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Indian Pone
Cornbread
Cornbread
is any quick bread containing cornmeal. They are usually leavened by baking powder.[1]Contents1 History 2 Types of cornbread2.1 Baked cornbread 2.2 Cracklin' bread 2.3 Corn pone 2.4 Hot water cornbread 2.5 Johnnycakes 2.6 Hushpuppies3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 External linksHistory[edit]Cornbread, prepared as a muffinNative Americans had been using ground corn (maize) for food thousands of years[2] before European explorers arrived in the New World.[3] European settlers, especially those who resided in the English Southern Colonies, learned the original recipes and processes for corn dishes from the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek, and soon they devised recipes for using cornmeal in breads similar to those made of grains available in Europe. Cornbread
Cornbread
has been called a "cornerstone" of the Cuisine of the Southern United States
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Cornbread (other)
Cornbread
Cornbread
is a generic name for any number of quick breads (a bread leavened chemically, rather than by yeast) containing cornmeal. It may also refer to: Cornbread
Cornbread
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Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
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Hominy Grits
Grits
Grits
is a porridge made from corn (maize) that is ground into a coarse meal and then boiled. Hominy
Hominy
grits is a type of grits made from hominy, corn that has been treated with an alkali in a process called nixtamalization with the cereal germ removed. Grits
Grits
is often served with other flavorings[1] as a breakfast dish, usually savory
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Alcoholic Beverage
An alcoholic drink, or alcoholic beverage, is a drink that contains alcohol (ethanol), a depressant which in low doses causes euphoria, reduced anxiety, and sociability and in higher doses causes drunkenness, stupor and unconsciousness. Long-term use can lead to alcohol abuse, physical dependence, and alcoholism. Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in many cultures. Most countries have laws regulating the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[1] Some countries ban such activities entirely, but alcoholic drinks are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic drink industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.[2] Alcohol
Alcohol
is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world
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Chicha
In South and Central America, chicha is a fermented (alcoholic) or non-fermented beverage usually derived from grains, maize, or fruit.[1][need quotation to verify], [2][need quotation to verify] Chicha
Chicha
includes corn beer, known as chicha de jora, and non-alcoholic beverages such as chicha morada
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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Fritters
A fritter is a fried food usually consisting of a portion of batter[1][2] or breading which has been filled with bits of meat, seafood, fruit,[3] vegetables or other ingredients.[4][3] Fritters are prepared in both sweet and savory varieties.[4]Contents1 Varieties1.1 China 1.2 India 1.3 Indonesia 1.4 Iran 1.5 Japan 1.6 Korea 1.7 Malaysia 1.8 Myanmar 1.9 New Zealand 1.10 Philippines 1.11 South Africa 1.12 Thailand 1.13 United Kingdom 1.14 United States2 See also 3 References 4 External linksVarieties[edit] China[edit] Throughout China, fritters are sold at roadsides. They may contain pork, but are commonly vegetarian.Riproduci file multimedialeA couple making fritters in Hainan, China
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Johnnycake
Johnnycake
Johnnycake
(also called journey cake, shawnee cake or johnny bread) is a cornmeal flatbread. An early American staple food, it is prepared on the Atlantic coast from Newfoundland to Jamaica.[1] The food originates from the native inhabitants of North America. It is still eaten in the West Indies, Dominican Republic, Saint Croix, Bahamas, Colombia, and Bermuda[2] as well as in the United States
United States
and Canada. The modern johnnycake is found in the cuisine of New England,[3] and often claimed as originating in Rhode Island.[4] A modern johnnycake is fried cornmeal gruel, which is made from yellow or white cornmeal mixed with salt and hot water or milk, and sometimes sweetened
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Southern Cooking
The cuisine of the Southern United States
Southern United States
developed in the traditionally defined American South, influenced by African, English, Scottish, Irish, French, Spanish, and Native American cuisines. Tidewater, Appalachian, Creole, Lowcountry, and Floribbean
Floribbean
