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Horse Gait
Horse
Horse
gaits are the various ways in which a horse can move, either naturally or as a result of specialized training by humans.[1]Contents1 Classification 2 Walk 3 Trot 4 Canter and gallop4.1 Canter 4.2 Gallop5 Pace 6 "Ambling" gaits 7 References 8 External linksClassification[edit] Gaits are typically categorized into two groups: the "natural" gaits that most horses will use without special training, and the "ambling" gaits that are various smooth-riding four-beat footfall patterns that may appear naturally in some individuals, but which usually occur only in certain breeds
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Heredity
Heredity
Heredity
is the passing on of traits from parents to their offspring, either through asexual reproduction or sexual reproduction, the offspring cells or organisms acquire the genetic information of their parents. Through heredity, variations between individuals can accumulate and cause species to evolve by natural selection. The study of heredity in biology is genetics.Contents1 Overview 2 Relation to theory of evolution 3 History3.1 Gregor Mendel: father of genetics 3.2 Modern development of genetics and heredity 3.3 Common genetic disorders4 Types4.1 Dominant and recessive alleles5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOverview[edit] Heredity
Heredity
of phenotypic traits: Father
Father
and son with prominent ears and crowns. DNA
DNA
structure
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Thomas Eakins
Thomas Cowperthwait Eakins (July 25, 1844 – June 25, 1916) was an American realist painter, photographer,[1] sculptor, and fine arts educator. He is widely acknowledged to be one of the most important artists in American art history.[2][3] For the length of his professional career, from the early 1870s until his health began to fail some 40 years later, Eakins worked exactingly from life, choosing as his subject the people of his hometown of Philadelphia. He painted several hundred portraits, usually of friends, family members, or prominent people in the arts, sciences, medicine, and clergy
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Trail Riding
Trail
Trail
riding is riding outdoors on trails, bridle paths, and forest roads, but not on roads regularly used by motorised traffic. A trail ride can be of any length, including a long distance, multi-day trip. It originated with horse riding, and in North America, the equestrian form is usually called "trail riding," or, less often "hacking." In the UK and Europe, the practice is usually called horse or pony trekking. The modern term also encompasses mountain biking, mixed terrain cycle-touring, and the use of motorcycles and other motorized all-terrain vehicles. It may be informal activities of an individual or small group, or larger events organized by a club. Some equestrian trail rides in the USA are directed by professional guides or outfitters, particularly at guest ranches. In some parts of the world, trail riding (of whatever kind) is limited by law to recognized, and sometimes function-specific, trails that are waymarked
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Camel
Camelus bactrianus Camelus dromedarius Camelus ferus †Camelus gigas (fossil)[1] † Camelus moreli (fossil) †Camelus sivalensis (fossil)[2]SynonymsListCamellus Molina, 1782 Dromedarius Gloger, 1841A camel is an even-toed ungulate in the genus Camelus that bears distinctive fatty deposits known as "humps" on its back. There are three surviving species of camel: the one-humped dromedary (which makes up 94% of the world's camel population), and the two-humped Bactrian and wild Bactrian species. Camels have long been domesticated and, as livestock, they provide food (milk and meat) and textiles (fiber and felt from hair)
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Secretariat (horse)
Sanford Stakes (1972) Hopeful Stakes (1972) Futurity Stakes (1972) Laurel Futurity (1972) Garden State Futurity (1972) Bay Shore Stakes (1973) Gotham Stakes (1973) Arlington Invitational (1973) Marlboro Cup (1973) Man o' War Stakes (1973) Canadian International (1973) Triple Crown race wins: Kentucky Derby
Kentucky Derby
(1973) Preakness Stakes
Preakness Stakes
(1973) Belmont Stakes
Belmont Stakes
(1973)Awards9th U.S. Triple Crown Champion (1973) American Champion Two-Year-Old Colt (1972) American Champion Three-Year-Old Male Horse (1973) American Champion Male Turf Horse (1973) American Horse of the Year (1972, 1973) Leading broodmare sire in North America (1992)HonorsU.S
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Biometrics
Biometrics
Biometrics
is the technical term for body measurements and calculations. It refers to metrics related to human characteristics. Biometrics
Biometrics
authentication (or realistic authentication)[note 1] is used in computer science as a form of identification and access control.[1][2] It is also used to identify individuals in groups that are under surveillance. Biometric
Biometric
identifiers are the distinctive, measurable characteristics used to label and describe individuals.[3] Biometric
Biometric
