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Moody Street Irregulars
Moody Street Irregulars
Moody Street Irregulars
(subtitled A Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
Newsletter) was an American publication dedicated to the history and the cultural influences of Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
and the Beat Generation. Edited and published by Joy Walsh, it featured articles, memoirs, reviews and poetry. Published from Clarence Center, New York, it had a run of 28 issues from Winter 1978 to 1992. Some issues were edited by Walsh with Michael Basinski and Ana Pine. The magazine's approach is indicated by the contents of issue number 9 (1981), a special Vanity of Duluoz
Vanity of Duluoz
issue including essays and articles by Gregory Stephenson, John Clellon Holmes, Carolyn Cassady, plus an interview with William S. Burroughs
William S

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Steve Fiorilla
Steve Fiorilla
Steve Fiorilla
(January 12, 1961 – July 29, 2009) was an American artist born in Paterson, New Jersey, who lived and worked in Buffalo, New York. Throughout his career, Fiorilla emphasized the grotesque and surreal in illustrations, sculpture and fine art. As a sculptor, he produced a variety of bizarre, malformed creatures. His film reviews appeared under the pseudonym Jacques Corédor.Contents1 Print 2 Film and television 3 Miscellaneous work 4 References 5 External linksPrint[edit] Fiorilla illustrated for books and magazines (Heavy Metal, Video Games and Computer Entertainment, High Times), T-shirts, small press journals (Eegah!, Magick Theatre, Moody Street Irregulars), catalog covers (Gregg Press), fanzines (Horror from the Crypt of Fear) and mini-comics (City Scenes)
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Pic (novel)
Pic is a novella by Jack Kerouac, first published in 1971. Pic is the story of a small child, Pictorial Review Jackson, from North Carolina. When his grandfather, with whom he lives, dies, his older brother appears and plucks him from the dysfunctional home of his aunt. They journey north to New York City, where Pic bears witness to the economic 'hard times' his brother is experiencing. After losing not one, but two jobs in one day, his brother sends his pregnant girlfriend to live with her sister in San Francisco, as the two boys try to hitch and bum their way across the country. It is written in a voice that is stereotypically black. It is out of print and currently available only as a single volume with either of Kerouac's novels Satori in Paris
Satori in Paris
and The Subterraneans. References[edit]1971. Pic, ISBN 0-7043-1122-4 1988
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Doctor Sax
Doctor Sax
Doctor Sax
(Doctor Sax: Faust Part Three) is a novel by Jack Kerouac published in 1959. Kerouac
Kerouac
wrote it in 1952 while living with William S. Burroughs in Mexico City.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Character Key 3 Doctor Sax
Doctor Sax
and the Great World Snake3.1 Voice acting 3.2 Score4 In other media 5 ReferencesPlot summary[edit] The novel begins with Jackie Duluoz, based on Kerouac
Kerouac
himself, relating a dream in which he finds himself in Lowell, Massachusetts, his childhood home town. Prompted by this dream, he recollects the story of his childhood of warm browns and sepia tones, along with his shrouded childhood fantasies, which have become inextricable from the memories. The fantasies pertain to a castle in Lowell atop a muted green hill that Jackie calls Snake Hill. Underneath the misty grey castle, the Great World Snake sleeps
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Maggie Cassidy
Maggie Cassidy
Maggie Cassidy
is a novel by the American writer Jack Kerouac, first published in 1959. It is a largely autobiographical work about Kerouac's early life in Lowell, Massachusetts, from 1938 to 1939, and chronicles his real-life relationship with his teenage sweetheart Mary Carney. It is unique for Kerouac
Kerouac
for its high school setting and teenage characters. He wrote the novel in 1953 but it was not published until 1959, after the success of On the Road
On the Road
(1957). The original manuscript published by Avon Books in 1959 was almost immediately pulled from the shelves due to objections over profanity in one particular passage
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Book Of Dreams (novel)
Book of Dreams is an experimental novel published by Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
in 1960, culled from the dream journal he kept from 1952 to 1960. In it Kerouac
Kerouac
tries to continue plot-lines with characters from his books as he sees them in his dreams. This book is stylistically wild, spontaneous, and flowing, like much of Kerouac's writing, and helps to give insight into the Beat Generation
Beat Generation
author's mind. References[edit]Kerouac, Jack (1960)
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Tristessa
Tristessa is a novella by Beat Generation
Beat Generation
writer Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
set in Mexico City. It is based on his relationship with a Mexican prostitute (the title character). The woman's real name was Esperanza ("hope" in Spanish); Kerouac
Kerouac
changed her name to Tristessa ("tristeza" means sadness in Spanish and Portuguese). This novel has been translated into Spanish by Jorge García-Robles, of Mexico City. Allen Ginsberg, in describing the book, wrote, "Tristessa's a narrative meditation studying a hen, a rooster, a dove, a cat, a dog, family meat, and a ravishing, ravished junkie lady". In "Tristessa", Kerouac
Kerouac
attempts to sketch for the reader a picture of quiet transcendence in hectic and sometimes dangerous circumstances
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Visions Of Cody
Visions of Cody
Visions of Cody
is an experimental novel by Jack Kerouac. It was written in 1951-1952, and though not published in its entirety until 1972, it had by then achieved an underground reputation. Since its first printing, Visions of Cody
Visions of Cody
has been published with an introduction by Beat poet Allen Ginsberg
Allen Ginsberg
titled "The Visions of the Great Rememberer."Contents1 Origins 2 Book structure 3 Character key 4 Themes and literary style 5 References 6 External linksOrigins[edit] Visions of Cody
Visions of Cody
is derived from experimental spontaneous prose inserts that Kerouac
Kerouac
added to the original manuscript of On the Road
On the Road
in 1951-52. Part of the novel is a fast-forward recapitulation of the events described in On the Road, which was also about Kerouac
Kerouac
and Cassady