are examples of types of Southern cuisine. In recent history, elements of Southern cuisine have spread north, having an effect on the development of other types of American cuisine. Many elements of Southern cooking—squash, corn (and its derivatives, including grits), and deep-pit barbecuing—are borrowings from southeast American Indian tribes such as the Caddo, Choctaw, and Seminole. Sugar, flour, milk, and eggs come from Europe; the Southern fondness for fried foods is Scottish, and the old-fashioned Virginian use of ragouts comes from the West Country of England
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Pudding
Pudding
Pudding
is a type of food that can be either a dessert or a savory dish. The word pudding is believed to come from the French boudin, originally from the Latin botellus, meaning "small sausage", referring to encased meats used in medieval European puddings.[1] The modern usage of the word pudding to denote primarily desserts has evolved over time from the almost exclusive use of the term to describe savory dishes, specifically those created using a process similar to sausages where meat and other ingredients in a mostly liquid form are encased and then steamed or boiled to set the contents. Black pudding, Yorkshire pudding, and haggis survive from this tradition. In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and some of the Commonwealth countries, the word pudding can be used to describe both sweet and savory dishes
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Blue Corn
Blue Corn (c. 1920 – May 3, 1999), also known as Crucita Calabaza, was a Native American potter from San Ildefonso Pueblo, New Mexico, in the United States. She became famous for reviving San Ildefonso polychrome wares and had a very long and productive career.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Death 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Her grandmother first introduced her to pottery making at the age of three. Maria Martinez’s sister gave her the name “Blue Corn” during the naming ceremony, which is the Native American tradition of naming a child. Blue Corn attended school at the pueblo in her early years. She then went to Santa Fe Indian School, which was 24 miles (39 km) from home. While attending school in Santa Fe, her mother and father died, and she was sent to live with relatives in southern California
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Spoon
A spoon is a utensil consisting of a small shallow bowl(also known as a head), oval or round, at the end of a handle. A type of cutlery (sometimes called flatware in the United States), especially as part of a place setting, it is used primarily for serving. Spoons are also used in food preparation to measure, mix, stir and toss ingredients. Present day spoons are made from metal (notably flat silver or silverware, plated or solid), wood, porcelain or plastic.Contents1 History 2 Types and uses 3 Language and culture 4 Manufacture 5 Derivatives 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistorySpoon,Yurok (Native American), 19th century, Brooklyn MuseumPreserved examples of various forms of spoons used by the ancient Egyptians include those composed of ivory, flint, slate and wood; many of them carved with religious symbols.[1] During the Neolithic Ozieri civilization in Sardinia, ceramic ladles and spoons were already in use
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Tortilla
In North America
North America
and Central America, a corn tortilla or just tortilla (/tɔːrˈtiːə/, Spanish: [torˈtiʎa]) is a type of thin, unleavened flatbread, made from finely ground maize (corn). In Guatemala
Guatemala
and Mexico, there are three colors of maize dough for making tortillas: white maize, yellow maize and blue maize (or black maize). An influential 2002 study by Matsuoka et al. has demonstrated that, rather than the multiple independent domestications model, all maize arose from a single domestication in southern Mexico
Mexico
about 9,000 years ago
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Barbecue
Barbecue
Barbecue
or barbeque (informally BBQ or barbie) is both a cooking method and an apparatus/machine. Barbecuing is done slowly over low, indirect heat and the food is flavored by the smoking process, while grilling, a related process, is generally done quickly over moderate-to-high direct heat that produces little smoke. Barbecue
Barbecue
can refer to the cooking method itself, the meat cooked this way, the cooking apparatus/machine used (the "barbecue grill" or simply "barbecue"), or to a type of social event featuring this type of cooking. Barbecuing is usually done outdoors by smoking the meat over wood or charcoal. Restaurant barbecue may be cooked in large, specially-designed brick or metal ovens. Barbecue
Barbecue
is practiced in many areas of the world and there are numerous regional variations. Barbecuing techniques include smoking, roasting or baking, braising and grilling
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