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Megara
Megara
Megara
(/ˈmɛɡərə/; Greek: Μέγαρα, pronounced [ˈmeɣara]) is a historic town and a municipality in West Attica, Greece. It lies in the northern section of the Isthmus of Corinth
Corinth
opposite the island of Salamis, which belonged to Megara
Megara
in archaic times, before being taken by Athens. Megara
Megara
was one of the four districts of Attica, embodied in the four mythic sons of King Pandion II, of whom Nisos
Nisos
was the ruler of Megara. Megara
Megara
was also a trade port, its people using their ships and wealth as a way to gain leverage on armies of neighboring poleis. Megara
Megara
specialized in the exportation of wool and other animal products including livestock such as horses
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Eastern European Summer Time
Eastern European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(EEST) is one of the names of UTC+3
UTC+3
time zone, 3 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. It is used as a summer daylight saving time in some European and Middle Eastern countries, which makes it the same as Arabia Standard Time, East Africa Time and Moscow
Moscow
Time
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Peloponnesian League
The Peloponnesian League was an alliance in the Peloponnesus
Peloponnesus
from the 6th to the 4th centuries BC, dominated by Sparta. It is known mainly for being one of the two rivals in the Peloponnesian War
Peloponnesian War
(431–404 BC), against the Delian League, which was dominated by Athens.Contents1 Early history 2 League organization 3 Later history of the League 4 External linksEarly history[edit] By the end of the 7th century BC Sparta
Sparta
had become the most powerful city-state in the Peloponnese and was the political and military hegemon over Argos, the next most powerful city-state. Sparta
Sparta
acquired two powerful allies, Corinth
Corinth
and Elis
Elis
(also city-states), by ridding Corinth
Corinth
of tyranny, and helping Elis
Elis
secure control of the Olympic Games
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Thirty Years' Peace
30 (thirty) is the natural number following 29 and preceding 31.Contents1 In mathematics 2 In science2.1 Astronomy3 In other fields 4 History and literature 5 Sports 6 Music 7 ReferencesIn mathematics[edit] Thirty is the sum of the first four squares, which makes it a square pyramidal number.[1]It is a primorial[2] 30 is the smallest sphenic number, and the smallest of the form 2 × 3 × r, where r is a prime greater than 3. 30 has an aliquot sum of 42; the second sphenic number and all sphenic numbers of this form have an aliquot sum 12 greater than themselves. Adding up some subsets of its divisors (e.g., 5, 10 and 15) gives 30, hence 30 is a semiperfect number.[3] 30 is the largest number such that all coprimes smaller than itself, except for 1, are prime.[4] A polygon with thirty sides is called a triacontagon. The icosahedron and the dodecahedron are Platonic solids with 30 edges
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Corinthian Gulf
The Gulf of Corinth or the Corinthian Gulf (Greek: Κορινθιακός Kόλπος, Korinthiakόs Kόlpos) is a deep inlet of the Ionian Sea separating the Peloponnese from western mainland Greece. It is bounded in the east by the Isthmus of Corinth which includes the shipping-designed Corinth Canal and in the west by the Strait of Rion which widens into the shorter Gulf of Patras (part of the Ionian Sea) and of which the narrowest point is crossed since 2004 by the Rio-Antirio Bridge. The gulf is bordered by the large administrative divisions (prefectures): Aetolia-Acarnania and Phocis in the north, Boeotia in the northeast, Attica in the east, Corinthia in the southeast and south and Achaea in the southwest
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Pandion II
Pandion /ˈpændiən/ or /ˈpændiɒn/ may refer to: In Greek mythology[edit]Pandion I, a legendary king of Athens, father of the sisters Procne and Philomela. Pandion II, a legendary king of Athens, father of the brothers Aegeus, Pallas, Nisos and Lycus. Pandion (hero), the eponymous hero of the Attic tribe Pandionis, usually assumed to be one of the legendary Athenian kings Pandion I or Pandion II. Pandion son of Phineus in Greek mythology Pandion, a son of Aegyptus, husband and victim of Callidice, daughter of DanausOther uses[edit]King Pandion, a member of the Pandya Dynasty (c
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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UTC+3
UTC+03:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +03. In areas using this time offset, the time is three hours later than the Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Following the ISO 8601 standard, a time with this offset would be written as, for example, 2018-04-07T14:46:21+03:00 (boldface only here to be clear). Some areas in the world use UTC+03:00 all year, other areas only part of the year.Contents1 As standard time (all year round)1.1 Europe 1.2 Asia1.2.1 Arabia Standard Time1.3 Africa2 As daylight saving time (Northern Hemisphere summer only)2.1 Europe 2.2 Western Asia3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesAs standard time (all year round)[edit] Principal cities: Istanbul, Moscow, Baghdad Europe[edit] Main articles: Further-eastern European Time, Moscow
Moscow
Time, and Time in Turkey Most of European Russia, including Moscow, St
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Postal Codes In Greece
Postal may refer to:The Italian name for Burgstall, South Tyrol
Burgstall, South Tyrol
in northern Italy Paul Postal (born 1936), American linguist Postal (video game series), a series of computer games launch
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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UTC+2
UTC+02:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC of +02. In ISO 8601 the associated time would be written as 2018-04-06T10:17:05+02:00
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Eastern European Time
Eastern European Time
Eastern European Time
(EET) is one of the names of UTC+02:00 time zone, 2 hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Regional Units Of Greece
The 74 regional units (Greek: περιφερειακές ενότητες, perifereiakés enóti̱tes, sing. περιφερειακή ενότητα, perifereiakí̱ enóti̱ta) are administrative units of Greece. They are subdivisions of the country's 13 regions, further subdivided into municipalities
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