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Lswr M7 Class
The LSWR M7 class
LSWR M7 class
is a class of 0-4-4
0-4-4
passenger tank locomotive built between 1897 and 1911. The class was designed by Dugald Drummond
Dugald Drummond
for use on the intensive London
London
network of the London
London
and South Western Railway (LSWR), and performed well in such tasks. Because of their utility, 105 were built and the class went through several modifications over five production batches. For this reason there were detail variations such as frame length
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Dugald Drummond
Dugald Drummond
Dugald Drummond
(1 January 1840 – 8 November 1912) was a Scottish steam locomotive engineer. He had a career with the North British Railway, LB&SCR, Caledonian Railway
Caledonian Railway
and London and South Western Railway. He was the brother of the engineer Peter Drummond. He was a major locomotive designer and builder and many of his London and South Western Railway engines continued in main line service with the Southern Railway to enter British Railways service in 1947.Contents1 Career1.1 Tay bridge disaster 1.2 Further career2 Family 3 Locomotive designs3.1 North British Railway 3.2 Caledonian Railway 3.3 London and South Western Railway4 Patents 5 References 6 External links 7 BibliographyCareer[edit] Drummond was born in Ardrossan, Ayrshire on 1 January 1840. His father was permanent way inspector for the Bowling Railway
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Superheater
A superheater is a device used to convert saturated steam or wet steam into superheated steam or dry steam. Superheated steam is used in steam turbines for electricity generation, steam engines, and in processes such as steam reforming. There are three types of superheaters: radiant, convection, and separately fired
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North British Railway
The North British Railway
North British Railway
was a British railway company, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. It was established in 1844, with the intention of linking with English railways at Berwick. The line opened in 1846, and from the outset the Company followed a policy of expanding its geographical area, and competing with the Caledonian Railway
Caledonian Railway
in particular. In doing so it committed huge sums of money, and in doing so incurred shareholder disapproval that resulted in two chairmen leaving the company. Nonetheless the Company successfully reached Carlisle, where it later made a partnership with the Midland Railway. It also linked from Edinburgh
Edinburgh
to Perth and Dundee, but for many years the journey involved a ferry crossing of the Forth and the Tay. Eventually the North British built the Tay Bridge, but the structure collapsed as a train was crossing in high wind
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LSWR 700 Class
The LSWR 700 class was a class of 30 0-6-0 steam locomotives designed for freight work. The class was designed by Dugald Drummond in 1897 for the London and South Western Railway in England and built by Dübs and Company at that company's Queen's Park works at Polmadie, Glasgow, Scotland.Contents1 Overview 2 Construction and numbering 3 Ownership changes 4 Accidents and incidents 5 Withdrawal 6 Preservation 7 Models 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksOverview[edit] The class was originally numbered 687–716 but the year after delivery numbers 702–716 were given new numbers vacated by engines that had been withdrawn. The locomotives gained the nickname 'Black Motor' early in their career. They were well designed and had few major modifications during the existence of the fleet – the exception being fitted with superheaters from 1919 to 1929, which required the fitting of an extended smokebox
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0-6-0
Under the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
for the classification of steam locomotives, 0-6-0
0-6-0
represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels, six powered and coupled driving wheels on three axles and no trailing wheels. This was the most common wheel arrangement used on both tender and tank locomotives in versions with both inside and outside cylinders. In the United Kingdom, the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
of wheel arrangement was also often used for the classification of electric and diesel-electric locomotives with side-rod coupled driving wheels
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LSWR C8 Class
The LSWR C8 class was a class of 4-4-0 express steam locomotives designed by Dugald Drummond for the London and South Western Railway and introduced in 1898. According to Marshall[1] they "were of orthodox design, very much like engines which Drummond had put on the Caledonian". Marshall gives few other details, except to say that they were numbered 290-299 and had 18in x 26in cylinders. They probably had a short life because little has been published about them. References[edit]^ Marshall, C.F. Dendy (1963). History of the Southern Railway. London: Ian Allan. p. 175. ISBN 071100059X. v t eLSWR Locomotive ClassesJ.V. Gooch 1841–1850Eagle Bison Mazeppa VesuviusJ.H. Beattie 1850–1871Hercules Tartar Sussex Canute Saxon Chaplin Minerva Nelson Nile Tweed Undine Clyde Gem Eagle Falcon Standard 2-4-0WT Lion Volcano 221 231 VesuviusW.G. Beattie 1871–1878273 282 302 318 330 348W
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4-4-0
Under the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement, 4-4-0
4-4-0
represents the arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie, four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and no trailing wheels. Almost every major railroad that operated in North America
North America
in the first half of the 19th century owned and operated locomotives of this type
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H. C. Casserley
