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Ixcuina
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Tlazolteotl
Tlazolteotl
(or Tlaçolteotl, Nahuatl Tlazōlteōtl Nahuatl pronunciation: [tɬaso:ɬˈteo:tɬ]) is a goddess of purification, steam bath, midwives, filth, and a patroness of adulterers. In Nahuatl, the word tlazōlli can refer to vice and diseases. Thus, Tlazolteotl
Tlazolteotl
was a goddess of filth (sin), vice, and sexual misdeeds
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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Mixcoatl
Mixcoatl
Mixcoatl
(Nahuatl languages: Mixcōhuātl, [miʃˈkoːwaːt͡ɬ] from mixtli [ˈmiʃt͡ɬi] "cloud" and cōātl [ˈkoːaːt͡ɬ] "serpent"), or Camaztle [kaˈmaʃt͡ɬe] from camaz "deer sandal" and atle "without",[1] or Camaxtli, was the god of the hunt and identified with the Milky Way, the stars, and the heavens in several Mesoamerican cultures. He was the patron deity of the Otomi, the Chichimecs, and several groups that claimed descent from the Chichimecs. While Mixcoatl
Mixcoatl
was part of the Aztec
Aztec
pantheon, his role was less important than Huitzilopochtli, who was their central deity
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Mictlantecuhtli
Mictlāntēcutli (Nahuatl pronunciation: [mik.t͡ɬaːn.ˈtéːkʷ.t͡ɬi], meaning "Lord of Mictlan"), in Aztec
Aztec
mythology, was a god of the dead and the king of Mictlan
Mictlan
(Chicunauhmictlan), the lowest and northernmost section of the underworld. He was one of the principal gods of the Aztecs
Aztecs
and was the most prominent of several gods and goddesses of death and the underworld
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Piltzintecuhtli
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Piltzintecuhtli [piɬt͡sinˈtekʷt͡ɬi] was a god of the rising sun, healing,[1] and visions, associated with Tonatiuh. The name means "the Young Prince". It may have been another name for Tonatiuh, but he is also mentioned as a possibly unique individual, the husband of Xochiquetzal
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Tepeyollotl
In Aztec mythology, Tepēyōllōtl Nahuatl pronunciation: [tepeːˈju˕ːɬːu˕ːtɬ] ("heart of the mountains"; also Tepeyollotli) was the god of earthquakes, echoes and jaguars. He is the god of the Eighth Hour of the Night, and is depicted as a jaguar leaping towards the sun. In the calendar, Tepeyollotl
Tepeyollotl
rules over both the third day, Calli (house), and the third trecena, 1-Mazatl (deer). He is the eighth Lord of the Night.[1] The word is derived as a compound of the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
words tepētl ("mountain"), and yōllōtl ("heart" or "interior"). Tepeyollotl
Tepeyollotl
is usually depicted as cross-eyed holding the typical white staff with green feathers
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Xiuhtecuhtli
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Xiuhtecuhtli
Xiuhtecuhtli
[ʃiʍˈtekʷt͡ɬi] ("Turquoise Lord" or "Lord of Fire"),[3] was the god of fire, day and heat.[4] He was the lord of volcanoes,[5] the personification of life after death, warmth in cold (fire), light in darkness and food during famine. He was also named Cuezaltzin [kʷeˈsaɬt͡sin] ("flame") and Ixcozauhqui [iʃkoˈsaʍki],[6] and is sometimes considered to be the same as Huehueteotl
Huehueteotl
("Old God"),[7] although Xiuhtecuhtli
Xiuhtecuhtli
is usually shown as a young deity.[8] His wife was Chalchiuhtlicue
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Lords Of The Day
In Aztec mythology
Aztec mythology
the Lords of the Day (Classical Nahuatl: Tonalteuctin)[citation needed] are a set of thirteen gods that ruled over a particular day corresponding to one of the thirteen heavens.[citation needed] They were cyclical, so that same god recurred every thirteen days. In the Aztec
Aztec
calendar, the lords of the day are[1]Xiuhtecuhtli, god of fire and time. Tlaltecuhtli, god of the earth. Chalchiuhtlicue, goddess of water, lakes, rivers, seas, streams, horizontal waters, storms and baptism. Tonatiuh, god of the sun. Tlazolteotl, goddess of lust, carnality, sexual misdeeds. Mictlantecuhtli, god of the underworld. Centeotl, goddess[2] of maize
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Citlalicue
In Aztec mythology, Citlalicue (Nahuatl pronunciation: [sitɬaːˈlikʷe]) "star garment"; also Citlalinicue ( Nahuatl
Nahuatl
pronunciation: [sitɬaːliˈnikʷe]), Ilamatecuhtli ( Nahuatl
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Mictecacihuatl
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Mictēcacihuātl (pronounced [mik.teː.ka.ˈsí.waːt͡ɬ], literally "Lady of the Dead") is Queen of Mictlan, the underworld, ruling over the afterlife with Mictlantecuhtli, another deity who is her husband.[1] Her role is to watch over the bones of the dead and preside over the ancient festivals of the dead. These festivals evolved from Aztec traditions into the modern Day of the Dead
Day of the Dead
after synthesis with Spanish traditions. She now presides over the contemporary festival as well. She is known as the "Lady of the Dead", since it is believed that she was born, then sacrificed as an infant. Mictecacihuatl
Mictecacihuatl
