HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Nabaztag
Nabaztag
Nabaztag
(Armenian for "hare", նապաստակ (napastak)) is a Wi-Fi enabled ambient electronic device in the shape of a rabbit, invented by Rafi Haladjian
Rafi Haladjian
and Olivier Mével, and manufactured by the company Violet.[1] Nabaztag
Nabaztag
was designed to be a "smart object" comparable to those manufactured by Ambient Devices; it can connect to the Internet (to download weather forecasts, read its owner's email, etc.). It is also customizable and programmable to an extent. Sylvain Huet[2] developed most of the embedded code of all Violet objects. Sebastien Bourdeauducq developed the Wi-Fi
Wi-Fi
driver.[3] Antoine Schmitt[4] has been their behavior designer and Jean-Jacques Birgé their sound designer (together they have also composed Nabaz'mob, an opera for 100 Nabaztag[5])
[...More...]

"Nabaztag" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Portable Media Player
A portable media player (PMP) or digital audio player (DAP) is a portable consumer electronics device capable of storing and playing digital media such as audio, images, and video files.[1][2] The data is typically stored on a CD, DVD, flash memory, microdrive, or hard drive. Most portable media players are equipped with a 3.5 mm headphone jack, which users can plug headphones into, or connect to a boombox or hifi system
[...More...]

"Portable Media Player" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

TCP/IP
The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite is the conceptual model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet
Internet
and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP because the foundational protocols in the suite are the Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) and the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). It is occasionally known as the Department of Defense (DoD) model, because the development of the networking method was funded by the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
through DARPA. The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite provides end-to-end data communication specifying how data should be packetized, addressed, transmitted, routed, and received
[...More...]

"TCP/IP" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Podcasts
A podcast, or generically netcast, is an episodic series of digital audio or video files which a user can download and listen to. It is often available for subscription, so that new episodes are automatically downloaded via web syndication to the user's own local computer, mobile application, or portable media player.[1] It is distinct from Internet
Internet
radio, which involves streaming rather than downloading. The word was originally suggested by Ben Hammersley
Ben Hammersley
as a portmanteau of "iPod" (a brand of media player) and "broadcast".[2] The files distributed are in audio format, but may sometimes include other file formats such as PDF or EPUB. Videos which are shared following a podcast model are called video podcasts or vodcasts. The generator of a podcast maintains a central list of the files on a server as a web feed that can be accessed through the Internet
[...More...]

"Podcasts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dashboard (Mac OS)
Dashboard is an application for Apple Inc.'s macOS operating systems, used as a secondary desktop for hosting mini-applications known as widgets. These are intended to be simple applications that do not take time to launch. Dashboard applications supplied with macOS include a stock ticker, weather report, calculator and notepad; users can create or download their own. Before Mac OS X
Mac OS X
10.7 Lion, when Dashboard is activated, the user's desktop is dimmed and widgets appear in the foreground. Like application windows, they can be moved around, rearranged, deleted, and recreated (so that more than one of the same Widget is open at the same time, possibly with different settings)
[...More...]

"Dashboard (Mac OS)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Extensible Messaging And Presence Protocol
Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is a communications protocol for message-oriented middleware based on XML (Extensible Markup Language).[1] It enables the near-real-time exchange of structured yet extensible data between any two or more network entities.[2] Originally named Jabber,[3] the protocol was developed by the Jabber open-source community in 1999 for near real-time instant messaging (IM), presence information, and contact list maintenance. Designed to be extensible, the protocol has been used also for publish-subscribe systems, signalling for VoIP, video, file transfer, gaming, the Internet of Things (IoT) applications such as the smart grid, and social networking services. Unlike most instant messaging protocols, XMPP is defined in an open standard and uses an open systems approach of development and application, by which anyone may implement an XMPP service and interoperate with other organizations' implementations
[...More...]

"Extensible Messaging And Presence Protocol" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PIC Microcontroller
PIC (usually pronounced as "pick") is a family of microcontrollers made by Microchip Technology, derived from the PIC1650[1][2][3] originally developed by General Instrument's Microelectronics Division. The name PIC initially referred to Peripheral Interface Controller,[4] then it was corrected as Programmable Intelligent Computer.[5] The first parts of the family were available in 1976; by 2013 the company had shipped more than twelve billion individual parts, used in a wide variety of embedded systems. Early models of PIC had read-only memory (ROM) or field-programmable EPROM
EPROM
for program storage, some with provision for erasing memory. All current models use flash memory for program storage, and newer models allow the PIC to reprogram itself. Program memory and data memory are separated. Data memory is 8-bit, 16-bit, and, in latest models, 32-bit wide. Program instructions vary in bit-count by family of PIC, and may be 12, 14, 16, or 24 bits long
[...More...]