identifiers are often categorized as physiological versus behavioral characteristics.[4] Physiological characteristics are related to the shape of the body. Examples include, but are not limited to fingerprint, palm veins, face recognition, DNA, palm print, hand geometry, iris recognition, retina and odour/scent
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Equix
Equix is a company in Lexington, Kentucky, founded in 1984. The company evaluates equine biometrics and motion through the use of high-speed digital tools for the purpose of finding athletic potential.[1] Their products are used mainly on two-year-old Thoroughbred
Thoroughbred
racehorses at training sales.[2] Equix uses the measurements of horses in order to predict potential, and in so doing helps clients select both racehorses and breeding matches.[3] Equix has published several studies with the results of their analysis. One study found that colts and fillies with below average jaw widths will have a higher probability of becoming graded stakes winners than horses with above average jaw widths
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Leland Stanford
Amasa Leland Stanford
Leland Stanford
(March 9, 1824 – June 21, 1893) was an American tycoon, industrialist, politician, and the founder (with his wife, Jane) of Stanford University.[1] Migrating to California
California
from New York at the time of the Gold Rush, he became a successful merchant and wholesaler, and continued to build his business empire. He spent one two-year term as Governor of California
California
after his election in 1861, and later eight years as a senator from the state. As president of Southern Pacific Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
and, beginning in 1861, Central Pacific, he had tremendous power in the region and a lasting impact on California
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Furlong
A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one-eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains. Using the international definition of the inch as exactly 25.4 millimetres, one furlong is 201.168 metres. However, the United States does not uniformly use this conversion ratio. Older ratios are in use for surveying purposes in some states, leading to variations in the length of the furlong of about two parts per million, or 0.4 millimetres (​1⁄64 inch). This variation is too small to have many practical consequences. Five furlongs are about 1.0 kilometre (1.00584 km is the exact value, according to the international conversion).Contents1 History 2 Use 3 Conversion to SI units 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The name furlong derives from the Old English words furh (furrow) and lang (long)
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Guinness Book Of World Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 62nd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
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Predation
In an ecosystem, predation is a biological interaction where a predator (an organism that is hunting) feeds on its prey (the organism that is attacked).[1] Predators may or may not kill their prey prior to feeding on it, but the act of predation often results in the death of the prey and the eventual absorption of the prey's tissue through digestion
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Théodore Géricault
Jean-Louis André Théodore Géricault
Théodore Géricault
(French: [ʒɑ̃ lwi ɑ̃dʁe teodoʁ ʒeʁiko]; 26 September 1791 – 26 January 1824) was an influential French painter and lithographer, known for The Raft of the Medusa and other paintings
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Passage (dressage)
The passage is a movement seen in upper-level dressage, in which the horse performs a highly elevated and extremely powerful trot. The horse is very collected and moves with great impulsion.extended trotThe passage differs from the working, medium, collected, and extended trot in that the horse raises a diagonal pair high off the ground and suspends the leg for a longer period than seen in the other trot types. The hindquarters are very engaged, and the knees and hocks are flexed more than the other trot types. The horse appears to trot in slow motion, making it look as if it is dancing. The passage is first introduced in the dressage intermediaire test II
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Polo
Polo
Polo
is a team sport played on horseback. The objective is to score goals against an opposing team. Players score by driving a small hard white ball into the opposing team's goal using a long-handled wooden mallet. The modern sport of polo is played on a grass field of 300 by 160 yards (270 by 150 m). Each polo team consists of four riders and their polo ponies. Arena polo has three players per team and the game usually involves more maneuvering and shorter plays at lower speeds due to space limitations of arenas. Arena polo is played with a small air-filled ball, similar to a small football. The modern game usually lasts one to two hours and is divided into periods called chukkas (or "chukkers"). Polo
Polo
is played professionally in 16 countries
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