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Hyla Cinerea
Calamita cinerea Schneider, 1799 Hyla
Hyla
viridis Holbrook, 1842 Hyla
Hyla
cinerea Garman, 1892 Hyla
Hyla
carolinensis Cope, 1889The American green tree frog
American green tree frog
( Hyla
Hyla
cinerea) is a common species of New World tree frog belonging to the genus Hyla. A common backyard species, it is popular as a pet, and is the state amphibian of Georgia and Louisiana.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution and habitat 3 Behavior3.1 Breeding 3.2 Feeding4 As pets 5 References 6 External linksDescription[edit] The frog is green, medium-sized, and up to 6 cm (2.5 in) long. Their bodies are usually green in shades ranging from bright yellowish-olive to lime green. The color can change depending on lighting or temperature
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Conservation Status
The conservation status of a group of organisms (for instance, a species) indicates whether the group still exists and how likely the group is to become extinct in the near future
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Grass
Gramineae Juss.Blades of grass Poaceae
Poaceae
(Poe-ay-see-ay) or Gramineae (Grammy-nee-ay) is a large and nearly ubiquitous family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as grasses. Poaceae
Poaceae
includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns and pasture. Grasses have stems that are hollow except at the nodes and narrow alternate leaves borne in two ranks. The lower part of each leaf encloses the stem, forming a leaf-sheath
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Southeast Florida
South Florida
Florida
is a region of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Florida, comprising the southernmost part of the state. It is one of Florida's three most common "directional" regions, the others being Central Florida
Florida
and North Florida. It includes the populous Miami
Miami
metropolitan area, the Florida
Florida
Keys, and other localities
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Central Texas
Central Texas
Texas
is a region in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
Texas
surrounding Austin and roughly bordered by Brady to Kerrville to La Grange to Waco. Central Texas
Texas
contains the Texas
Texas
Hill Country and corresponds to a physiographic section designation within the Edwards Plateau, in a geographic context.[1] Central Texas
Texas
includes the Austin–Round Rock, Killeen-Temple-Fort Hood, Bryan–College Station, and Waco metropolitan areas. The Austin–Round Rock and Killeen-Temple- Fort Hood
Fort Hood
areas are among the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the state. Some of the largest cities in the region are Austin, College Station, Killeen, Round Rock, and Waco
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Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
(/ˈdɛləwɛər/ ( listen))[10] is one of the 50 states of the United States, located in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the north by Pennsylvania, and to the east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.[11] Delaware
Delaware
occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula. It is the second smallest and sixth least populous state, but the sixth most densely populated. Delaware
Delaware
is divided into three counties, the lowest number of any state. From north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex
Sussex
County
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New Jersey
New Jersey
Jersey
is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the Northeastern United States. It is a peninsula, bordered on the north and east by the state of New York; on the east, southeast, and south by the Atlantic Ocean; on the west by the Delaware River
Delaware River
and Pennsylvania; and on the southwest by the Delaware Bay
Delaware Bay
and Delaware. New Jersey
Jersey
is the fourth-smallest state by area but the 11th-most populous, with 9 million residents as of 2017,[20] and the most densely populated of the 50 U.S. states
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Monotypic Taxon
In biology, a monotypic taxon is a taxonomic group (taxon) that contains only one immediately subordinate taxon.[1] A monotypic species is one that does not include subspecies or smaller, infraspecific taxa.[citation needed] In the case of genera, the term "unispecific" or "monospecific" is sometimes preferred. In botanical nomenclature, a monotypic genus is a genus in the special case where a genus and a single species are simultaneously described.[2] In contrast an oligotypic taxon contains more than one but only a very few subordinate taxa. Examples[edit] Just as the term monotypic is used to describe a taxon including only one subdivision, one can also refer to the contained taxon as monotypic within the higher-level taxon, e.g. a genus monotypic within a family
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Cline (biology)
In biology and ecology, an ecocline or simply cline (from Greek: κλίνω "to possess or exhibit gradient, to lean") is an ecotone[jargon] in which a series of biocommunities display a continuous gradient.[1] The term was coined by the English evolutionary biologist Julian Huxley
Julian Huxley
in 1938. More technically, clines consist of ecotypes or forms of species that exhibit gradual phenotypic and/or genetic differences over a geographical area, typically as a result of environmental heterogeneity. Genetically, clines result from the change of allele frequencies within the gene pool of the group of taxa in question.[2][3][4] Clines may manifest in time and/or space.[5]Contents1 Gradient analysis 2 Ring species 3 See also 4 ReferencesGradient analysis[edit] In ecology, spatial clines have led to gradient analysis where the abundance and distribution of organisms is rendered by sinusoidal curves on the plane
