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List Of United States Navy Ratings
United States Navy
United States Navy
ratings are general enlisted occupations used by the U.S. Navy from the 18th century, which consisted of specific skills and abilities. Each naval rating had its own specialty badge, which is worn on the left sleeve of the uniform by each enlisted person in that particular field. Working uniforms, such as coveralls and the camouflage Naval Working Uniform, bear generic rate designators with no rating insignia attached. For a brief period from September 2016 to December 2016, ratings were not used. However, they were reintroduced in December 2016 and remain in use.[1] Just as a naval officer has rank, not a rate, an officer's occupation (if drawn more narrowly than an officer of the line) is classified according to designators for both officers of the line (e.g., line officers) and those of the professional staff corps.[2] Ratings should not be confused with rates, which describe the Navy's enlisted pay-grades and ratings
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Aircraft Carrier
An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft.[1] Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighter planes, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. Whilst heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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Oil
An oil is any nonpolar chemical substance that is a viscous liquid at ambient temperatures and is both hydrophobic (immiscible with water, literally "water fearing") and lipophilic (miscible with other oils, literally "fat loving"). Oils have a high carbon and hydrogen content and are usually flammable and surface active. The general definition of oil includes classes of chemical compounds that may be otherwise unrelated in structure, properties, and uses. Oils may be animal, vegetable, or petrochemical in origin, and may be volatile or non-volatile.[1] They are used for food (e.g., olive oil), fuel (e.g., heating oil), medical purposes (e.g., mineral oil), lubrication (e.g. motor oil), and the manufacture of many types of paints, plastics, and other materials
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Steamship
A steamship, often referred to as a steamer, is a type of steam powered vessel, typically ocean-faring and seaworthy, that is propelled by one or more steam engines[1] that typically drive (turn) propellers or paddlewheels. The first steamships came into practical usage during the early 1800s; however, there were exceptions that came before. Steamships usually use the prefix designations of "PS" for paddle steamer or "SS" for screw steamer (using a propeller or screw). As paddle steamers became less common, "SS" is assumed by many to stand for "steam ship". Ships powered by internal combustion engines use a prefix such as "MV" for motor vessel, so it is not correct to use "SS" for most modern vessels. As steamships were less dependent on wind patterns, new trade routes opened up
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Naval Mine
A naval mine is a self-contained explosive device placed in water to damage or destroy surface ships or submarines. Unlike depth charges, mines are deposited and left to wait until they are triggered by the approach of, or contact with, an enemy vessel
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Radar
Radar
Radar
is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft, ships, spacecraft, guided missiles, motor vehicles, weather formations, and terrain. A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna, a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio
Radio
waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar
Radar
was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II
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Torpedo
The modern torpedo is a self-propelled weapon with an explosive warhead, launched above or below the water surface, propelled underwater towards a target, and designed to detonate either on contact with its target or in proximity to it. Historically, it was called an automotive, automobile, locomotive or fish torpedo; colloquially called a fish. The term torpedo was originally employed for a variety of devices, most of which would today be called mines
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Enlisted
An enlisted rank (also known as an enlisted grade or enlisted rate) is, in some armed services, any rank below that of a commissioned officer
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Specialist (rank)
Specialist (abbreviated "SPC") is a military rank in some countries' armed forces. In the United States military, it is one of the four junior enlisted ranks in the U.S. Army, above private first class and equivalent in pay grade to corporal. Unlike corporals, specialists are not considered junior non-commissioned officers (NCOs). Specialist E-4 is the most common rank that is held by US Army soldiers.[1]Contents1 U.S. Army1.1 Trades and specialties (1902–1920) 1.2 Private/specialist (1920–1942) 1.3 Technician (1942–1948) 1.4 Specialist (1955–present) 1.5 Recruits with college degrees and Officer Candidates2 United States Navy
United States Navy
(1941–1974)2.1 Specialists (1941–1948)2.1.1 Specialties (1942–1948)[11]2.2 Emergency Service ratings (1948–1974)3 References 4 External linksU.S. Army[edit] Trades and specialties (1902–1920)[edit]In 1920, the Army rank and pay system received a major overhaul
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Coxswain
The coxswain /ˈkɒksən/ KOK-sən is the person in charge of a boat, particularly its navigation and steering. The etymology of the word gives a literal meaning of "boat servant" since it comes from cock, a cockboat or other small vessel kept aboard a ship, and swain, an Old English term derived from the Old Norse sveinn meaning boy or servant.[1]Contents1 Rowing 2 Navy 3 Naval cadets 4 United States Coast Guard 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksRowing[edit] Main article: Coxswain
Coxswain
(rowing)A women's 4+, a "Four" with coxswain in the sternIn rowing, the coxswain sits in either the bow or the stern of the boat (depending on the type of boat) while verbally and physically controlling the boat's steering, speed, timing and fluidity. The primary duty of a coxswain is to ensure the safety of those in the boat
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Terry McCreary
Admiral Terry L. "T" McCreary (born March 20, 1952) is a retired one-star admiral in the United States Navy and served as the Chief of Naval Information (CHINFO) reporting to the Secretary of the Navy.[1] In this capacity, he oversaw all aspects of the Navy's global public affairs program. Prior to that, McCreary served as Special Assistant to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. His naval career included leadership positions in a variety of naval and joint assignments. McCreary retired from the Navy in 2006 after 27 years of service, then served as the Strategic Communication Director of the U.S. Special Operations Command and the National Counterterrorism Center.Contents1 Early life 2 Navy career 3 Post-Navy career 4 Personal life 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] McCreary was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, to Paul McCreary and Dolores Orcutt Thelen
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Petty Officer Third Class
Petty officer
Petty officer
third class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, above seaman and below petty officer second class, and is the lowest rank of non-commissioned officer, equivalent to a corporal in the U.S. Army and Marine Corps
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Petty Officer Third Class
Petty officer
Petty officer
third class is the fourth enlisted rank in the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and the United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps, above seaman and below petty officer second class, and is the lowest rank of non-commissioned officer, equivalent to a corporal in the U.S. Army and Marine Corps
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Electronics Technician
Electronics Technician
Electronics Technician
(ET) is a common enlisted occupation in the armed forces of many different countries. Common duties for ETs include repair, calibration, and basic maintenance of most electronic equipment.Contents1 United States Navy 2 Australian Defence Force 3 Royal Canadian Navy 4 ReferencesUnited States Navy[edit] Main article: Electronics Technician
Electronics Technician
(United States Navy) There are several variations in the U.S. Navy including the standard Electronics Technician
Electronics Technician
and Aviation Electronics Technician, there is also the similar Electrician's Mate
Electrician's Mate
and Aviation Electrician's Mate. Australian Defence Force[edit] In the Australian Defence Force there are five types of Electronics Technician, the Army has a general purpose Electronics Technician
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Fuel
A fuel is any material that can be made to react with other substances so that it releases energy as heat energy or to be used for work. The concept was originally applied solely to those materials capable of releasing chemical energy but has since also been applied to other sources of heat energy such as nuclear energy (via nuclear fission and nuclear fusion). The heat energy released by reactions of fuels is converted into mechanical energy via a heat engine. Other times the heat itself is valued for warmth, cooking, or industrial processes, as well as the illumination that comes with combustion. Fuels are also used in the cells of organisms in a process known as cellular respiration, where organic molecules are oxidized to release usable energy
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