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Lonesome Traveler
Lonesome Traveler
Lonesome Traveler
is a collection of short stories and sketches by American novelist and poet Jack Kerouac, published in 1960. It is a compilation of Kerouac's journal entries about traveling the United States, Mexico, Morocco, the United Kingdom and France, and covers similar issues to his novels, such as relationships, various jobs, and the nature of his life on the road. Some of the stories originally appeared as magazine articles.Contents1 Details 2 Stories included 3 Sources 4 ReferencesDetails[edit] The collection includes some of Kerouac's best[citation needed] writing in his spontaneous prose style
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Big Sur (novel)
Big Sur
Big Sur
is a 1962 novel by Jack Kerouac. It recounts the events surrounding Kerouac's (here known by the name of his fictional alter-ego Jack Duluoz) three brief sojourns to a cabin in Bixby Canyon, Big Sur, owned by Kerouac's friend and Beat poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti. The novel departs from Kerouac's previous fictionalized autobiographical series in that the character Duluoz is shown as a popular, published author. The Subterraneans
The Subterraneans
also mentions Kerouac's (Leo Percepied) status as an author, and in fact even mentions how some of the bohemians of New York are beginning to talk in slang derived from his writing. Kerouac's previous novels are restricted to depicting Kerouac's days as a bohemian traveller.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Character Key 3 Film adaptation 4 References 5 External linksSynopsis[edit] The novel depicts Duluoz's mental and physical deterioration
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Visions Of Gerard
Visions of Gerard
Visions of Gerard
is a 1963 novel by American Beat writer Jack Kerouac. It is the first volume in Kerouac's "Duluoz Legend". Unique among Kerouac's novels, Visions of Gerard
Visions of Gerard
focuses on the scenes and sensations of childhood as evidenced in the tragically short yet happy life of his older brother, Gerard. Kerouac
Kerouac
paints a picture of the boy as a saint, who loves all creatures and teaches this doctrine to four-year-old Jack. Set in Kerouac's hometown of Lowell, Massachusetts, it is a beautiful but unsettling exploration of the meaning and precariousness of existence.[1] Explanation of the novel's title[edit] Throughout the novel, Jack explores perspective and interpretations of the world—existence, reality, illusion—and through the death of his older brother Gerard Jack realizes the Truth that has been passed on throughout history
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Desolation Angels (novel)
Desolation Angels is a semi-autobiographical novel written by Beat Generation author Jack Kerouac, which makes up part of his Duluoz Legend. It was published in 1965, but was written years earlier, around the time On the Road
On the Road
was in the process of publication. According to the book's foreword, the opening section of the novel is taken almost directly from the journal he kept when he was a fire lookout on Desolation Peak in the North Cascade mountains of Washington state
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Satori In Paris
Satori in Paris
Paris
is a 1966 novella by American novelist and poet Jack Kerouac. It is a short, autobiographical tale of Kerouac's trip to Paris, then Brittany, to research his genealogy. Kerouac
Kerouac
relates his trip in a tumbledown fashion as a lonesome traveler. Little is said about the research that he does, and much more about his interactions with the French people he meets. Although Kerouac
Kerouac
was fluent in a form of Quebec French called Joual, Kerouac's French would not only have seemed heavily accented, but would also have contained hundreds of odd words that would mark him as a foreigner to the French. References[edit]1966. Satori in Paris, ISBN 0-394-17437-2 1982. Satori in Paris, Granada Publishing, ISBN 0-586-05545-2 1988. Satori in Paris
Paris
& Pic, ISBN 0-8021-3061-5 1991
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Orpheus Emerged
Orpheus Emerged is a novella written by Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
in 1945 when he was at Columbia University. The novella was discovered after his death and published in 2002. Orpheus Emerged chronicles the passions, conflicts, and dreams of a group of bohemians searching for truth while studying at a university. Kerouac
Kerouac
wrote the story shortly after meeting Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, Lucien Carr, and others in and around Columbia University who would form the core of the Beats. References[edit]Kerouac, Jack (1960). Tristessa
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The Subterraneans
The Subterraneans
The Subterraneans
is a 1958 novella by Beat Generation
Beat Generation
author Jack Kerouac. It is a semi-fictional account of his short romance with Alene Lee (1931-1991), an African-American woman, in Greenwich Village, New York. Kerouac
Kerouac
met Alene in the late summer of 1953 when she was typing up the manuscripts of William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, in Allen's Lower East Side apartment. [1] In the novella, Kerouac
Kerouac
moved the story to San Francisco
San Francisco
and renamed Alene Lee "Mardou Fox". She is described as a carefree spirit who frequents the jazz clubs and bars of the budding Beat scene of San Francisco.[2] Other well-known personalities and friends from the author's life also appear thinly disguised in the novel. The character Frank Carmody is based on William S
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Pull My Daisy (poem)
"Pull My Daisy" is a poem by Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac
Jack Kerouac
and Neal Cassady. It was written in the late 1940s in a similar way to the Surrealist
Surrealist
“exquisite corpse” game, with one person writing the first line, the other writing the second, and so on sequentially with each person only being shown the line before. It provided the title for the film Pull My Daisy, which was narrated by Kerouac, and featured Ginsberg and other writers, artists and actors of the Beat Generation. It was based on an event in the life of Cassady. The poem also featured in a jazz composition by David Amram, which appeared in the opening of the film. The film is available on the UbuWeb archive.[1] "Pull My Daisy" can be found published in various forms in Kerouac's Scattered Poems
Scattered Poems
and Ginsberg's Collected Poems. References[edit]^ "Alfred Leslie (b. 1927)". UbuWeb
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