HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Music Notation
Music
Music
notation or musical notation is any system used to visually represent aurally perceived music played with instruments or sung by the human voice through the use of written, printed, or otherwise-produced symbols. Types and methods of notation have varied between cultures and throughout history, and much information about ancient music notation is fragmentary
[...More...]

"Music Notation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Musical Isomorphism
In mathematics, the musical isomorphism (or canonical isomorphism) is an isomorphism between the tangent bundle T M displaystyle TM and the cotangent bundle T ∗ M displaystyle T^ * M of a pseudo-Riemannian manifold induced by its metric tensor. There are similar isomorphisms on symplectic manifolds
[...More...]

"Musical Isomorphism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scorewriter
A scorewriter, or music notation program is software used with a computer for creating, editing and printing sheet music. A scorewriter is to music notation what a word processor is to text, in that they both allow fast corrections (undo), flexible editing, easy sharing of electronic documents (via the Internet
Internet
or compact storage media), and clean, uniform layout. In addition, most scorewriters, especially those from the 2000s, are able to record notes played on a MIDI keyboard (or other instrument), and play music back via MIDI
MIDI
or virtual instruments
[...More...]

"Scorewriter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Baroque Music
Baroque
Baroque
music (US: /bəˈroʊk/ or UK: /bəˈrɒk/) is a style of Western art music
Western art music
composed from approximately 1600 to 1750.[1] This era followed the Renaissance music
Renaissance music
era, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. Baroque
Baroque
music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, and is now widely studied, performed, and listened to
[...More...]

"Baroque Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Figured Bass
Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of musical notation in which numerals and symbols (often accidentals) indicate intervals, chords, and non-chord tones that a musician playing piano, harpsichord, organ, lute (or other instruments capable of playing chords) play in relation to the bass note that these numbers and symbols appear above or below. Figured bass
Figured bass
is closely associated with basso continuo, a historically improvised accompaniment used in almost all genres of music in the Baroque period of
[...More...]

"Figured Bass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Throughbass
Figured bass, or thoroughbass, is a kind of musical notation in which numerals and symbols (often accidentals) indicate intervals, chords, and non-chord tones that a musician playing piano, harpsichord, organ, lute (or other instruments capable of playing chords) play in relation to the bass note that these numbers and symbols appear above or below. Figured bass is closely associated with basso continuo, a historically improvised accompaniment used in almost all genres of music in the Baroque period of Classical music (c.1600–1750), though rarely in modern music. Other systems for denoting or representing chords include[1] plain staff notation, used in classical music; Roman numerals, commonly used in harmonic analysis;[2] macro symbols, sometimes used in modern musicology; the Nashville number system; and various chord names and symbols used in jazz and popular music (e.g., C Major or simply C; D minor or Dm; G7, etc.).Contents1 Basso continuo 2 Figured bass notation
[...More...]
"Throughbass" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chord Progression
A chord progression or harmonic progression is a succession of musical chords, which are two or more notes, typically sounded simultaneously. Chord progressions are the foundation of harmony in Western musical tradition from the common practice era of Classical music
Classical music
to the 21st century. Chord progressions are the foundation of Western popular music styles (e.g., pop music, rock music) and traditional music (e.g., blues and jazz). In tonal music, chord progressions have the function of establishing or contradicting a tonality, the technical name for what is commonly understood as the "key" of a song or piece. Chord progressions are usually expressed by Roman numerals
Roman numerals
in Classical music
Classical music
music theory; for example, the common chord progression I vi/ii V7
[...More...]

"Chord Progression" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Songwriter
A songwriter is a professional who is paid to write lyrics for singers and melodies for songs, typically for a popular music genre such as rock or country music. A songwriter can also be called a composer, although the latter term tends to be used mainly for individuals from the classical music genre. The pressure from the music industry to produce popular hits means that songwriting is often an activity for which the tasks are distributed between a number of people.[1] For example, a songwriter who excels at writing lyrics might be paired with a songwriter with the task of creating original melodies
[...More...]

"Songwriter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Period (music)
The dates of the Classical period in Western music are generally accepted as being between about the year 1730 and the year 1820. However, the term classical music is often used in a colloquial sense as a synonym for Western art music which describes a variety of Western musical styles from the Middle Ages to the present, and especially from the seventeenth century to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period in most of the 18th century to the early 19th century, though overlapping with the Baroque and Romantic periods.[1] The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. Classical music
Classical music
has a lighter, clearer texture than Baroque music and is less complex. It is mainly homophonic, using a clear melody line over a subordinate chordal accompaniment,[2] but counterpoint was by no means forgotten, especially later in the period
[...More...]

