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Li Xuejian
Li Xuejian (born July 7, 1954) is a Chinese actor. He is played the role Song Jiang
Song Jiang
in The Water Margin, a 1998 television series adapted from the Chinese classical novel of the same title. Li has also played the roles of military personnel in television series set in the Chinese Civil War. He also acted in the 2006 film The Go Master, which was based on the biography of renowned go player Go Seigen.Contents1 Personal Life 2 Filmography2.1 Film 2.2 Television3 References 4 External linksPersonal Life[edit] In 1983, Li Xuejian married Yu Haidan (于海丹), an actress from Kongzheng Art Troupe
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Hundred Flowers Award For Best Actor
100 or one hundred (Roman numeral: Ⅽ)[1] is the natural number following 99 and preceding 101. In medieval contexts, it may be described as the short hundred or five score in order to differentiate the English and Germanic use of "hundred" to describe the long hundred of six score or 120.Contents1 In mathematics 2 In science 3 In religion 4 In politics 5 In money 6 In other fields 7 In sports 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksIn mathematics[edit] 100 is the square of 10 (in scientific notation it is written as 102). The standard SI prefix
SI prefix
for a hundred is "hecto-". 100 is the basis of percentages (per cent meaning "per hundred" in Latin), with 100% being a full amount. 100 is the sum of the first nine prime numbers, as well as the sum of some pairs of prime numbers e.g., 3 + 97, 11 + 89, 17 + 83, 29 + 71, 41 + 59, and 47 + 53. 100 is the sum of the cubes of the first four integers (100 = 13 + 23 + 33 + 43)
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Li Hongzhang
Li Hongzhang, Marquess Suyi (also romanised as Li Hung-chang) (15 February 1823 – 7 November 1901), GCVO, was a Chinese politician, general and diplomat of the late Qing dynasty. He quelled several major rebellions and served in important positions in the Qing imperial court, including the Viceroy of Zhili, Huguang and Liangguang. Although he was best known in the West for his generally pro-modern stance and importance as a negotiator, Li antagonised the British with his support of Russia as a foil against Japanese expansionism in Manchuria
Manchuria
and fell from favour with the Chinese after their defeat in the First Sino-Japanese War. His image in China remains controversial, with criticism on one hand for political and military mistakes and praise on the other for his success against the Taiping Rebellion, his diplomatic skills defending Chinese interests in the era of unequal treaties, and his role pioneering China's industrial and military modernisation
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Li Dazhao
Li Dazhao
Li Dazhao
(Chinese: 李大釗; October 29, 1888 – April 28, 1927) was a Chinese intellectual who co-founded the Communist Party of China with Chen Duxiu and other early communists in 1921.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Librarian at Peking University 1.3 Co-founder of the CPC 1.4 Death2 Notes 3 ReferencesBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Li was born in Laoting
Laoting
(a county of Tangshan), Hebei
Hebei
province to a peasant family. He started his formal modern education at Yongpingfu Middle school. From 1907 to 1913, he studied at Beiyang College of Politics and Law in Tianjin. From 1914 to 1916, Li studied political economy at Waseda University
Waseda University
in Japan
Japan
before returning to China
China
in 1916
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Yang Changji
Yang Changji (simplified Chinese: 杨昌济; traditional Chinese: 楊昌濟; pinyin: Yáng Chāngjì; 21 April 1871 – 17 January 1920) was a Chinese educator, philosopher, and writer. After advanced studies in Japan and Europe, he taught at Hunan First Normal University, where he exerted considerable influence on Mao Zedong, Cai Hesen, Xiao Zisheng, and others, and then at Peking University.[1][2][3] He became considered one of the leading philosophers of his generation before his early death.[4][5]Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Works 4 Notes 5 References and further readingBiography[edit] Yang was born in Changsha County of Changsha prefecture in Hunan Province of China during the Qing Dynasty. During his childhood, Yang studied at Cheng-Zhu school. He first attended school at the age of 7. In 1898, Yang was accepted to Yuelu Academy. He promoted democracy and supported Kang Youwei and Liang Qichao. After the Hundred Days' Reform, he retired into the country
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Just Another Pandora's Box
