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Lady Charlotte Harley
Lady Charlotte Mary Bacon, née Harley (12 December 1801 – 9 May 1880), was the second daughter of Edward Harley, 5th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer.[1] Her beauty as a child prompted Lord Byron
Lord Byron
to dedicate the first two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
Childe Harold's Pilgrimage
to her, under the name "Ianthe".[2] Lord Byron
Lord Byron
had been one of the many lovers of her mother, Jane Elizabeth Scott. Lady Charlotte was also the subject of the painting Lady Charlotte Harley as Hebe by Richard Westall. According to Byron biographer Benita Eisler, Byron sexually molested Lady Charlotte when she was eleven years old. (Byron: Child of Passion, Fool of Fame, Benita Eisler, Alfred A
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Charlotte Bacon (other)
Charlotte Bacon
Charlotte Bacon
(1801-1880) was an English aristocrat, muse to Lord Byron, and namesake of Charlotte Waters, Northern Territory. Charlotte Bacon
Charlotte Bacon
may also refer to: Charlotte Bacon
Charlotte Bacon
(author), American author, published short story collection A Private State Charlotte Bacon
Charlotte Bacon
(2006 – 2012), victim in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting Charlotte Bacon, wife of homeopath George Napoleon EppsThis disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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G. R. McMinn
Gilbert Rotherdale McMinn
Gilbert Rotherdale McMinn
CE, SM, FRGS (1841 – 18 October 1924) was an Australian
Australian
surveyor born in Ireland noted for his work in the Northern Territory
Northern Territory
surveying the Overland Telegraph Line. His middle name is occasionally spelt "Rutherdale".Contents1 Early life 2 Later life and death 3 Recognition 4 Family 5 Publications 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] McMinn was born in Newry, County Down. He was the son of a bank manager, Joseph McMinn (c. 1794 – 6 April 1874) and his wife Martha, née Hamill or Hammill (c. 1805 – 13 December 1861), who sailed with their eight children aboard the Albatross and arrived at Port Adelaide in September 1850
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National Trust For Places Of Historic Interest Or Natural Beauty
The National Trust, formally the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, is a conservation organisation in England, Wales
Wales
and Northern Ireland, and the largest membership organisation in the United Kingdom.[citation needed] The trust describes itself as "a charity that works to preserve and protect historic places and spaces—for ever, for everyone".[2] The trust was founded in 1895 and given statutory powers, starting with the National Trust Act 1907. Historically, the trust tended to focus on English country houses, which still make up the largest part of its holdings, but it also protects historic landscapes such as in the Lake District, historic urban properties, and nature reserves. In Scotland, there is an independent National Trust for Scotland
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The Canberra Times
The Canberra
Canberra
Times is a daily newspaper, published by Fairfax Media
Fairfax Media
in Canberra.Contents1 History1.1 Foundation—1920s 1.2 Later years 1.3 Editorial staff2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Foundation—1920s[edit] The
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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William Pickering (publisher)
William Pickering (2 April 1796 – 27 April 1854)[1] was an English publisher, notable for introducing cloth binding to British publishing.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Book series published 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Pickering began working as an antiquarian bookseller before 1820, and quickly moved into publishing. In 1819 he began publishing a series of Diamond Classics, miniature books[3] set in tiny type that were offered in a uniform binding of cloth or leather at an affordable price of 6 shillings. These are probably the first publishers' bindings in cloth, an innovation which had a rapid and profound impact on the publishing industry. Pickering also published original work: from 1828 he became Samuel Taylor Coleridge's publisher, as well as bringing out the first edition in ordinary typography of William Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience
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Charles Todd (pioneer)
Sir Charles Todd KCMG FRS FRAS FRMS FIEE[2](7 July 1826 – 29 January 1910) worked at the Royal Greenwich
Greenwich
Observatory 1841–1847 and the Cambridge University observatory from 1847 to 1854. He then worked on telegraphy and undersea cables until engaged by the government of South Australia
South Australia
as astronomical and meteorological observer, and head of the electric telegraph department.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Arrival in Adelaide 3 Transcontinental line 4 Postmaster General of South Australia 5 Meteorological work 6 Government Electrician 7 Astronomical work 8 Surveying 9 Other Achievements 10 Later career 11 Death and legacy 12 ReferencesEarly life and career[edit] Todd was the son of grocer Griffith Todd[3] and Mary Parker;[4] he was born at Islington, London, the third of five children. Shortly after Charles's birth the family moved to Greenwich, where his father set up as a wine and tea merchant
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Charlotte Waters, Northern Territory
