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List Of Globular Clusters
This is a list of globular clusters. The apparent magnitude does not include an extinction correction. This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.Contents1 Milky Way 2 Local Group 3 References 4 External linksMilky Way[edit] These are globular clusters within the halo of the Milky Way
Milky Way
galaxy. The diameter is in minutes of arc as seen from Earth. For reference, the J2000 epoch celestial coordinates of the Galactic Center
Galactic Center
are R.A.17h 45m 40.04s, Dec. −29° 00′ 28.1″
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ESO
The European Southern Observatory
Observatory
(ESO, formally: European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere; French: Organisation Européenne pour des Recherches Astronomiques dans l'Hémisphere Austral) is a 16-nation intergovernmental research organization for ground-based astronomy. Created in 1962, ESO has provided astronomers with state-of-the-art research facilities and access to the southern sky. The organisation employs about 730 staff members and receives annual member state contributions of approximately €131 million.[1] Its observatories are located in northern Chile. ESO has built and operated some of the largest and most technologically advanced telescopes
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Minute And Second Of Arc
A minute of arc, arcminute (arcmin), arc minute, or minute arc is a unit of angular measurement equal to 1/60 of one degree. Since one degree is 1/360 of a turn (or complete rotation), one minute of arc is 1/7004216000000000000♠21600 of a turn. A minute of arc is π/7004108000000000000♠10800 of a radian. A second of arc, arcsecond (arcsec), or arc second is 1/60 of an arcminute, 1/7003360000000000000♠3600 of a degree, 1/7006129600000000000♠1296000 of a turn, and π/7005648000000000000♠648000 (about 1/7005206265000000000♠206265) of a radian
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Lyra
Lyra
Lyra
(/ˈlaɪrə/; Latin
Latin
for lyre, from Greek λύρα)[2] is a small constellation. It is one of 48 listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and is one of the 88 constellations recognized by the International Astronomical Union. Lyra
Lyra
was often represented on star maps as a vulture or an eagle carrying a lyre, and hence is sometimes referred to as Vultur Cadens or Aquila Cadens ("Falling Vulture"[3] or "Falling Eagle"), respectively. Beginning at the north, Lyra
Lyra
is bordered by Draco, Hercules, Vulpecula, and Cygnus. Lyra
Lyra
is visible from the northern hemisphere from spring through autumn, and nearly overhead, in temperate latitudes, during the summer months
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Coma Berenices
Coma
Coma
is a state of unconsciousness in which a person cannot be awakened; fails to respond normally to painful stimuli, light, or sound; lacks a normal wake-sleep cycle; and does not initiate voluntary actions.[1] A person in a state of coma is described as being comatose. A distinction is made in the medical community between a real coma and a medically induced coma, the former is a result of circumstances beyond the control of the medical community, while the latter is a means by which medical professionals may allow a patient's injuries to heal in a controlled environment. A comatose person exhibits a complete absence of wakefulness and is unable to consciously feel, speak, hear, or move.[2] For a patient to maintain consciousness, two important neurological components must function. The first is the cerebral cortex—the gray matter that forms the outer layer of the brain
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Capricornus
Capricornus
Capricornus
/ˌkæprɪˈkɔːrnəs/ is one of the constellations of the zodiac. Its name is Latin
Latin
for "horned goat" or "goat horn" or "having horns like a goat's", and it is commonly represented in the form of a sea-goat: a mythical creature that is half goat, half fish. Its symbol is (Unicode ♑). Capricornus
Capricornus
is one of the 88 modern constellations, and was also one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy. Under its modern boundaries it is bordered by Aquila, Sagittarius, Microscopium, Piscis Austrinus, and Aquarius. The constellation is located in an area of sky called the Sea or the Water, consisting of many water-related constellations such as Aquarius, Pisces and Eridanus
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Pegasus
Pegasus
Pegasus
(Greek: Πήγασος, Pḗgasos; Latin: Pegasus, Pegasos) is a mythical winged divine stallion, and one of the most recognised creatures in Greek mythology. Usually depicted as pure white, Pegasus is a child of the Olympian god Poseidon, in his role as horse-god. He was foaled by the Gorgon
Gorgon
Medusa[1] upon her death, when the hero Perseus
Perseus
decapitated her. Pegasus
Pegasus
is the brother of Chrysaor
Chrysaor
and the uncle of Geryon. Greco-Roman poets wrote about the ascent of Pegasus
Pegasus
to heaven after his birth, and his subsequent obeisance to Zeus, king of the gods, who instructed him to bring lightning and thunder from Olympus
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Hercules (constellation)
Her genitive = Herculis[1]Pronunciation /ˈhɜːrkjʊliːz/, genitive /ˈhɜːrkjʊlɪs/Symbolism HeraclesRight ascension 17hDeclination +30°Quadrant NQ3Area 1225 sq. deg. (5th)Main stars 14, 22Bayer/Flamsteed stars 106Stars with planets 15Stars brighter than 3.00m 2Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly) 9Brightest star β Her (Kornephoros) (2.78m)Messier objects 2Meteor showers Tau HerculidsBordering constellations Draco Boötes Corona Borealis Serpens