"Classical Period (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romantic Music Era
Romantic music
Romantic music
is a period of Western classical music that began in the late 18th or early 19th century. It is related to Romanticism, the European artistic and literary movement that arose in the second half of the 18th century, and Romantic music
Romantic music
in particular dominated the Romantic movement in Germany.The title character from a 19th-century performance of Wagner's opera SiegfriedIn the Romantic period, music became more expressive and emotional, expanding to encompass literary, artistic, and philosophical themes. Famous early Romantic composers include Beethoven (whose works span both this period and the preceding Classical period), Schubert, Schumann, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Bellini, and Berlioz
[...More...]

"Romantic Music Era" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Music Technology (mechanical)
Mechanical music technology is the use of any device, mechanism, machine or tool by a musician or composer to make or perform music; to compose, notate, play back or record songs or pieces; or to analyze or edit music. The earliest known applications of technology to music was prehistoric peoples' use of a tool to hand-drill holes in bones to make simple flutes. Ancient Egyptians developed stringed instruments, such as harps, lyres and lutes, which required making thin strings and some type of peg system for adjusting the pitch of the strings. Ancient Egyptians also used wind instruments such as double clarinets and percussion instruments such as cymbals. In Ancient Greece, instruments included the double-reed aulos and the lyre. Numerous instruments are referred to in the Bible, including the horn, pipe, lyre, harp, and bagpipe. During Biblical times, the cornet, flute, horn, organ, pipe, and trumpet were also used
[...More...]

"Music Technology (mechanical)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Contemporary Classical Music
Contemporary classical music can be understood as belonging to the period that started in the mid-1970s to early 1990s, which includes modernist, postmodern, neoromantic, and pluralist music.[1] However, the term may also be employed in a broader sense to refer to all post-1945 musical forms.[2]Contents1 Categorization 2 History2.1 Background 2.2 1945–753 Movements3.1 Modernism 3.2 Electronic music3.2.1 Computer
Computer
music3.3
[...More...]

"Contemporary Classical Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Graphical Notation (music)
Graphic notation (or graphic score) is the representation of music through the use of visual symbols outside the realm of traditional music notation. Graphic notation evolved in the 1950s, and it is often used in combination with traditional music notation.[1] Composers often rely on graphic notation in experimental music, where standard musical notation can be ineffective.Contents1 History 2 Examples of graphic notation 3 Other composers who have used graphic notation 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] A common aspect of graphic notation is the use of symbols to convey information to the performer about the way the piece is to be performed
[...More...]

"Graphical Notation (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Popular Music
Popular music
Popular music
is music with wide appeal[1][2][3] that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training.[1] It stands in contrast to both art music[4][5][6] and traditional or "folk" music. Art music
Art music
was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings
[...More...]

"Popular Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Plainchant
Plainsong (also plainchant; Latin: cantus planus) is a body of chants used in the liturgies of the Western Church. Though the Catholic Church (both its Eastern and Western halves) and the Eastern Orthodox churches did not split until long after the origin of plainsong, Byzantine chants are generally not classified as plainsong. Plainsong is monophonic, consisting of a single, unaccompanied melodic line. Its rhythm is generally freer than the metered rhythm of later Western music.Contents1 History 2 Chant types 3 Modes 4 Example 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]A sample of the Kýrie Eléison (Orbis Factor) from the Liber Usualis, in neume notation. Listen to it interpreted.Plainsong developed during the earliest centuries of Christianity, influenced possibly by the music of the Jewish synagogue and certainly by the Greek modal system
[...More...]

"Plainchant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Traditional Music
Folk music
Folk music
includes both traditional music and the genre that evolved from it during the 20th century folk revival. The term originated in the 19th century, but is often applied to music older than that. Some types of folk music are also called world music. Traditional folk music has been defined in several ways: as music transmitted orally, music with unknown composers, or music performed by custom over a long period of time. It has been contrasted with commercial and classical styles. Starting in the mid-20th century, a new form of popular folk music evolved from traditional folk music. This process and period is called the (second) folk revival and reached a zenith in the 1960s
[...More...]

"Traditional Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.