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Mirza Aziz Koka
Mirzā Azīz Koka (Khan-i-Azam) (ca. 1542 - 1624) also known as Kotaltash, foster brother of Akbar, who remained one of the leading nobles at the courts of the Mughal emperors Akbar
Akbar
and Jahangir.[1] He also remained Subahdar, governor of the Subah (province) of Gujarat.[2]He was also father in law of Prince Murad And Prince Khusraw.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Later life2 Notes 3 BibliographyBiography[edit] Early life[edit] He was the son of Shams ud-Din Ataga Khan, the Prime Minister of Akbar and Akbar's wet-nurse Jiji Anga, hence his Turkish sobriquet “Koka” or “foster-brother.” [3][4] Ataga Khan
Ataga Khan
was murdered by Adham Khan, the jealous son of Maham Anga, also one of Akbar's wet-nurse in 1562. Thereafter, Aziz Koka built his father tomb next to Nizamuddin Auliya
Nizamuddin Auliya
in Delhi in 1566-67
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Agra Fort
Agra
Agra
Fort
Fort
is a historical fort in the city of Agra
Agra
in India. It was the main residence of the emperors of the Mughal Dynasty
Mughal Dynasty
till 1638, when the capital was shifted from Agra
Agra
to Delhi. The Agra
Agra
fort is a UNESCO
UNESCO
World Heritage site.[1] It is about 2.5 km northwest of its more famous sister monument, the Taj Mahal. The fort can be more accurately described as a walled city.[citation needed]Contents1 History 2 Layout 3 In popular culture 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Diwan-i-AamAfter the First Battle of Panipat
First Battle of Panipat
in 1526, the Babur
Babur
stayed in the fort, in the palace of Ibrahim Lodi. He later built a baoli (step well) in it
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Maham Anga
Maham Anga
Maham Anga
(died 1562) was the chief nurse of the Mughal emperor Akbar. A highly shrewd and ambitious woman, she was the political adviser of the teenage emperor and the de facto regent of the Mughal Empire from 1560 to 1562.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Khairul Manazil 4 In popular culture 5 References 6 Further readingBiography[edit] Maham Anga
Maham Anga
was Akbar's chief nurse prior to his enthronement at age thirteen as Mughal emperor in 1556. Her own son, Adham Khan,[3] as Akbar's foster brother, was regarded as almost one of the imperial family. Maham Anga, shrewd and ambitious and very much in charge of the household and harem, sought to advance her own authority and that of her son
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Nizamuddin Dargah
Nizamuddin Dargah
Dargah
is the dargah (mausoleum) of one of the Sufi
Sufi
saints, Khwaja Nizamuddin Auliya
Nizamuddin Auliya
(1238 - 1325 CE). Situated in the Nizamuddin West area of Delhi, the dargah is visited by thousands of pilgrims every week.[1] The site is also known for its evening qawwali devotionnal music sessions. The descendants of Nizamuddin Auliya
Nizamuddin Auliya
look after the whole management of dargah Sharif
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Chausath Khamba
Chausath Khamba, also spelled Chaunsath Khamba (Urdu: چونسٹھ کھمبا‎, Hindi: चौंसठ खम्बा), is a tomb built during 1623–24. It is located in Nizamuddin precincts of Sufi Muslim shrines and tombs in New Delhi, India. The name means "64 pillars" in Urdu and Hindi. It was built by Mirza Aziz Koka, son of Ataga Khan, as a mausoleum for himself, at the time when Mughal Emperor Jahangir ruled from Delhi. Mirza Aziz Koka had served several times as Jahangir’s Governor of Gujarat before he died in Gujarat.[1][2][3]Contents1 Structure 2 Heritage status 3 Other structures 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] Chausath Khamba monument was initially built as a hall in an innovative eclectic architectural style of the Mughal period. It was later converted into a tomb. It is a square structure constructed entirely of white marble. The structure (pictured with facades) has 64 columns that support twenty five bays. Each bay supports a dome
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Sultan Murad Mirza
Shahzada Murad Mirza
Mirza
(8 June 1570 – 12 May 1599[1]) was a Mughal prince as the second surviving son of Mughal Emperor
Mughal Emperor
Akbar
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Jahangirnama
Jahangirnameh[1] (Persian: جهانگیرنامه‎) is a poem in Persian language
Persian language
which relates the story of Jahangir son of Rostam. It is composed in the same meter as Shahnameh. The author mentions his name as Qāsem-e Mādeḥ in one of the last couplets of the poem. Composed in Herat, it contains nearly 3,600 couplets. Unlike other poems in Persian, Jahangirnameh contains relatively high number of Arabic loanwords, and the stories also were under Islamic influence. According to Zabihullah Safa, this indicates that the poem is composed in late 6th century AH or early 7th century AH. The poem seems to be largely an imitation of the Borzu Nama. In both stories, Rostam's son is brought up in Turan
