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Moses
Moses
Moses
(/ˈmoʊzɪz, -zɪs/)[2][Note 1] was a prophet in the Abrahamic religions. According to the Hebrew Bible, he was adopted by an Egyptian princess, and later in life became the leader of the Israelites
Israelites
and lawgiver, to whom the authorship of the Torah, or acquisition of the Torah
Torah
from Heaven is traditionally attributed
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Hebrew Bible
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t ePage from an 11th-century Aramaic Targum
Targum
manuscript of the Hebrew Bible.Hebrew Bible
Bible
or Hebrew Scriptures (Latin: Biblia Hebraica) is the term used by biblical scholars to refer to the Tanakh
Tanakh
(Hebrew: תנ"ך‎; Latin: Thanach), the canonical collection of Jewish texts. They are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others). The Hebrew Bible
Bible
is the common textual source of several canonical editions of the Christian
Christian
Old Testament
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Literal Translation
Literal translation, direct translation, or word-for-word translation is the rendering of text from one language to another one word at a time (Latin: "verbum pro verbo") with or without conveying the sense of the original whole. In translation studies, "literal translation" denotes technical translation of scientific, technical, technological or legal texts.[1] In translation theory, another term for "literal translation" is "metaphrase"; and for phrasal ("sense") translation — "paraphrase." When considered a bad practice of conveying word by word (lexeme to lexeme, or morpheme to lexeme) translation of non-technical type literal translations has the meaning of mistranslating idioms,[2] for example, or in the context of translating an analytic language to a synthetic language, it renders even the grammar unintelligible. The concept of literal translation may be viewed as an oxymoron (contradiction in terms), given that literal denotes something existing without interpretation, where
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Lower Egypt
Lower Egypt
Egypt
(Arabic: مصر السفلى‎ Miṣr as-Suflā) is the northernmost region of Egypt: the fertile Nile
Nile
Delta, between Upper Egypt
Egypt
and the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
— from El Aiyat, south of modern-day Cairo, and Dahshur.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 List of kings of the Predynastic Period of Lower Egypt 4 List of nomes 5 See also 6 ReferencesGeography[edit] In ancient times, Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
(N.H. 5.11) said that upon reaching the delta the Nile
Nile
split into seven branches (from east to west): the Pelusiac, the Tanitic, the Mendesian, the Phatnitic, the Sebennytic, the Bolbitine, and the Canopic
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New Kingdom Of Egypt
The New Kingdom of Egypt, also referred to as the Egyptian Empire, is the period in ancient Egyptian history between the 16th century BC and the 11th century BC, covering the 18th, 19th, and 20th Dynasties of Egypt. Radiocarbon dating places the exact beginning of the New Kingdom between 1570 BC and 1544 BC.[1] The New Kingdom followed the Second Intermediate Period and was succeeded by the Third Intermediate Period. It was Egypt's most prosperous time and marked the peak of its power.[2] The later part of this period, under the 19th and 20th Dynasties (1292–1069 BC), is also known as the Ramesside period
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Karelia
Coordinates: 63°N 32°E / 63°N 32°E / 63; 32 Flags
Flags
of KareliaThe two flags of Karelia, the nationalist flag (left, with cross) and the official flag of the Russian Republic of Karelia
Republic of Karelia
(right, with bars)Coat of arms of KareliaThe two coats of arms of Karelia, the Finnish one (left, with crown) and the Russian one (right, with bear) Karelia
Karelia
(Karelian, Finnish and Estonian: Karjala; Russian: Карелия, Kareliya; Swedish: Karelen), the land of the Karelian peoples, is an area in Northern Europe
Northern Europe
of historical significance for Finland, Russia, and Sweden
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Kizhi
Coordinates: 62°04′00″N 35°14′17″E / 62.06667°N 35.23806°E / 62.06667; 35.23806KizhiKizhiGeographyLocation RussiaArea 5 km2 (1.9 sq mi)Length 6 km (3.7 mi)Width 1 km (0.6 mi)AdministrationRussia Kizhi
Kizhi
(Russian: Ки́жи, IPA: [ˈkʲiʐɨ], Karelian: Kiži) is an island near the geometrical center of the Lake Onega
Lake Onega
in the Republic of Karelia
Republic of Karelia
(Medvezhyegorsky District), Russia. It is elongated from north to south and is about 6 km long, 1 km wide and is about 68 km away from the capital of Karelia, Petrozavodsk. Settlements and churches on the island were known from at least the 15th century