Serpens
Caput Ophiuchus Aquila Sagitta Vulpecula Lyra[1]Visible at latitudes between +90° and −50°. Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of July. Hercules
Hercules
is a constellation named after Hercules, the Roman mythological hero adapted from the Greek hero Heracles
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Serpens
Serpens
Serpens
("the Serpent", Greek Ὄφις) is a constellation of the northern hemisphere. One of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, it remains one of the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. It is unique among the modern constellations in being split into two non-contiguous parts, Serpens
Serpens
Caput (Serpent Head) to the west and Serpens
Serpens
Cauda (Serpent Tail) to the east. Between these two halves lies the constellation of Ophiuchus, the "Serpent-Bearer"
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Scorpius
Scorpius
Scorpius
is one of the constellations of the zodiac. Its name is Latin for scorpion, and its symbol is ( Unicode
Unicode
♏). Scorpius
Scorpius
is one of the 48 constellations identified by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy
Ptolemy
in the second century. It is an ancient constellation that pre-dated the Greeks.[1] It lies between Libra to the west and Sagittarius to the east
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VISTA (telescope)
The VISTA (Visible and Infrared
Infrared
Survey Telescope for Astronomy) is a wide-field reflecting telescope with a 4.1 metre mirror, located at the Paranal Observatory
Paranal Observatory
in Chile. It is operated by the European Southern Observatory and started science operations in December 2009. VISTA was conceived and developed by a consortium of universities in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
led by Queen Mary, University of London[1] and became an in-kind contribution to ESO
ESO
as part of the UK's accession agreement, with the subscription paid by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC).[2] VISTA is a survey telescope working at infrared wavelengths, and is by far the largest telescope in the world dedicated to surveying the sky at near-infrared wavelengths.[2] The telescope has only one instrument: VIRCAM, the Vista InfraRed CAMera
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Aquarius (constellation)
Aquarius is a constellation of the zodiac, situated between Capricornus
Capricornus
and Pisces. Its name is Latin
Latin
for "water-carrier" or "cup-carrier", and its symbol is , a representation of water. Aquarius is one of the oldest of the recognized constellations along the zodiac (the Sun's apparent path).[2] It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations
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Tucana
Tucana
Tucana
is a constellation of stars in the southern sky, named after the toucan, a South American bird. It is one of twelve constellations conceived in the late sixteenth century by Petrus Plancius
Petrus Plancius
from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman. Tucana
Tucana
first appeared on a 35-centimetre-diameter (14 in) celestial globe published in 1598 in Amsterdam by Plancius and Jodocus Hondius and was depicted in Johann Bayer's star atlas Uranometria
Uranometria
of 1603. French explorer and astronomer Nicolas Louis de Lacaille
Nicolas Louis de Lacaille
gave its stars Bayer designations in 1756
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Centaurus
Centaurus
Centaurus
/sɛnˈtɔːrəs/ is a bright constellation in the southern sky. One of the largest constellations, Centaurus
Centaurus
was included among the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd-century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations. In Greek mythology, Centaurus
Centaurus
represents a centaur; a creature that is half human, half horse (another constellation named after a centaur is one from the zodiac: Sagittarius). Notable stars include Alpha Centauri, the nearest star system to the Solar System, its neighbour in the sky Beta Centauri, and V766 Centauri, one of the largest stars yet discovered
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Right Ascension
Right ascension
Right ascension
(abbreviated RA; symbol α) is the angular distance measured eastward along the celestial equator from the Sun
Sun
at the March equinox to the hour circle of the point above the earth in question.[1] When paired with declination, these astronomical coordinates specify the direction of a point on the celestial sphere (traditionally called in English the skies or the sky) in the equatorial coordinate system. Right ascension
Right ascension
and declination as seen on the inside of the celestial sphere
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Canes Venatici
Canes Venatici
Canes Venatici
/ˈkeɪniːz vɪˈnætɪsaɪ/ is one of the 88 official modern constellations. It is a small northern constellation that was created by Johannes Hevelius
Johannes Hevelius
in the 17th century. Its name is Latin for "hunting dogs", and the constellation is often depicted in illustrations as representing the dogs of Boötes
Boötes
the Herdsman, a neighboring constellation. Cor Caroli
Cor Caroli
is the constellation's brightest star, with an apparent magnitude of 2.9. La Superba
La Superba
is one of the reddest stars in the sky and one of the brightest carbon stars
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