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Ojibwe People
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, or Chippewa are an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
group of Indigenous Peoples in North America, known among many Indigenous peoples as Turtle Island. They live in Canada
Canada
and the United States and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw
Choctaw
and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people. The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, a branch of the Algonquian language family
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Chippewa (other)
Chippewa is an alternate spelling of the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
tribe of North America. Chippewa may also refer to:Contents1 Languages 2 Places2.1 United States 2.2 Canada3 Schools 4 Other uses 5 See alsoLanguages[edit]another name for the Ojibwe
Ojibwe

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British Columbia
British Columbia
British Columbia
(BC; French: Colombie-Britannique) is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 4.8 million as of 2017, it is Canada's third-most populous province. The first British settlement in the area was Fort Victoria, established in 1843, which gave rise to the City of Victoria, at first the capital of the separate Colony of Vancouver
Vancouver
Island. Subsequently, on the mainland, the Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
Colony of British Columbia (1858–1866)
was founded by Richard Clement Moody[5] and the Royal Engineers, Columbia Detachment, in response to the Fraser Canyon
Fraser Canyon
Gold Rush
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Native Americans In The United States
American Indian and Alaska
Alaska
Native (2010 Census Bureau)[1] One race: 2,932,248 are registered In combination with one or more of the other races listed: 2,288,331 Total: 5,220,579 ~ 1.6% of the total U.S
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Navajo Nation
The Navajo Nation (Naabeehó Bináhásdzo) is a Native American territory covering about 17,544,500 acres (71,000 km2; 27,413 sq mi), occupying portions of northeastern Arizona, southeastern Utah, and northwestern New Mexico
New Mexico
in the United States. This is the largest land area retained by a Native American tribe, with a population of roughly 350,000 as of 2016. The original territory has been expanded several times since the 1800s. In 2016, under the Tribal Nations Buy-Back Program, some 149,524 acres (605.10 km2; 233.63 sq mi) of land were returned by the Department of Interior to the Navajo Nation for tribal communal use
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Cherokee
316,049 enrolled tribal members (Eastern Band: 13,000+, Cherokee
Cherokee
Nation: 288,749, United Keetoowah Band: 14,300)[1] 819,105 claimed Cherokee
Cherokee
ancestry in the 2010 Census[2]Regions with significant populations United States North Carolina
North Carolina
16,158 (0.2%)[3][3]   Oklahoma
Oklahoma
102,580 (2.7%)[3]LanguagesEnglish, CherokeeReligionChristianity, Kituhwa, Four Mothers Society,[4] Native American Church[5]This article contains Cherokee
Cherokee
syllabic characters
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Choctaw
The Choctaw
Choctaw
(In the Choctaw
Choctaw
language, Chahta)[note 1] are a Native American people originally occupying what is now the Southeastern United States
United States
(modern-day Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, and Louisiana). Their Choctaw language
Choctaw language
belongs to the Muskogean
Muskogean
language family group. Hopewell and Mississippian cultures, who lived throughout the east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River valley and its tributaries. About 1,700 years ago, the Hopewell people built Nanih Waiya, a great earthwork mound located in what is central present-day Mississippi. It is still considered sacred by the Choctaw. The early Spanish explorers of the mid-16th century in the Southeast encountered Mississippian-culture villages and chiefs.[2] The anthropologist John R
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Sioux
The Sioux
Sioux
/suː/ also known as Lakota, are groups of Native American tribes and First Nations
First Nations
peoples in North America. The term can refer to any ethnic group within the Great Sioux Nation
Great Sioux Nation
or to any of the nation's many language dialects. The Sioux
Sioux
comprise three major divisions based on language divisions: the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota. The Santee Dakota (Isáŋyathi; "Knife") reside in the extreme east of the Dakotas, Minnesota
Minnesota
and northern Iowa. The Yankton and Yanktonai Dakota (Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋ and Iháŋktȟuŋwaŋna; "Village-at-the-end" and "Little village-at-the-end"), collectively also referred to by the endonym Wičhíyena, reside in the Minnesota River area
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Algonquian Languages
The Algonquian languages
Algonquian languages
