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Kaiko Maru
IMO Number: Callsign:Notes: Spotter Ship for ICRThe Kaikō Maru (海幸丸) was the spotter ship for the Japanese whaling fleet. In 2007, it collided with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society vessel MY Robert Hunter and was disabled.[1] It sent out a mayday and the Robert Hunter, Farley Mowat, and the Esperanza responded until the Kaiko Maru was repaired. It has since been sold to Specialised Vessel Services as a guard ship and renamed the Frobisher. References[edit]^ Japanese whaler, anti-whaling ship collide, China Economic Net, February 15, 2007v t eWhaling fleet of the Institute of Cetacean Research
Institute of Cetacean Research
(ICR)Factory shipsNisshin MaruHarpoon shipsYūshin Maru Yūshin Maru
Yūshin Maru
No. 2 Yushin Maru No
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Institute Of Cetacean Research
The Institute of Cetacean Research: (ICR, 日本鯨類研究所, Nihon Geirui Kenkyūjo) is a non-profit organisation in Japan which claims to be a research organization specializing in the "biological and social sciences related to whales".[1] Its methods include lethal sampling techniques which have been the source of international controversy over the validity and necessity of the research. Several environmental groups and governments oppose this program, claiming it to be commercial whaling in disguise, which is banned by the International Whaling Commission
International Whaling Commission
(IWC).Contents1 History 2 Regulations 3 Research programs3.1 JARPA 3.2 JARPA II 3.3 JARPN 3.4 JARPN II4 Controversy4.1 Disputes over research 4.2 Financial
Financial
subsidies5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The Institute of Cetacean Research
Institute of Cetacean Research
was founded in 1987
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MV Shōnan Maru 2
The Shōnan Maru 2 (第二昭南丸, Daini Shōnan Maru) is a Japanese security vessel, operated by the Japanese Fisheries Agency.Contents1 Sister ships 2 Design and Appearance 3 Altercations with Sea Shepherd Conservation Society 4 Seizure by Russia 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksSister ships[edit] The Shōnan Maru 2 has a sister ship, the Shōnan Maru. The Shōnan Maru was sold to the Misaki Fisheries High School and was replaced by the Yūshin Maru
Yūshin Maru
No
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Sperm Whale
Physeter catodon Linnaeus, 1758 Physeter australasianus Desmoulins, 1822The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) or cachalot /ˈkæʃəˌlɒt, ˈkæʃəˌloʊ/ is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia. The sperm whale is a pelagic mammal with a worldwide range, and will migrate seasonally for feeding and breeding.[3] Females and young males live together in groups while mature males live solitary lives outside of the mating season. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every four to twenty years, and care for the calves for more than a decade
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Sei Whale
The sei whale (/ˈseɪ/ or /ˈsaɪ/) ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
borealis) is a baleen whale, the third-largest rorqual after the blue whale and the fin whale.[3] It inhabits most oceans and adjoining seas, and prefers deep offshore waters.[4] It avoids polar and tropical waters and semienclosed bodies of water
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Fin Whale
The fin whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
physalus), also known as finback whale or common rorqual and formerly known as herring whale or razorback whale, is a marine mammal belonging to the parvorder of baleen whales. It is the second-largest mammalian on the Earth after the blue whale.[7] The largest reportedly grow to 27.3 m (89.6 ft) long[8] with a maximum confirmed length of 25.9 m (85 ft),[9] a maximum recorded weight of nearly 74 tonnes (73 long tons; 82 short tons),[10] and a maximum estimated weight of around 114 tonnes (112 long tons; 126 short tons). American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews
Roy Chapman Andrews
called the fin whale "the greyhound of the sea ... for its beautiful, slender body is built like a racing yacht and the animal can surpass the speed of the fastest ocean steamship."[11] The fin whale's body is long and slender, coloured brownish-grey with a paler underside
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Common Minke Whale
The common minke whale or northern minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) is a species of minke whale within the suborder of baleen whales. It is the smallest member of the rorquals and the second smallest species of baleen whale. Although first ignored by whalers due to its small size and low oil yield, it began to be exploited by various countries beginning in the early 20th century. As other species declined larger numbers of common minke whales were caught, largely for their meat. It is now one of the primary targets of the whaling industry
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Bryde's Whale
Bryde's whale
Bryde's whale
or the Bryde's whale
Bryde's whale
complex (/bruːdə/BREW-də) putatively comprises two species of rorqual and maybe three. The "complex" means the number and classification remains unclear because of a lack of definitive information and research. The common Bryde's whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
brydei, Olsen, 1913) is a larger form that occurs worldwide in warm temperate and tropical waters, and the Sittang or Eden's whale (B. edeni, Anderson, 1879) is a smaller form that may be restricted to the Indo-Pacific.[2] Also, a smaller, coastal form of B. brydei is found off southern Africa, and perhaps another form in the Indo-Pacific
Indo-Pacific