Just Another Pandora's Box, also known as Once Upon a Chinese Classic, is a 2010 Hong Kong parody film directed by Jeffrey Lau, starring Ronald Cheng, Gigi Leung, Betty Sun, Eric Tsang, Huang Bo, Guo Degang, Gillian Chung, and Patrick Tam. It is a spiritual successor to Lau's two-part 1995 film A Chinese Odyssey. Athena Chu, who starred in A Chinese Odyssey, makes a guest appearance in Just Another Pandora's Box. The film's Chinese title is a pun on the Chinese title of the first part of A Chinese Odyssey, Yuè Guāng Bǎo Hé (月光寶盒). The last three characters of each title are the same, only the first differs; the pronunciations of 月 and 越 are the same in both Cantonese (jyut6) and Mandarin (yuè)
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Qin Shi Huang
Huang-LaoHuangdi Sijing HuainanziEarly figuresGuan Zhong Zichan Deng Xi Li Kui Wu QiFounding figuresShen Buhai Duke Xiao of Qin Shang Yang Shen Dao Zhang Yi Xun Kuang Han Fei Li Si Qin Shi HuangHan figuresJia Yi Liu An Emperor Wen of Han Emperor Wu of Han Chao Cuo Gongsun Hong Zhang Tang Huan Tan Wang Fu Zhuge LiangLater figuresEmperor Wen of Sui Du You Wang Anshi Li Shanchang Zhang Juzheng Xu Guangqiv t e Qin Shi Huang
Qin Shi Huang
(Chinese: 秦始皇; literally: "First Emperor of Qin",  pronunciation (help·info)) or Shihuangdi (Chinese: 始皇帝; literally: "First Emperor"; 18 February 259 BC – 10 September 210 BC) was the founder of the Qin dynasty
Qin dynasty
(秦朝) and was the first emperor of a unified China. He was born Ying Zheng (嬴政) or Zhao Zheng (趙政), a prince of the state of Qin
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Keep Cool (film)
Keep Cool (simplified Chinese: 有话好好说; traditional Chinese: 有話好好說; pinyin: Yǒu Huà Hǎo Hǎo Shuō; literally: "If you have something to say, say it nicely") is a 1997 Chinese black comedy directed by Zhang Yimou
Zhang Yimou
and adapted from the novel Evening Papers News by Shu Ping. The film about a bookseller in love in 1990s Beijing, marked a move away from earlier period pictures of Zhang's earlier work to a more realistic Cinéma vérité-like period in his career that also saw him make Happy Times
Happy Times
(2000) and Not One Less
Not One Less
(1999). Keep Cool also marked only the second time Zhang placed his film in the modern era and the first time Zhang did not work with actress Gong Li. The film was produced by the Guangxi Film Studio.Contents1 Synopsis 2 Style 3 Censorship 4 Cast 5 References 6 External linksSynopsis[edit] The film is set in modern-day Beijing
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Go Seigen
Wu Qingyuan (Chinese: 吳清源)[notes 2] (June 12, 1914 – November 30, 2014), better known by the Japanese pronunciation of his name, Go Seigen (ご せいげん), was a Chinese-born Japanese master of the game of Go
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Chinese Civil War
Chinese Communist victoryMajor combat ended, but no armistice or peace treaty signed Small pockets of insurgency continued through the 1960sTerritorial changes Communist Party of China
Communist Party of China
takeover of mainland China
China
and Hainan People's Republic of
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Water Margin
Water Margin[1] is a Chinese novel attributed to Shi Nai'an. Considered one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature, the novel is written in vernacular Chinese rather than Classical Chinese.[2] The story, set in the Song dynasty, tells of how a group of 108 outlaws gather at Mount Liang (or Liangshan Marsh) to form a sizable army before they are eventually granted amnesty by the government and sent on campaigns to resist foreign invaders and suppress rebel forces
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Song Jiang
Song Jiang
Song Jiang
was the leader of a group of Chinese outlaws who lived in the Song dynasty. The outlaws were active in the present-day provinces of Shandong
Shandong
and Henan
Henan
before their eventual surrender to the Song government. Song Jiang
Song Jiang
is also featured as a character in Water Margin, one of the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature. He ranks 1st of the 36 Heavenly Spirits of the 108 Liangshan heroes and is nicknamed "Protector of Justice".Contents1 Life 2 In fiction2.1 Background 2.2 Killing Yan Poxi 2.3 Becoming an outlaw 2.4 As chief of Liangshan 2.5 Death3 Song Jiang's seditious poem 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit] Song Jiang
Song Jiang
is mentioned in historical texts dating from the end of the reign of Emperor Huizong of Song. His place of birth and where he had been active are in dispute
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