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Atlantic Coastal Plain
The Atlantic coastal plain
Atlantic coastal plain
is a physiographic region of low relief along the East Coast of the United States. It extends 2,200 miles (3,500 km) from the New York Bight[2][3] southward to a Georgia/ Florida
Florida
section of the Eastern Continental Divide, which demarcates the plain from the ACF River Basin
ACF River Basin
in the Gulf Coastal Plain to the west. The province is bordered on the west by the Atlantic Seaboard fall line and the Piedmont plateau, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and to the south by the Floridian province
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Selection (biology)
Natural selection
Natural selection
is the differential survival and reproduction of individuals due to differences in phenotype. It is a key mechanism of evolution, the change in the heritable traits characteristic of a population over generations. Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
popularised the term "natural selection", contrasting it with artificial selection, which is intentional, whereas natural selection is not. Variation exists within all populations of organisms. This occurs partly because random mutations arise in the genome of an individual organism, and offspring can inherit such mutations. Throughout the lives of the individuals, their genomes interact with their environments to cause variations in traits
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Genetic Drift
Genetic drift
Genetic drift
(also known as allelic drift or the Sewall Wright effect[1]) is the change in the frequency of an existing gene variant (allele) in a population due to random sampling of organisms.[2] The alleles in the offspring are a sample of those in the parents, and chance has a role in determining whether a given individual survives and reproduces. A population's allele frequency is the fraction of the copies of one gene that share a particular form.[3] Genetic drift
Genetic drift
may cause gene variants to disappear completely and thereby reduce genetic variation. When there are few copies of an allele, the effect of genetic drift is larger, and when there are many copies the effect is smaller. In the early 20th century, vigorous debates occurred over the relative importance of natural selection versus neutral processes, including genetic drift
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Aquatic Plant
Aquatic plants are plants that have adapted to living in aquatic environments (saltwater or freshwater). They are also referred to as hydrophytes or macrophytes. These plants require special adaptations for living submerged in water, or at the water's surface. The most common adaptation is aerenchyma, but floating leaves and finely dissected leaves are also common.[1][2][3] Aquatic plants can only grow in water or in soil that is permanently saturated with water. They are therefore a common component of wetlands.[4] The principal factor controlling the distribution of aquatic plants is the depth and duration of flooding. However, other factors may also control their distribution, abundance, and growth form, including nutrients, disturbance from waves, grazing, and salinity.[4] Aquatic vascular plants have originated on multiple occasions in different plant families;[1][5] they can be ferns or angiosperms (including both monocots and dicots)
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Cattail
Typha
Typha
/ˈtaɪfə/ is a genus of about 30 species of monocotyledonous flowering plants in the family Typhaceae. These plants have many common names, in British English
British English
as bulrush, or reedmace,[2] in American English
American English
as cattail,[3] punks, or corn dog grass, in Australia as cumbungi or bulrush, in Canada
Canada
as bulrush or cattail, and in New Zealand as raupō. Other taxa of plants may be known as bulrush, including some sedges in Scirpus
Scirpus
and related genera. The genus is largely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere, where it is found in a variety of wetland habitats. The rhizomes are edible
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Range (biology)
In biology, the range or distribution of a species is the geographical area within which that species can be found. Within that range, dispersion is variation in local density. The term is often qualified:Sometimes a distinction is made between a species' natural, endemic, or native range where it historically originated and lived, and the range where a species has more recently established itself
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Pond
A pond is a body of standing water, either natural or artificial, that is usually smaller than a lake.[1] They may arise naturally in floodplains as part of a river system, or they may be somewhat isolated depressions (examples include vernal pools and prairie potholes). They might contain shallow water with marsh and aquatic plants and animals.[2] The type of life in a pond is generally determined by a combination of factors including water level regime (particularly depth and duration of flooding) and nutrient levels, but other factors may also be important, including presence or absence of shading by trees, presence or absence of streams, effects of grazing animals, and salinity.[3] Ponds are frequently human-constructed. In the countryside farmers and villagers dig a pond in their backyard or increase the depth of an existing pond by removing layers of mud during summer season. A wide variety of artificial bodies of water are classified as ponds
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