Charlotte Waters, Northern Territory, is located close to the South Australian border. It was located in 1871 by surveyors McMinn and Knuckey during construction of the Australian Overland Telegraph Line. According to explorer Ernest Giles, it was named for Lady Charlotte Bacon.[1] In 1872, a telegraph repeater, post office and general store were built. References[edit]^ Giles, Ernest (1889). Australia twice traversed: the romance of exploration, being a narrative compiled from the journals of five exploring expeditions into and through Central South Australia, and Western Australia, from 1872 to 1876, Volume 1. S. Low, Marston, Searle & Rivington, LimitedExternal links[edit]Charlotte Waters (NT) at Flinders Ranges ResearchCoordinates: 25°55′S 134°55′E / 25.917°S 134.917°E / -25.917; 134.917This Northern Territory
Northern Territory
geography article is a stub
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Lord Byron
George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron
Baron Byron
FRS (22 January 1788 – 19 April 1824), known as Lord Byron, was an English nobleman, poet, peer, politician, and leading figure in the Romantic movement. He is regarded as one of the greatest British poets[1] and remains widely read and influential
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South Australia
South Australia
Australia
(abbreviated as SA) is a state in the southern central part of Australia. It covers some of the most arid parts of the country. With a total land area of 983,482 square kilometres (379,725 sq mi), it is the fourth-largest of Australia's states and territories by area, and fifth largest by population. It has a total of 1.7 million people, and its population is the most highly centralised of any state in Australia, with more than 75 percent of South Australians
South Australians
living in the capital, Adelaide, or its environs
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Richard Westall
Richard Westall RA (2 January 1765 – 4 December 1836) was an English painter and illustrator of portraits, historical and literary events, best known for his portraits of Byron. He was also Queen Victoria's drawing master.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit]George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron by Richard WestallWestall was the more successful of two half-brothers (both sons of a Benjamin Westall, from Norwich) who both became painters. His younger half-brother was William Westall (1781–1850), a much-travelled landscape painter. Born on 2 January 1765 in Reepham near Norwich (where he was baptised at All Saints on 13 January in the same year), Richard Westall moved to London after the death of his mother and the bankruptcy of his father in 1772
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Canto
The canto (Italian pronunciation: [ˈkanto]) is a principal form of division in a long poem.[1] The word canto is derived from Italian word for "song" or singing; which is derived from the Latin cantus, for "a song", from the infinitive verb canere—to sing.[1][2] The use of the canto was described in the 1911 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica as " a convenient division when poetry was more usually sung by the minstrel to his own accompaniment than read".[1] There is no specific format, construction, or style for a canto and it is not limited to any one type of poetry. Famous poems that employ the canto division are Luís de Camões' Os Lusíadas (10 cantos), Lord Byron's Don Juan (17 cantos, the last of which unfinished), Valmiki's Ramayana
Ramayana
(500 cantos[3]), Dante's The Divine Comedy (100 cantos[4]), and Ezra Pound's The Cantos
The Cantos
(116 cantos). Footnotes[edit]^ a b c  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Canto"
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Jane Harley, Countess Of Oxford And Countess Mortimer
Jane Elizabeth Harley (née Scott), Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer (1774–1824) was an English noblewoman, known as a patron of the Reform movement and a lover of Lord Byron.Contents1 Life 2 Children 3 References 4 SourcesLife[edit] She was a daughter of the Reverend James Scott, M.A., Vicar of Itchen Stoke in Hampshire and was brought up in favour of French Revolutionary thought and Reform. In 1794 she married Edward Harley, 5th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer (with her father taking the service), being styled Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer. She was a friend of the Princess of Wales. She frequently took lovers from among the pro-Reform party during her marriage, firstly Francis Burdett and most notably Lord Byron (the affair lasting from 1812, in the aftermath of Byron's affair with Lady Caroline Lamb, when he was fourteen years her junior, until 1813, when she and her husband went abroad but Byron did not follow as she had hoped)
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Edward Harley, 5th Earl Of Oxford And Earl Mortimer
Edward Harley, 5th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer (20 February 1773 – 30 December 1848) was an English nobleman. Harley was the son of John Harley (dean of Windsor) and Roach Vaughan. Edward succeeded to the titles and estates (including the Harley family seat at Brampton Bryan) of his father's elder brother Edward Harley, 4th Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer on the 4th Earl's death without issue in 1790. In 1803 Henry Bickersteth became the Earl's medical attendant whilst the Earl was on a tour of Italy, staying with him until 1805. Edward became Bickersteth's friend and patron and in 1835 Bickersteth married the earl's eldest daughter
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