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Misil
Mishil (hanja: 美室; c. 546/548 – c. 612) is a historical figure in the Korean dynasty of Silla. According to the Hwarang
Hwarang
Segi, an ancient historical record of the hwarang of Silla, Mishil was the daughter of Lord Mijinbu and Lady Myodo and sister of Queen Mother Sado, the consort of Jinheung of Silla. Her paternal grandmother was Princess Samyeop, daughter of King Beopheung. Due to her lineage, Mishil became a jingol (hanja: 眞骨), a collateral noble within the bone rank system
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Hanja
Hanja
Hanja
(Hangul: 한자; Hanja: 漢字; Korean pronunciation: [ha(ː)nt͈ɕa]) is the Korean name
Korean name
for Chinese characters (Chinese: 漢字; pinyin: hànzì).[1] More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters
Chinese characters
borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language
Korean language
with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo (the latter is more used) refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun (한문, 漢文) refers to Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja
Hanja
never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different
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Silla
Silla
Silla
(57 BC[note 1] – 935 AD) (Hangul: 신라; Hanja: 新羅; RR:  Silla
Silla
Korean pronunciation: [ɕil.la]) was a kingdom located in southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula. Silla, along with Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea. Founded by Hyeokgeose of Silla, the dynasty was ruled by the Gyeongju Gim (Kim) (김, 金) clan for most of its 992-year history. It began as a chiefdom in the Samhan
Samhan
confederacies, once allied with China, until it eventually conquered the other two kingdoms, Baekje
Baekje
in 660 and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
in 668. Thereafter, Later Silla
Later Silla
occupied most of the Korean Peninsula, while the northern part re-emerged as Balhae, a successor-state of Goguryeo
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Jijeung Of Silla
Jijeung of Silla
Silla
(437–514) (r. 500–514) was the 22nd ruler of the Korean kingdom of Silla. He is remembered for strengthening royal authority and building Silla
Silla
into a centralized kingdom. Like many Silla
Silla
kings, Jijeung was of royal blood on both sides. His father was the Galmunwang Kim Seup-bo, who was a grandson of Naemul Isageum. His mother was Lady Josaeng, the daughter of Nulji Isageum. Jijeung began his program of legal reform in 502, when he outlawed the custom of burying servants with their masters. In 503, he formally established the country's name as "Silla," it having previously been represented by a variety of Chinese characters
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Galmunwang
Galmunwang (갈문왕, 葛文王; wang=king) was a title used in the early period of the Korean kingdom of Silla. Its precise meaning and function are not known. From Korean sources, namely the Samguk Sagi, it would appear that the title of Galmunwang was granted to very high-ranking personages in early Silla
Silla
and was equivalent to the king but without right of succession. It seems to have been granted to the chiefs of lineages of the clans of the reigning king, queen, and royal mother
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Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation
Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation
Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation
(MBC; Hangul: 문화방송주식회사; Hanja: 文化放送; RR: Munhwa Bangsong Jushikhoesa; lit. "Cultural Broadcasting Corporation") is one of the leading South Korean television and radio network company. Munhwa is the Korean word for "culture". Its flagship terrestrial television station MBC TV
MBC TV
is Channel 11 (LCN) for Digital. Established on December 2, 1961, MBC is a Korean terrestrial broadcaster which has a nationwide network of 17 regional stations. Though it operates on advertising, MBC is a public broadcaster, as its largest shareholder is a public organization, The Foundation of Broadcast Culture
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Uee
Kim Yu-jin (born April 9, 1988), better known by her stage name Uee (sometimes romanized as U-ie), is a South Korean singer and actress. She is best known for being a former member of South Korean girl group After School from 2009 to 2017, and has acted in various television dramas including Queen Seondeok (2009), Ojakgyo Family
Ojakgyo Family
(2011), Jeon Woo-chi (2012), Golden Rainbow (2013), High Society (2015) and Marriage Contract
Marriage Contract
(2016)
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Go Hyun-jung
Go Hyun-jung
Go Hyun-jung
(Hangul: 고현정; born March 2, 1971) is a South Korean actress. She debuted in the entertainment scene as a Miss Korea runner-up in 1989 and went on to star in Sandglass, one of the highest-rated and critically acclaimed dramas in Korean television history. She retired after marrying chaebol Chung Yong-jin
Chung Yong-jin
in 1995, then returned to acting after their divorce in 2003
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Muyeol Of Silla