(/ælˈɡɒŋkiən/ or /ælˈɡɒŋkwiən/;[2] also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family. The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language
Ojibwe language
(Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family. The term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet
Maliseet
word elakómkwik (pronounced [ɛlæˈɡomoɡwik]), "they are our relatives/allies".[3][4] A number of Algonquian languages, like many other Native American languages, are now extinct. Speakers of Algonquian languages
Algonquian languages
stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains
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Council Of Three Fires
The Council of Three Fires (in Anishinaabe: Niswi-mishkodewin) are also known as the People of the Three Fires; the Three Fires Confederacy; or the United Nations of Chippewa, Ottawa, and Potawatomi Indians
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Algonquin People
The Algonquins are indigenous inhabitants of North America
North America
who speak the Algonquin language, a divergent dialect of the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, which is part of the Algonquian language family.[1] Culturally and linguistically, they are closely related to the Odawa
Odawa
and Ojibwe, with whom they form the larger Anicinàpe (Anishinaabe) grouping
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Nipissing First Nation
The Nipissing First Nation
Nipissing First Nation
consists of historic First Nation band governments of Ojibwe
Ojibwe
and Algonquin descent who, following succeeding cultures of ancestors, have lived in the area of Lake Nipissing
Lake Nipissing
in the Canadian province
Canadian province
of Ontario
Ontario
for about 9,400 years. They are referred to by many names in European historical records, since the colonists often adopted names given to them by other nations. The Nipissing are generally considered part of the Anishinaabe peoples, a grouping of people speaking Algonquin languages, which includes the Odawa, Ojibwe
Ojibwe
and Algonquins
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Birch Bark
Birch
Birch
bark or birchbark is the bark of several Eurasian and North American birch trees of the genus Betula. The strong and water-resistant cardboard-like bark can be easily cut, bent, and sewn, which has made it a valuable building, crafting, and writing material, since pre-historic times. Even today, birch bark remains a popular type of wood for various handicrafts and arts. Birch
Birch
bark also contains substances of medicinal and chemical interest. Some of those products (such as betulin) also have fungicidal properties that help preserve bark artifacts, as well as food preserved in bark containers.A Russian birch bark letter (14th century)Contents1 Collection and storage 2 Working 3 Uses 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksCollection and storage[edit] Removing birch bark from live trees is harmful to tree health and should be avoided
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First Nations
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eIn Canada, the First Nations
First Nations
(French: Premières Nations) are the predominant indigenous peoples in Canada
Canada
south of the Arctic
Arctic
Circle. Those in the Arctic
Arctic
area are distinct and known as Inuit
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Canoe
A canoe is a lightweight narrow vessel, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle.[1] In International Canoe Federation
International Canoe Federation
nomenclature used in some European countries such as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
the term canoe refers to kayaks,[2] while canoes are called Canadian canoes. Canoes are professionally used for transport of people and materials all over the world. Besides canoes are widely used for pleasure racing, whitewater canoeing, touring and camping, freestyle, and general recreation. The intended use of the canoe dictates its hull shape and length and construction material. Historically, canoes were dugouts or made of bark on a wood frame,[3] but construction materials evolved to canvas on a wood frame, then to aluminum
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Birch Bark Scrolls
WikiProjectIndigenous North AmericansFirst NationsCommons WiktionaryInuitCommons WiktionaryMétisCommons Wiktionaryv t eExample of a Birch bark scroll pieceWiigwaasabak (Ojibwe language, plural: wiigwaasabakoon) are birch bark scrolls, on which the Ojibwa (Anishinaabe) people of North America wrote complex geometrical patterns and shapes. When used specifically for Midewiwin ceremonial use, these scrolls are called mide-wiigwaas. These enabled the memorization of complex ideas, and passing along history and stories to succeeding generations. Several such scrolls are in museums, including one on display at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, DC.[citation needed] In addition to birchbark, copper and slate may have also been used, along with hides, pottery, and other artifacts. Some archaeologists are presently trying to determine the exact origins, dates, and locations of their use
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