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Iconostasis
In Eastern Christianity
Christianity
an iconostasis (plural: iconostases) is a wall of icons and religious paintings, separating the nave from the sanctuary in a church. Iconostasis
Iconostasis
also refers to a portable icon stand that can be placed anywhere within a church. The iconostasis evolved from the Byzantine templon, a process complete by the fifteenth century. A direct comparison for the function of the main iconostasis can be made to the layout of the great Temple in Jerusalem. That Temple was designed with three parts. The holiest and inner-most portion was that where the Ark of the Covenant was kept. This portion, the Holy of Holies, was separated from the second larger part of the building's interior by a curtain, the "veil of the temple". Only the High Priest was allowed to enter the Holy of Holies. The third part was the entrance court
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Red Sea
The Red Sea
Red Sea
(also the Erythraean Sea) is a seawater inlet of the Indian Ocean, lying between Africa
Africa
and Asia. The connection to the ocean is in the south through the Bab el Mandeb
Bab el Mandeb
strait and the Gulf of Aden. To the north lie the Sinai Peninsula, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the Gulf of Suez
Gulf of Suez
(leading to the Suez
Suez
Canal). The Red Sea
Red Sea
is a Global 200 ecoregion. The sea is underlain by the Red Sea Rift which is part of the Great Rift Valley. The Red Sea
Red Sea
has a surface area of roughly 438,000 km2 (169,100 mi2),[1][2] is about 2250 km (1398 mi) long and, at its widest point, 355 km (220.6 mi) wide
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Cushi
The word Cushi
Cushi
or Kushi (Hebrew: כּוּשִׁי‎ kūšî) is a term generally used in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
to refer to a dark-skinned person usually of African descent. Initially the word was used by Hebrew-speaking Jews
Jews
to refer to individuals of Ethiopian origin, derived from the biblical land of Cush.[1] Etymology[edit] Cush or Kush (כּוּשׁ Kūš) is the name of an ancient ethnic group who came from the land of Cush, centered on the Upper Nile and Nubia (modern-day Sudan)
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Russian Orthodox
Coordinates: 55°42′40″N 37°37′45″E / 55.71111°N 37.62917°E / 55.71111; 37.62917Russian Orthodox Church ( Moscow
Moscow
Patriarchate)The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
Cathedral of Christ the Saviour
in Mosc
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Icon
An icon (from Greek εἰκών eikōn "image") is a religious work of art, most commonly a painting, from the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, and certain Eastern Catholic
Eastern Catholic
churches. The most common subjects include Christ, Mary, saints and/or angels. Though especially associated with "portrait" style images concentrating on one or two main figures, the term also covers most religious images in a variety of artistic media produced by Eastern Christianity, including narrative scenes. Icons may also be cast in metal, carved in stone, embroidered on cloth, painted on wood, done in mosaic or fresco work, printed on paper or metal, etc
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Hebrews
Hebrews
Hebrews
(Hebrew: עברים or עבריים, Tiberian ʿIḇrîm, ʿIḇriyyîm; Modern Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
ʿIvrim, ʿIvriyyim; ISO 259-3 ʕibrim, ʕibriyim) is a term appearing 34 times within 32 verses[1][2][3] of the Hebrew
Hebrew
Bible
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Child Abandonment
Child abandonment
Child abandonment
is the practice of relinquishing interests and claims over one's offspring in an extralegal way with the intent of never again resuming or reasserting guardianship over them.[1] Typically the phrase is used to describe the physical abandoning of a child, but it can also include severe cases of neglect and emotional abandonment, such as in the case of a parent who fails to offer financial and emotional support for their child over a long period of time.[1] An abandoned child is referred to as a foundling (as opposed to a runaway or an orphan).[1] Baby dumping refers to parents leaving a
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Moab
Moab
Moab
(/ˈmoʊæb/; Moabite: 𐤌𐤀𐤁‬ mʾb; Arabic: مؤاب‎ muʾāb; Hebrew: מוֹאָב‬, Modern Mō'av, Tiberian Mōʾôḇ; Ancient Greek: Μωάβ Mōáb; Assyrian Mu'aba, Ma'ba, Ma'ab; Egyptian Mu'ab) is the historical name for a mountainous tract of land in Jordan. The land lies alongside much of the eastern shore of the Dead Sea
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