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Login
In computer security, logging in (or logging on or signing in or signing on) is the process by which an individual gains access to a computer system by identifying and authenticating themselves. The user credentials are typically some form of "username" and a matching "password",[1] and these credentials themselves are sometimes referred to as a login, (or a logon or a sign-in or a sign-on).[2][1] In practice, modern secure systems also often require a second factor for extra security. When access is no longer needed, the user can log out (log off, sign out or sign off).Contents1 Procedure 2 History and etymology 3 See also 4 ReferencesProcedureFinger print login, a recent banking security application.Logging in is usually used to enter a specific page, which trespassers cannot see
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Time Sharing
In computing, time-sharing is the sharing of a computing resource among many users by means of multiprogramming and multi-tasking at the same time.[1] Its introduction in the 1960s and emergence as the prominent model of computing in the 1970s represented a major technological shift in the history of computing. By allowing a large number of users to interact concurrently with a single computer, time-sharing dramatically lowered the cost of providing computing capability, made it possible for individuals and organizations to use a computer without owning one,[2] and promoted the interactive use of computers and the development of new interactive applications.Contents1 History1.1 Batch processing 1.2 Time-sharing 1.3 Development 1.4 Time-sharing <
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Utmp
utmp, wtmp, btmp and variants such as utmpx, wtmpx and btmpx are files on Unix-like
Unix-like
systems that keep track of all logins and logouts to the system.Contents1 Format1.1 utmp, wtmp and btmp 1.2 utmpx, wtmpx and btmpx2 Location 3 Related commands 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksFormat[edit] utmp, wtmp and btmp[edit]utmp maintains a full accounting of the current status of the system, system boot time (used by uptime), recording user logins at which terminals, logouts, system events etc. wtmp acts as a historical utmp btmp records failed login attemptsThese files are not regular text files, but rather a binary format which needs to be edited by specially crafted programs. The implementation and the fields present in the file differ depending of the system or the libc version, and are defined in the utmp.h header file
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Password
A password is a word or string of characters used for user authentication to prove identity or access approval to gain access to a resource (example: an access code is a type of password), which is to be kept secret from those not allowed access. The use of passwords is known to be ancient. Sentries would challenge those wishing to enter an area or approaching it to supply a password or watchword, and would only allow a person or group to pass if they knew the password. In modern times, user names and passwords are commonly used by people during a log in process that controls access to protected computer operating systems, mobile phones, cable TV decoders, automated teller machines (ATMs), etc
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OpenID
OpenID
OpenID
is an open standard and decentralized authentication protocol. Promoted by the non-profit OpenID
OpenID
Foundation, it allows users to be authenticated by co-operating sites (known as Relying Parties or RP) using a third party service, eliminating the need for webmasters to provide their own ad hoc login systems, and allowing users to log into multiple unrelated websites without having to have a separate identity and password for each.[1] Users create accounts by selecting an OpenID
OpenID
identity provider, and then use those accounts to sign onto any website which accepts OpenID authentication
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Windows 8
Windows 8
Windows 8
is a personal computer operating system developed by Microsoft
Microsoft
as part of the Windows NT
Windows NT
family of operating systems. Development of Windows 8
Windows 8
started before the release of its predecessor, Windows 7, in 2009. It was announced at CES 2011, and followed by the release of three pre-release versions from September 2011 to May 2012
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Style Guide
A style guide (or manual of style) is a set of standards for the writing and design of documents, either for general use or for a specific publication, organization, or field. (It is often called a style sheet, though that term has other meanings.) A style guide establishes and enforces style to improve communication. To do that, it ensures consistency within a document and across multiple documents and enforces best practice in usage and in language composition, visual composition, orthography and typography
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Guestbook