Henry Cyril Casserley[1] (12 June 1903 – 16 December 1991)[2] was a British photographer of steam railways. His prolific work in the 1920s and 1930s, the result of travelling to remote corners of the railway network in the United Kingdom and Ireland, has provided subsequent generations with a valuable source of illustrations for books and magazines.Contents1 Life 2 Photography 3 Publication 4 Bibliography of major book publications 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Henry Cyril Casserley was born in Clapham, South London, the son of Edward Casserley, a minor Post Office official, and his wife Sarah (née Turton). Edward Casserley loved mechanical objects and constructed from scratch a model railway in the loft, which may have inspired his son's enthusiasm for trains. Henry spent his working life in the head offices of the Prudential Assurance Company in London (evacuated to Derby
Derby
in World War 2). He married Kathleen Goose on 16 July 1931
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Push-pull Train
Push–pull is a configuration for locomotive-hauled trains, allowing them to be driven from either end of the train, whether having a locomotive at each end or not. A push–pull train has a locomotive at one end of the train, connected via some form of remote control, such as multiple-unit train control, to a vehicle equipped with a control cab at the other end of the train
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Block And Tackle
A block and tackle[1][2] is a system of two or more pulleys with a rope or cable threaded between them, usually used to lift or pull heavy loads. The pulleys are assembled together to form blocks and then blocks are paired so that one is fixed and one moves with the load. The rope is threaded through the pulleys to provide mechanical advantage that amplifies the force applied to the rope.[3] Hero of Alexandria
Hero of Alexandria
described cranes formed from assemblies of pulleys in the first century. Illustrated versions of Hero's "book on raising heavy weights" show early block and tackle systems.[4]Contents1 Overview 2 Mechanical advantage2.1 Rove to (dis)advantage 2.2 Friction3 Snatch block 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit]Various ways of rigging a tackle. All these are "rove to disadvantage"[5] (see below).A block is a set of pulleys or "sheaves" mounted on a single frame
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Footplate
The footplate of a steam locomotive is a large metal plate that rests on top of the frames and is normally covered with wooden floorboards. It is usually the full width of the locomotive and extends from the front of the cab to the rear of cab or coal bunker just above the buffer beam. The boiler, the cab, and other superstructure elements are in turn mounted on the footplate. The footplate does extend beyond the front of the cab on some locomotives, but is then usually referred to as the "running board/plate." The footplate is where the Driver and Fireman stand in the cab to operate the locomotive, giving rise to the expression of working on the footplate[1] for being in the cab of a steam locomotive. The part of the footplate ahead of the cab is referred to by a variety of different names. In the modern age, although the steam locomotive has been phased out, the word footplate remains current coin
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Pneumatics
Pneumatics
Pneumatics
(From Greek: πνεύμα) is a branch of engineering that makes use of gas or pressurized air. Pneumatic systems used in industry are commonly powered by compressed air or compressed inert gases. A centrally located and electrically powered compressor powers cylinders, air motors, and other pneumatic devices
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Robert Urie
Robert Wallace Urie (22 October 1854 – 6 January 1937)[1] was a Scottish locomotive engineer who was the last chief mechanical engineer of the London and South Western Railway.Contents1 Career 2 Locomotive designs 3 Patents 4 Family 5 References 6 Further readingCareer[edit] After serving an apprenticeship with and working for various private locomotive manufacturers he joined the Caledonian Railway
Caledonian Railway
in 1890, and became chief draughtsman, and later Works Manager at St. Rollox railway works under Dugald Drummond. In 1897 he moved with Drummond to join the London and South Western Railway
London and South Western Railway
(LSWR) as works manager at Nine Elms
Nine Elms
in London. He transferred to the new works at Eastleigh in 1909
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LB&SCR D1 Class
The LB&SCR D1 class were powerful 0-4-2 suburban passenger tank locomotives, designed by William Stroudley of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway in 1873. They were originally known as "D-tanks" but later reclassified as class D1. Members of this very successful class survived in service until 1951.Contents1 Background 2 Pre-grouping 3 Post-grouping 4 British Railways 5 Private ownership 6 Accidents and incidents 7 Locomotive summary 8 Descendants 9 References 10 Sources 11 External linksBackground[edit] The D1 class were Stroudley's second tank engine class, intended for heavier tasks than could be undertaken by his A1 class "Terriers" which had been introduced in 1872. They had larger 5' 6" coupled wheels and a 140 psi (970 kPa) boiler pressure
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Smokebox
A smokebox is one of the major basic parts of a steam locomotive exhaust system. Smoke
Smoke
and hot gases pass from the firebox through tubes where they pass heat to the surrounding water in the boiler. The smoke then enters the smokebox, and is exhausted to the atmosphere through the chimney (or funnel). Early locomotives had no smokebox and relied on a long chimney to provide natural draught for the fire but smokeboxes were soon included in the design for two main reasons. Firstly and most importantly, the blast of exhaust steam from the cylinders, when directed upwards through an airtight smokebox with an appropriate design of exhaust nozzle, effectively draws hot gases through the boiler tubes and flues and, consequently, fresh combustion air into the firebox
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