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Oggu Katha
Oggu Katha or Oggukatha is a traditional folklore singing, praising and narrating the stories of Hindu gods Mallana, Beerappa and Yellamma.[1] It originated among the Yadav
Yadav
(Golla) and Kuruma communities, who devoted themselves to the singing of ballads in praise of Lord Shiva
Shiva
(also called Mallikarjuna).[2] These tradition-loving and ritual-performing community moves from place to place, narrating the stories of their caste gods. Oggus are the traditional priests of the Yadavas and perform the marriage of Mallanna with Bhramaramba.Contents1 Etymology 2 The group 3 The performance 4 Dress 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The story narrated about Lord Mallanna or Mallikarjuna Swamy
Mallikarjuna Swamy
(son of Lord Shiva) using the instrument "Jaggu"(damarukam) is known as Oggu Katha
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Mallikarjuna Swamy
Shiva (/ˈʃiːvə, ˈʃɪ-/; Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the Supreme Being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva is the "destroyer of evil and the transformer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu trinity that includes Brahma and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism tradition, Shiva is the Supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[13][14][15] In the goddess tradition of Hinduism called Shaktism, the goddess is described as supreme, yet Shiva is revered along with Vishnu and Brahma
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Beerappa
Bheerappa is a God of Kuruma community. The Bhasagi tradition-loving and ritual-performing community moves from place to place, narrating the stories of their caste gods.[1] Oggus are the traditional priests of the or Kuruba's or Kuruma’s and perform the marriage of Beerappa (Veerabadra swamy) with Kamaraathi.[2] Temple[edit] One of the beerappa temple was located at Gurramguda village, Hyderabad its nearer to BN Reddy nagar Vanastalipuram. There is another temple in Uppal, Hyderabad.[3] Beerappa Jatara[edit] Kuruma people celebrate Beerappa jatara with very traditional manner, these peoples will celebrate beerappa jatara for every 5-10 years. Now jatara held on 20/5/2016 to 26/5/2016. Every kuruma community peoples celebrate this festival like marriage in their home
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Yellamma
Reṇukā/Renuga/Renu is a Hindu goddess worshipped predominantly in the Indian state of [[Maharashtra" means "Atom/Mother of Universe"[1] She is also worshipped in the South Indian states of Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Karanataka, and Tamil Nadu.[2] Renuka's temple at Mahur in Maharashtra is considered one of the shakti peethas. Renuka is also called as "Renu" which means "Atom/Mother of Universe".she got married with jamadagni muni, (an avatar of lord shiva) her worship also popularly celebrated in telangana as "yellamma jatara" Hence "Renu" which means "Atom/Mother of Universe/Wife of lord Shiva"[3]Contents1 Different names 2 Origin story2.1 Early life 2.2 Later life 2.3 Punishment and resurrection 2.4 Renuka vs. Yellamma3 Temples and related places 4 In Sri Lanka 5 Further reading 6 ReferencesDifferent names[edit] Renuka/Renu or Yellamma or Ekvira or Ellai amman or Ellai amma (Marathi:श्री
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Ballad
A ballad /ˈbæləd/ is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music. Ballads derive from the medieval French chanson balladée or ballade, which were originally "danced songs''. Ballads were particularly characteristic of the popular poetry and song of the British Isles from the later medieval period until the 19th century. They were widely used across Europe, and later in Australia, North Africa, North America
North America
and South America. Ballads are often 13 lines with an ABABBCBC form, consisting of couplets (two lines) of rhymed verse, each of 14 syllables. Another common form is ABAB or ABCB repeated, in alternating 8 and 6 syllable lines. Many ballads were written and sold as single sheet broadsides. The form was often used by poets and composers from the 18th century onwards to produce lyrical ballads
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Shiva
Shiva
Shiva
(/ˈʃiːvə, ˈʃɪ-/; Sanskrit: शिव, IAST: Śiva, lit. the auspicious one) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism. He is the Supreme Being within Shaivism, one of the major traditions within contemporary Hinduism.[10][11] Shiva
