1] Using various analytical methods and scientific techniques, they collect and analyze data to help solve water related problems such as environmental preservation, natural disasters, and water management.[2] Hydrology
Hydrology
subdivides into surface water hydrology, groundwater hydrology (hydrogeology), and marine hydrology
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River Mouth
A river mouth is the part of a river where the river flows into another river, a lake, a reservoir, a sea, or an ocean.[citation needed]Contents1 Water motion 2 Landforms 3 Cultural influence 4 See also 5 ReferencesWater motion[edit] The water from a river can enter the receiving body in a variety of different ways.[1] The motion of the river mainly depends on the relative density of the river compared to the receiving water and any ambient motion in the receiving water, such as tides or seiches.[citation needed] If the river water is denser than the surface of the receiving water, the river water will plunge below the surface at the plunge curve
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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University Of The West Indies Press
The University of the West Indies Press (or UWI Press) is a university press that is part of the University of the West Indies. References[edit]^ Ordering InformationExternal links[edit]University of the West Indies PressThis Caribbean-related university, college or other education institution article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about a publishing company is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis Jamaica-related article is a stub
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Coffee River Cave
Coffee River Cave is a large river cave in Manchester Parish in west-central Jamaica. It is 2800 metres in length and at an altitude of 250 metres.Contents1 Natural history 2 See also 3 External links 4 ReferencesNatural history[edit] The cave is a large bat roost, and some bat guano is harvested from the outer regions of the cave. See also[edit]List of caves#Jamaica Jamaican Caves Organisation Manchester Parish, JamaicaExternal links[edit]Aerial view. Photos: [1]. Video: [2] [3]. Coffee River Cave - Jamaican Caves Organisation.References[edit]^ a b Stewart, R S (2005-05-12). "Coffee River Cave- Field Notes". Jamaican Caves Organisation
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Oxford Cave, Jamaica
Oxford Cave is a cave in Manchester Parish in west-central Jamaica. It is 765 metres long and at 290 metres altitude.[1] The cave entrance is close by a main road and because of its accessibility has suffered much graffiti, vandalism and litter.[1] It is a roost for a great many bats, but these are under threat from the number of anti-social human visitors, many there to collect bat guano to use as farm fertiliser, others for bashments.[1] See also[edit]List of caves#Jamaica Jamaican Caves Organisation Manchester Parish, JamaicaExternal links[edit]Map. Aerial view. Photo. Oxford Cave Field Notes.References[edit]^ a b c d e f g Stewart, R S (2006-06-06). "Oxford Cave - Field Notes". Jamaican Caves Organisation
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Directorate Of Overseas Surveys
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
International and its predecessors built an archive of air photography, map and survey records for the United Kingdom from 1946 to 1999
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Kingston, Jamaica
Kingston is the capital and largest city of Jamaica, located on the southeastern coast of the island. It faces a natural harbour protected by the Palisadoes, a long sand spit which connects the town of Port Royal and the Norman Manley International Airport
Norman Manley International Airport
to the rest of the island. In the Americas, Kingston is the largest predominantly English-speaking city south of the United States. The local government bodies of the parishes of Kingston and St. Andrew were amalgamated by the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation Act of 1923, to form the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC). Greater Kingston, or the "Corporate Area" refers to those areas under the KSAC; however, it does not solely refer to Kingston Parish, which only consists of the old downtown and Port Royal. Kingston Parish had a population of 96,052, and St
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Saint Elizabeth Parish
St. Elizabeth, one of Jamaica's largest parishes, is located in the southwest of the island, in the county of Cornwall. Its capital, Black River, is located at the mouth of the Black River, the widest on the island.Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Demography3 Economy3.1 Mining 3.2 Agriculture 3.3 Tourism4 Education 5 Places5.1 Beaches 5.2 Towns and villages 5.3 Caves 5.4 Other Places of Interest6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksHistory[edit] Saint Elizabeth originally included most of the south-west part of the island, but in 1703 Westmoreland was taken from it and in 1814 a part of Manchester. The resulting areas were named after the wife of Sir Thomas Modyford, the first English Governor of Jamaica. There are archeological traces of Taíno/Arawak existence in the parish, as well as of 17th-century colonial Spanish settlements
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Parish
A parish is a church territorial entity constituting a division within a diocese. A parish is under the pastoral care and clerical jurisdiction of a parish priest, who might be assisted by one or more curates, and who operates from a parish church. Historically, a parish often covered the same geographical area as a manor. Its association with the parish church remains paramount.[1] By extension the term parish refers not only to the territorial entity but to the people of its community or congregation as well as to church property within it
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River
A river is a natural flowing watercourse, usually freshwater, flowing towards an ocean, sea, lake or another river. In some cases a river flows into the ground and becomes dry at the end of its course without reaching another body of water. Small rivers can be referred to using names such as stream, creek, brook, rivulet, and rill. There are no official definitions for the generic term river as applied to geographic features,[1] although in some countries or communities a stream is defined by its size. Many names for small rivers are specific to geographic location; examples are "run" in some parts of the United States, "burn" in Scotland and northeast England, and "beck" in northern England. Sometimes a river is defined as being larger than a creek,[2] but not always: the language is vague.[3] Rivers are part of the hydrological cycle
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Confluence
In geography, a confluence (also: conflux) occurs where two or more flowing bodies of water join together to form a single channel.[1] A confluence can occur in several configurations: at the point where a tributary joins a larger river (main stem); or where two streams meet to become the source of a river of a new name (such as the confluence of the Monongahela and Allegheny rivers at Pittsburgh, forming the Ohio); or where two separated channels of a river (forming a river island) rejoin at the downstream end.Contents1 Scientific study of confluences1.1 Confluence
Confluence
Flow Zones (River)2 Confluences and humankind 3 Notable confluences3.1 Africa 3.2 Asia 3.3 Australia 3.4 Europe 3.5 North America 3.6 South America4 Confluences not of two rivers 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksScientific study of confluences[edit] Confluences are studied in a variety of sciences
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