differs in skull morphology, tentatively referred to as the Indo-Pacific
Indo-Pacific
Bryde's whale. The recently described Omura's whale (B. omurai, Wada et al
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Antarctic Minke Whale
The Antarctic
Antarctic
minke whale or southern minke whale (Balaenoptera bonaerensis) is a species of minke whale within the suborder of baleen whales. It is the second smallest rorqual after the common minke whale and the third smallest baleen whale. Although first scientifically described in the mid-19th century, it was not recognized as a distinct species until the 1990s. Once ignored by the whaling industry due to its small size and low oil yield, the Antarctic
Antarctic
minke was able to avoid the fate of other baleen whales and maintained a large population into the 21st century, numbering in the hundreds of thousands.[4] Surviving to become the most abundant baleen whale in the world, it is now one of the mainstays of the industry alongside its cosmopolitan counterpart the common minke
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Kaiko Maru
IMO Number: Callsign:Notes: Spotter Ship for ICRThe Kaikō Maru (海幸丸) was the spotter ship for the Japanese whaling fleet. In 2007, it collided with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society vessel MY Robert Hunter and was disabled.[1] It sent out a mayday and the Robert Hunter, Farley Mowat, and the Esperanza responded until the Kaiko Maru was repaired. It has since been sold to Specialised Vessel Services as a guard ship and renamed the Frobisher. References[edit]^ Japanese whaler, anti-whaling ship collide, China Economic Net, February 15, 2007v t eWhaling fleet of the Institute of Cetacean Research
Institute of Cetacean Research
(ICR)Factory shipsNisshin MaruHarpoon shipsYūshin Maru Yūshin Maru
Yūshin Maru
No. 2 Yushin Maru No
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Yushin Maru No. 3
The Yushin Maru No. 3 (第三勇新丸, Daisan Yūshin Maru) is a Japanese-registered whale catcher that undertakes whaling operations in the North Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean. Along with other vessels of the Japanese whaling fleet, its efforts and the ensuing conflict with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society have been featured on American television, in the documentary-style reality series Whale Wars.[4] The Yūshin Maru No. 3 was built in 2007, and is thus the youngest ship of the Japanese whaling fleet. The Yūshin Maru No. 3 replaces the Kyo Maru No
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IMO Number
The International Maritime Organization
International Maritime Organization
(IMO) number is a unique reference for ships and for registered ship owners and management companies. IMO numbers were introduced under the SOLAS Convention to improve maritime safety and security and to reduce maritime fraud
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Yūshin Maru No. 2
The Yūshin Maru No. 2 (第二勇新丸, Daini Yūshin Maru) is a Japanese-registered whale catcher that undertakes whaling operations in the North Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean. Along with other vessels of the Japanese whaling fleet, its efforts and the ensuing conflict with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society have been featured on American television since 2008, in the documentary-style reality series Whale Wars.[3] Sea Shepherd confrontations[edit] On January 15, 2008, two members (Ben Potts and Giles Lane) of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, traveling on the MV Steve Irwin, boarded the Yūshin Maru No. 2 without permission. They were accordingly detained on board the ship for two days before being transferred to the Australian customs vessel MV Oceanic Viking. During their detainment, they were offered whale meat for dinner.[4] On February 6, 2009, the MV Steve Irwin collided with the Yūshin Maru No
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Yūshin Maru
The Yūshin Maru (勇新丸, Yūshin Maru) is a Japanese-registered whale catcher that undertakes whaling operations in the North Pacific Ocean and Southern Ocean. Along with other vessels of the Japanese whaling fleet, its efforts and the ensuing conflict with the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society have been featured on American television since 2008, in the documentary-style reality series Whale Wars.[3] Gallery[edit]Yūshin Maru with a WhaleYūshin Maru with a WhaleSee also[edit]Whaling in Japan Institute of Cetacean ResearchReferences[edit]^ a b "YUSHINMARU: ship particulars". Fleetmon.com. Retrieved 5 January 2015.  ^ a b c d Matsuoka, K.; Tamura, T.; Mori, M; Isoda, T.; Yoshida, T.; Moriyama, R.; Yamaguchi, F.; Yoshimura, I.; Wada, Atsushi; Nakai, Kazuyoshi; Tsunekawa, Masaomi; Ogawa, Tomoyuki (June 2012)
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Nisshin Maru
The 8,145-ton vessel MV Nisshin Maru (日新丸) is the primary vessel[4] of the Japanese whaling fleet and is the world's only whaler factory ship.[5] It is also the largest member, and flagship of the five-member whaling fleet, headed by research leader Shigetoshi Nishiwaki. The ship is based in Japan in Shimonoseki harbor,[6] and is owned by Tokyo-based company Kyodo Senpaku Kaisha Ltd which is a subsidiary of the Institute of Cetacean Research.[7]Minke whales, including a 1-year-old juvenile, being loaded aboard Nisshin Maru. This photograph was taken in the Southern Ocean by agents from the Australian Customs and Border Protection Service vessel, during a 2008 surveillance mission.[8]Contents1 History 2 2007 Antarctic voyage 3 Other incidents 4 IMO regulations 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] There have been several Japanese factory whaling ships named Nisshin Maru.[9] After the U.S
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