King Taejong Muyeol(604- 661), born Kim Chun-Chu, was the 29th ruler of Silla, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. He is credited for leading the unification of Korea's Three Kingdom.Contents1 Background 2 Marriage to Kim Yushin's sister 3 Reign 4 Family 5 Ancestry 6 Popular culture 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] King Taejong Muyeol was born with the "sacred bone" rank of seonggol. His father, Kim Yongsu (金龍樹), was a son of Silla's 25th ruler, King Jinji. When King Jinji was overthrown, all royalty from his line, including Kim Yongsu, were deemed unfit to rule over the kingdom. However, as he Yongsu was one of the few remaining seonggols, and married a seonggol princess (King Jinpyeong's daughter Princess Cheonmyeong), their child, Kim Chunchu, became seonggol and thus had a claim to the throne. Kim Yongsu was a powerful figure in the government. However, he lost all of his power to Kim Baekban, the brother of the king
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Jinpyeong Of Silla
Jinpyeong of Silla
Silla
(567? – 632, reign 579 – 632) was the 26th king of the Silla
Silla
Dynasty, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. King Jinpyeong followed in the footsteps of his predecessor, King Jinji, by reorganizing the central ruling system of Silla. Upon the onset of a multitude of conflicts between Baekje
Baekje
and Goguryeo, he sent emissaries to improve relations and strengthen ties between Silla
Silla
and the Chinese dynasties Sui and Tang
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Jinji Of Silla
His birth name was Kim Geumryun, he was the second son of King Jinheung and Queen Sado of Park Clan and became the 25th ruler of Silla
Silla
. He was dethroned three years after his accession.Contents1 Biography 2 Popular culture 3 See also 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] On year 576, Geumryun became the 25th king of Silla. His accession to the throne was full of intrigues, for the reason that; even though he was King Jinheung's son, Silla
Silla
has a policy of passing the throne to the son of the crown prince if ever he failed to take over the throne. And since crown prince Dongryun died before being crowned, his son (King Jinpyeong, later on) should've been the one next in line for the throne. However, after King Jinheung died, Geumryun became the next king of Silla. Some historians believed that, he may have been able to take the throne because of his age
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Three Kingdoms Of Korea
The concept of the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
of Korea (Hangul: 삼국시대) refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje
Baekje
(백제), Silla
Silla
(신라) and Goguryeo
Goguryeo
(고구려). Goguryeo
Goguryeo
was later known as Goryeo
Goryeo
(고려), from which the modern name Korea is derived. The Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period was defined as being from 57 BC to 668 AD (but there existed about 78 tribal states in the southern region of Korean peninsula and relatively big states like Okjeo, Buyeo, and Dongye
Dongye
in its northern part and Manchuria). The three kingdoms occupied the entire Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and most of Manchuria, located in present-day China
China
and Russia
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Samgungnyusa
Samguk Yusa (Korean pronunciation: [sam.ɡuŋ.nju.sa]) or Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms is a collection of legends, folktales and historical accounts relating to the Three Kingdoms of Korea (Goguryeo, Baekje
Baekje
and Silla), as well as to other periods and states before, during and after the Three Kingdoms period. It is the earliest extant record of the Dangun
Dangun
legend, which records the founding of Gojoseon
Gojoseon
as the first Korean nation.Contents1 Authorship and date 2 Historical reliability 3 Editions 4 Notes 5 See also 6 External linksAuthorship and date[edit] The text was written in Classical Chinese, which was used by literate Koreans at the time of its composition
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Samguk Sagi
Samguk sagi
Samguk sagi
(삼국사기, 三國史記, History of the Three Kingdoms) is a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea: Goguryeo, Baekje
Baekje
and Silla. The Samguk sagi
Samguk sagi
is written in Classical Chinese Script, the written language of the literati of ancient Korea, and its compilation was ordered by Goryeo's King Injong (r. 1122-1146) and undertaken by the government official and historian Kim Busik (金富軾) and a team of junior scholars
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Bone Rank System
The bone rank system was the system of aristocratic rank used in the ancient Korean kingdom of Silla. It was used to segregate society, and particularly the layers of the aristocracy, on the basis of their hereditary proximity to the throne and the level of authority they were permitted to wield. The idea of royal blood in other societies is a close analogue to the idea of "sacred bone" in Silla
Silla
thought. Bone rank was strictly hereditary, and thus acted as a caste system. The scholar, Lee Ki-Baik (1984, p. 43) considers it to have probably been adopted as part of the administrative law introduced from China
China
and promulgated by King Beopheung in 520. However, this likely did nothing but institute in legal fact what was already a society segregated by bloodline and lineage
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