A guestbook (also guest book, visitor log, visitors' book, visitors' album) is a paper or electronic means for a visitor to acknowledge a visit to a site, physical or web-based, and leave details such as their name, postal or electronic address and any comments. Such paper-based ledgers or books are traditional in churches, at weddings, funerals, B&Bs, museums, schools, institutions and other private facilities open to the public. Some private homes keep visitors' books
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Ship's Log
A logbook (a ship's logs or simply log) is a record of important events in the management, operation, and navigation of a ship. It is essential to traditional navigation, and must be filled in at least daily. The term originally referred to a book for recording readings from the chip log that was used to estimate a ship's speed through the water. Today's ship's log has grown to contain many other types of information, and is a record of operational data relating to a ship or submarine, such as weather conditions, times of routine events and significant incidents, crew complement or what ports were docked at and when. The term logbook has spread to a wide variety of other usages. Today, a virtual or electronic logbook is typically used for record-keeping for complex machines such as nuclear plants or particle accelerators. In military terms, a logbook is a series of official and legally binding documents
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Chip Log
A chip log, also called common log, ship log, or just log, is a navigation tool mariners use to estimate the speed of a vessel through water. The word knot, to mean nautical mile per hour, derives from this measurement method.Contents1 History 2 Construction 3 Use 4 Origins 5 Accuracy and considerations by the navigator 6 More modern logs and replacements 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] All nautical instruments that measure the speed of a ship through water are known as logs.[1] This nomenclature dates back to the days of sail, when sailors tossed a log attached to a rope knotted at regular intervals off the stern of a ship. Sailors counted the number of knots that passed through their hands in a given time to determine the ship's speed. Today, sailors and aircraft pilots still express speed in knots. Construction[edit]Diagram of a chip logShip log and associated kit
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Logbook
A logbook (a ship's logs or simply log) is a record of important events in the management, operation, and navigation of a ship. It is essential to traditional navigation, and must be filled in at least daily. The term originally referred to a book for recording readings from the chip log that was used to estimate a ship's speed through the water. Today's ship's log has grown to contain many other types of information, and is a record of operational data relating to a ship or submarine, such as weather conditions, times of routine events and significant incidents, crew complement or what ports were docked at and when. The term logbook has spread to a wide variety of other usages. Today, a virtual or electronic logbook is typically used for record-keeping for complex machines such as nuclear plants or particle accelerators. In military terms, a logbook is a series of official and legally binding documents
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Linux
Linux
Linux
(/ˈlɪnəks/ ( listen) LIN-əks)[9][10] is a family of free and open-source software operating systems built around the Linux
Linux
kernel. Typically, Linux
Linux
is packaged in a form known as a Linux distribution (or distro for short) for both desktop and server use. The defining component of a Linux distribution
Linux distribution
is the Linux kernel,[11] an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds.[12][13][14] Many Linux
Linux
distributions use the word "Linux" in their name
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OS/2
OS/2
OS/2
is a series of computer operating systems, initially created by Microsoft
Microsoft
and IBM
IBM
under the leadership of IBM
IBM
software designer Ed Iacobucci.[2] As a result of a feud between the two companies over how to position OS/2
OS/2
relative to Microsoft's new Windows 3.1
Windows 3.1
operating environment,[3] the two companies severed the relationship in 1992 and OS/2
OS/2
development fell to IBM
IBM
exclusively.[4] The name stands for "Operating System/2", because it was introduced as part of the same generation change release as IBM's "Personal System/2 (PS/2)" line of second-generation personal computers
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Windows NT
Windows NT
Windows NT
is a family of operating systems produced by Microsoft, the first version of which was released in July 1993. It is a processor-independent, multiprocessing, multi-user operating system. The first version of Windows NT
Windows NT
was Windows NT 3.1
Windows NT 3.1
and was produced for workstations and server computers. It was intended to complement consumer versions of Windows that were based on MS-DOS
MS-DOS
(including Windows 1.0
Windows 1.0
through Windows 3.1x). Gradually, the Windows NT
Windows NT
family was expanded into Microsoft's general-purpose operating system product line for all personal computers, deprecating the Windows 9x
Windows 9x
family. "NT" formerly expanded to "New Technology" but no longer carries any specific meaning
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