"PIC Microcontroller" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BenQ
BenQ
BenQ
Corporation (/ˌbɛn ˈkjuː/; Chinese: 明基電通股份有限公司) is a Taiwanese multi-national company that sells and markets technology products, consumer electronics, computing and communications devices[2] under the "BenQ" brand name, which stands for the company slogan Bringing Enjoyment N Quality to life. Its principal products include TFT LCD
TFT LCD
monitors, digital projectors, digital cameras, and mobile computing devices. BenQ's head office is located in Taipei, and the company operates five branch offices in the Asia-Pacific, Europe, China, Latin America and North America, and employs over 1,300 individuals
[...More...]

"BenQ" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PC Card
In computing, PC Card
PC Card
is a configuration for computer parallel communication peripheral interface, designed for laptop computers. Originally introduced as PCMCIA, the PC Card
PC Card
standard as well as its successors like CardBus were defined and developed by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA). It was originally designed as a standard for memory-expansion cards for computer storage
[...More...]

"PC Card" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sound Generator
A sound generator is a vibrating object which produces a sound. There are two main kinds of sound generators (thus, two main kinds of musical instruments). A full cycle of a sound wave will be described in each example which consists of initial normal conditions (no fluctuations in atmospheric pressure), an increase of air pressure, a subsequent decrease in air pressure which brings it back to normal, a decrease in air pressure (less pressure than initial conditions), and lastly, an increase which brings atmospheric pressure back to normal again. Therefore, the final conditions are the same as the initial, at-rest conditions. The first kind is simple and is called the vibrating or oscillating piston.[1] Examples of this type of sound generator include the soundboard of a piano, the surfaces of drums and cymbals, the diaphragm of loudspeakers, etc
[...More...]

"Sound Generator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ADPCM
Adaptive differential pulse-code modulation (ADPCM) is a variant of differential pulse-code modulation (DPCM) that varies the size of the quantization step, to allow further reduction of the required data bandwidth for a given signal-to-noise ratio. Typically, the adaptation to signal statistics in ADPCM consists simply of an adaptive scale factor before quantizing the difference in the DPCM encoder.[1] ADPCM was developed in the early 1970s at Bell Labs for voice coding, by P. Cummiskey, N. S. Jayant and James L. Flanagan.[2]Contents1 In telephony 2 Split-band or subband ADPCM 3 Software 4 ReferencesIn telephony[edit] In telephony, a standard audio signal for a single phone call is encoded as 8000 analog samples per second, of 8 bits each, giving a 64 kbit/s digital signal known as DS0. The default signal compression encoding on a DS0 is either μ-law (mu-law) PCM (North America and Japan) or A-law PCM (Europe and most of the rest of the world)
[...More...]

"ADPCM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

LED
A light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source. It is a p–n junction diode that emits light when activated.[5] When a suitable current is applied to the leads,[6][7] electrons are able to recombine with electron holes within the device, releasing energy in the form of photons. This effect is called electroluminescence, and the color of the light (corresponding to the energy of the photon) is determined by the energy band gap of the semiconductor. LEDs
LEDs
are typically small (less than 1 mm2) and integrated optical components may be used to shape the radiation pattern.[8] Appearing as practical electronic components in 1962, the earliest LEDs
LEDs
emitted low-intensity infrared light.[9] Infrared
Infrared
LEDs
LEDs
are still frequently used as transmitting elements in remote-control circuits, such as those in remote controls for a wide variety of consumer electronics
[...More...]

"LED" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

RAM
Random-access memory
Random-access memory
(RAM /ræm/) is a form of computer data storage that stores data and machine code currently being used. A random-access memory device allows data items to be read or written in almost the same amount of time irrespective of the physical location of data inside the memory. In contrast, with other direct-access data storage media such as hard disks, CD-RWs, DVD-RWs and the older magnetic tapes and drum memory, the time required to read and write data items varies significantly depending on their physical locations on the recording medium, due to mechanical limitations such as media rotation speeds and arm movement. RAM contains multiplexing and demultiplexing circuitry, to connect the data lines to the addressed storage for reading or writing the entry. Usually more than one bit of storage is accessed by the same address, and RAM devices often have multiple data lines and are said to be "8-bit" or "16-bit", etc
[...More...]

"RAM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virtual Machine
In computing, a virtual machine (VM) is an emulation of a computer system. Virtual machines are based on computer architectures and provide functionality of a physical computer. Their implementations may involve specialized hardware, software, or a combination. There are different kinds of virtual machines, each with different functions:System virtual machines (also termed full virtualization VMs) provide a substitute for a real machine. They provide functionality needed to execute entire operating systems
[...More...]

"Virtual Machine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flickr
Flickr
Flickr
(pronounced "flicker") is an image- and video-hosting website and web services suite that was created by Ludicorp
Ludicorp
in 2004 and acquired by Yahoo
[...More...]

"Flickr" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Assembly Language
An assembly (or assembler) language,[1] often abbreviated asm, is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device, in which there is a very strong (but often not one-to-one) correspondence between the language and the architecture's machine code instructions. Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture. In contrast, most high-level programming languages are generally portable across multiple architectures but require interpreting or compiling. Assembly language
Assembly language
may also be called symbolic machine code.[2] Assembly language
Assembly language
is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler. The conversion process is referred to as assembly, or assembling the source code
[...More...]

"Assembly Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.