was represented with a defleshed body and with jaw agape to swallow the stars during the day.[2] Notes[edit]^ Miller & Taube 1993, 2003, p.113. ^ Fernández 1992, 1996, p.142.See also[edit]Santa MuerteReferences[edit]Fernández, Adela (1992, 1996)
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Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
In Aztec religion, Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
( Nahuatl
Nahuatl
for "Lord of the Dawn"; [t͡ɬaːwiskaɬpanˈtekʷt͡ɬi]) is the god of the planet Venus, the morning star. Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
Tlahuizcalpantecuhtli
was considered a dangerous and malevolent god, and was associated with Quetzalcoatl.[1] The word comes from tlahuizcalpan [t͡ɬaːwisˈkaɬpan] "dawn" and tecuhtli [ˈtekʷt͡ɬi] "lord".[2]Contents1 Myths 2 Effects 3 Calendar 4 Notes 5 ReferencesMyths[edit] Motolinia's Memoriales, the Histoyre du Mechique and the Annals of Cuauhtitlan relate that the Toltec
Toltec
ruler Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl
Quetzalcoatl
became the morning star when he died
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Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
[t͡ɬaɬteˈkʷt͡ɬi] is a pre-Columbian Mesoamerican deity, identified from sculpture and iconography dating to the Late Postclassic period of Mesoamerican chronology
Mesoamerican chronology
(ca. 1200–1519), primarily among the Mexica
Mexica
(Aztec) and other Nahuatl-speaking cultures. Tlaltecuhtli
Tlaltecuhtli
is also known from several post-conquest manuscripts that surveyed Mexica
Mexica
mythology and belief systems, such as the Histoyre du méchique compiled in the mid-16th century.[1] According to Alfonso Caso[2] there were four earth gods - Tlaltecuhtli who was male and three earth goddesses - Coatlique, Cihuacoatl
Cihuacoatl
and Tlazolteotl
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Tonatiuh
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Tonatiuh
Tonatiuh
(Nahuatl: Ōllin Tōnatiuh [oːlːin toːˈnatiʍ] "Movement of the Sun") was the sun god.[1] The Aztec people considered him the leader of Tollan, heaven. He was also known as the fifth sun, because the Aztecs believed that he was the sun that took over when the fourth sun was expelled from the sky.Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksDescription[edit] Aztec
Aztec
theology held that each sun was a god with its own cosmic era, the Aztecs believed they were still in Tonatiuh's era. According to the Aztec
Aztec
creation myth, the god demanded human sacrifice as tribute and without it would refuse to move through the sky
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Xolotl
In Aztec
Aztec
mythology, Xolotl
Xolotl
(Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈʃolot͡ɬ] ( listen)) was the god with associations to both lightning and death. He was associated with the sunset and would guard the Sun
Sun
as it traveled through the underworld every night. Dogs were associated with Xolotl. This deity and a dog were believed to lead the soul on its journey to the underworld.[1] He was commonly depicted as a monstrous dog. Xolotl
Xolotl
was the god of fire and lightning.[2] He was also god of twins, monsters, misfortune, sickness, and deformities. Xolotl
Xolotl
is the canine brother and twin of Quetzalcoatl,[3] the pair being sons of the virgin Coatlicue
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Lords Of The Night
In Mesoamerican mythology
Mesoamerican mythology
the Lords of the Night
Lords of the Night
(Classical Nahuatl: Yoalteuctin[citation needed]) are a set of nine gods who each ruled over every ninth night forming a calendrical cycle. Each lord was associated with a particular fortune, bad or good, that was an omen for the night that they ruled over.[1] The lords of the night are known in both the Aztec
Aztec
and Maya calendar, although the specific names of the Maya Night Lords are unknown.[2] The glyphs corresponding to the night gods are known and mayanists identify them with labels G1 to G9, the G series. Generally, these glyphs are frequently used with a fixed glyph coined F. The only Mayan light lord that has been identified is the God G9, Pauahtun
Pauahtun
the Aged Quadripartite God.[3][4] The existence of a 9 nights cycle in Mesoamerican calendrics was first discovered in 1904 by Eduard Seler
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Yacatecuhtli
In Aztec mythology, Yacatecuhtli
Yacatecuhtli
(pronounced Ya-te-coo-tli) was the patron god of commerce and travelers, especially business travelers. His symbol is a bundle of sticks. Merchants would carry an uttal cane as they moved from village to village peddling their wares, and at night-time would tie them together into a neat bundle before sprinkling them with blood from their ears. It was believed that this ritual in Yacatecuhtli's honor would guarantee success in future business ventures, not to mention protection from vicious beasts and robbers on their journeys. His name means "lord of the nose" (Nahuatl yacatl, nose and tecuhtli, lord). [1] References[edit]^ "YACATECUHTLI". www.godslaidbare.com
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