Turan
by Turanians and unknowingly fights against his Iranian compatriots. But at the end, he is recognized by Iranians and then joins Iranian army. References[edit]^ de Blois, François. "EPICS"
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Khusrau Mirza
Khusrau Mirza (Urdu: خسرو مِرزا‬; 16August 1587 – 26 January 1622) or Prince Khusrau was the eldest son of the Mughal emperor Jahangir.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Rebellion and aftermath 4 Posterity 5 Notes 6 Bibliography 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Khusrau was born in Lahore on August 16, 1587.[3] His mother, Manbhawati Bai (who was given the title Shah Begam after his birth), was the daughter of Raja Bhagwant Das of Amber (Jaipur), head of the Kachhwaha clan of Rajputs. She committed suicide on May 16, 1605 by consuming opium.[4] Family[edit] Khusrau's first wife and chief consort was the daughter of extremely powerful, Mirza Aziz Koka known as Khan Azam, son of Jiji Anga, Emperor Akbar's foster mother
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Man Singh I
Man Singh (Man Singh I) (21 December 1550 – 6 July 1614) was the Rajput
Rajput
Raja
Raja
of Amber, a state later known as Jaipur
Jaipur
in Rajputana
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Nizamuddin Auliya
Muhammad Nizamuddin Auliya
Nizamuddin Auliya
(Urdu: محمد نظام الدّین اولیاء‬‎‎; sometimes spelled Awliya; 1238 – 3 April 1325), also known as Hazrat Nizamuddin, was a Sufi
Sufi
saint of the Chishti Order
Chishti Order
and arguably one of the most famous Sufis on the Indian Subcontinent.[1] His predecessors were Fariduddin Ganjshakar, Qutbuddin Bakhtiyar Kaki
Bakhtiyar Kaki
and Moinuddin Chishti. In that sequence, they constitute the initial spiritual chain or silsila of the Chishti order, widely prevalent in the Indian subcontinent. Nizamuddin Auliya, like his predecessors, stressed love as a means of realising God. For him his love of God implied a love of humanity
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Adham Khan
Adham Khan (1531 – 16 May 1562) was a general of Akbar. He was the younger son of Maham Anga, he thus became the foster brother of Akbar. In his fourth regnal year, Akbar married him to Javeda Begum, the daughter of Baqi Khan Baqlani.[1]Contents1 Conquest of Malwa 2 Execution of Adham Khan and its aftermath 3 Personal life 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 NotesConquest of Malwa[edit]Mughal forces led by Adham Khan, enter the fort of Baz Bahadur of Malwa, 1561, Akbarnama ca. 1590-95.After the dismissal of Bairam Khan, Adham Khan was appointed as a general and was sent to Malwa to capture it. In 1561, the Mughal army led by Adham Khan and Pir Muhammad Khan invaded Malwa. They defeated the army of Baz Bahadur, the Sultan of Malwa in the battle of Sarangpur on March 29, 1561. All his treasures, elephants and his harem was captured by the victors. Adham Khan tried to take possession of Baz Bahadur's Hindu mistress Rani Roopmati also, but she killed herself by consuming poison
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Mughal Empire
The Mughal Empire
Empire
(Urdu: مغلیہ سلطنت‬‎, translit. Mughliyah Saltanat)[8][2] or Mogul Empire[9] was an empire in the Indian subcontinent, founded in 1526
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Wet-nurse
A wet nurse is a woman who breast feeds and cares for another's child.[1] Wet nurses are employed when the mother is unable or elects not to nurse the child herself. Wet-nursed children may be known as "milk-siblings", and in some cultures the families are linked by a special relationship of milk kinship. Mothers who nurse each other's babies are engaging in a reciprocal act known as cross-nursing or co-nursing.Contents1 Reasons 2 Eliciting milk 3 Historical and cultural practices3.1 Mythology 3.2 Ancient Rome 3.3 England 3.4 France 3.5 United States4 Relationships 5 Current attitudes in Western countries 6 Current situation elsewhere 7 Notable wetnurses 8 See also 9 ReferencesReasons[edit] A wet nurse can help when a mother is unable or unwilling to feed her baby
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Gujarat
†The state of Bombay was divided into two states i.e. Maharashtra and Gujarat
Gujarat
by the Bombay (Reorganisation) Act 1960Symbols of Gujarat[4](de facto)Language Gujarati[3]Song "Jai Jai Garavi Gujarat" by Narmad[5]Calendar SakaAnimal Asiatic lion[4]Bird Greater flamingo[4]Flower Marigold (galgota)[4]Fruit Mango[6]Tree Banyan[4] Gujarat
Gujarat
(/ˌɡʊdʒəˈrɑːt/ Gujarat  ['gudʒəɾɑt̪] ( listen)) is a state in Western India[3][7][8][9][10] and Northwest India[11][12][13][14] with an area of 196,024 km2 (75,685 sq mi), a coastline of 1,600 km (990 mi)–most of which lies on the Kathiawar peninsula, and a population in excess of 60 million
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