Shiva
is the "destroyer of evil and the transformer" within the Trimurti, the Hindu
Hindu
trinity that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Vishnu.[1][12] In Shaivism
Shaivism
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
is the Supreme being who creates, protects and transforms the universe.[13][14][15] In the goddess tradition of Hinduism
Hinduism
called Shaktism, the goddess is described as supreme, yet Shiva
Shiva
is revered along with Vishnu
Vishnu
and Brahma
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Yadav
Yadav
Yadav
refers to a grouping of traditionally mainly non-elite,[1][2][3][4] peasant-pastoral communities or castes in India and Nepal
Nepal
that since the 19th and 20th centuries[5][6] has claimed descent from the mythological King
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Martial
Marcus Valerius Martialis (known in English as Martial /ˈmɑːrʃəl/) (March, between 38 and 41 AD – between 102 and 104 AD) was a Roman poet from Hispania
Hispania
(modern Spain) best known for his twelve books of Epigrams, published in Rome
Rome
between AD 86 and 103, during the reigns of the emperors Domitian, Nerva
Nerva
and Trajan. In these short, witty poems he cheerfully satirises city life and the scandalous activities of his acquaintances, and romanticises his provincial upbringing
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Kirtan
Kirtana or Kirtan
Kirtan
(Sanskrit: कीर्तन; IAST: Kīrtana) is a Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word that means "narrating, reciting, telling, describing" of an idea or story.[1][2] It also refers to a genre of religious performance arts, connoting a musical form of narration or shared recitation, particularly of spiritual or religi
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Harikatha
Harikatha (Kannada: ಹರಿಕಥೆ : Harikathe; Telugu: హరికథ : Harikatha) , literally " Story of Hari", also known as Harikatha Kaalakshepam in Telugu (Spending time to listen to Hari's story (Katha)), is a form of Hindu religious discourse in which the storyteller explores a religious theme, usually the life of a saint or a story from an Indian epic. Harikatha is a composite art form composed of storytelling, poetry, music, drama, dance, and philosophy most prevalent in Andhrapradesh and Karnataka. Any Hindu religious theme may be the subject for the Harikatha. At its peak Harikatha was a popular medium of entertainment, which helped transmit cultural, educational and religious values to the masses. The main aim of Hari Katha is to imbue truth and righteousness in the minds of people and sow the seeds of devotion in them
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Burra Katha
Burra Katha, also spelled Burrakatha, is an oral storytelling technique in the Katha tradition, performed in villages of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana. The troupe consists of one main performer and two co-performers. It is a narrative entertainment that consists of prayers, solo drama, dance, songs, poems and jokes
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Pravachan
Pravachan, or Pravacana, is a Sanskrit term that refers to any exposition of a doctrine or treatise, or to the recitation of a scripture or text in Jainism and Hinduism traditions.[1] It particularly refers to the tradition of Pravacanakara (monks, scholars or saints) presenting their teachings or explanations of spiritual ideas before a gathering of householders or general public in the Indian traditions
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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Oggu Katha
Oggu Katha or Oggukatha is a traditional folklore singing, praising and narrating the stories of Hindu gods Mallana, Beerappa and Yellamma.[1] It originated among the Yadav
Yadav
(Golla) and Kuruma communities, who devoted themselves to the singing of ballads in praise of Lord Shiva
Shiva
(also called Mallikarjuna).[2] These tradition-loving and ritual-performing community moves from place to place, narrating the stories of their caste gods. Oggus are the traditional priests of the Yadavas and perform the marriage of Mallanna with Bhramaramba.Contents1 Etymology 2 The group 3 The performance 4 Dress 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The story narrated about Lord Mallanna or Mallikarjuna Swamy
Mallikarjuna Swamy
(son of Lord Shiva) using the instrument "Jaggu"(damarukam) is known as Oggu Katha
[...More...]

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