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Hollandsche Maatschappij Van Wetenschappen
A van is a type of road vehicle used for transporting goods or people. Depending on the type of van it can be bigger or smaller than a truck and SUV, and bigger than a common car. There is some varying in the scope of the word across the different English-speaking countries. The smallest vans, microvans, are used for transporting either goods or people in tiny quantities. Mini MPVs, Compact MPVs, and MPVs are all small vans usually used for transporting people in small quantities. Larger vans with passenger seats are used for institutional purposes, such as transporting students. Larger vans with only front seats are often used for business purposes, to carry goods and equipment. Specially-equipped vans are used by television stations as mobile studios
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Van (Dutch)
van is a preposition in the Dutch and Afrikaans languages, meaning "of" or "from" depending on the context (similar to de and di in the Romance languages). van is a very common prefix in Dutch language
Dutch language
surnames, where it is known as a tussenvoegsel. In those cases it nearly always refers to a certain, often quite distant, ancestor's place of origin or residence; for example, Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
"from Bettenhoven"[1] and Rembrandt van Rijn "from the Rhine".[note 1] In surnames, it can appear by itself or in combination with an article (compare French de la, de l'). The most common cases of this are van de, van der and van den, where the articles are all current or archaic forms of the article de "the". Less common are van het and van 't, which use the similar but neutral article het
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Covered Goods Wagons
A covered goods wagon or van is a railway goods wagon which is designed for the transportation of moisture-susceptible goods and therefore fully enclosed by sides and a fixed roof. They are often referred to simply as covered wagons, and this is the term used by the International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
(UIC). Since the introduction of the international classification for goods wagons by the UIC in the 1960s a distinction has been drawn between ordinary and special covered wagons
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Toyota LiteAce
The Toyota
Toyota
LiteAce and TownAce are a line of light commercial and derivative passenger vans produced by the Japanese car manufacturer Toyota. These vehicles originally utilized the cab-over-engine configuration, although since 1996 a semi-cab-over arrangement has featured instead. The LiteAce launched in 1970 as light-duty truck, with commercial and van/wagon body variants added in 1971. In 1976, Toyota
Toyota
released the larger TownAce van/wagon that derived from the LiteAce; a TownAce truck arrived later in 1978. Between 1982 and 1992, the series accommodated the MasterAce Surf—an upscale TownAce passenger wagon. The two model lines existed separately until 1982 when TownAce trucks became rebadged LiteAce trucks—then in 1992 LiteAce vans became rebranded TownAce vans—thus unifying the once separate vehicle lines
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Nissan Prairie
The Nissan
Nissan
Prairie, introduced in Japan
Japan
in 1981 and Europe
Europe
in 1982, was a car from Japanese manufacturer Nissan. It was also known as the Multi in Canada
Canada
and the Stanza Wagon in the United States. In Japan, it was exclusive to Nissan
Nissan
Bluebird Store locations, then later at Nissan
Nissan
Blue Stage sales channels
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Mitsubishi Chariot
The Mitsubishi Chariot
Chariot
is a small multi-purpose vehicle (MPV) manufactured and marketed by Mitsubishi from 1983 to 2003. Based on the SSW concept car first exhibited at the 23rd Tokyo Motor Show
Tokyo Motor Show
in 1979,[2] the MPV derives its nameplate from chariots used of the ancient Greek and Roman Empires.[3] Internationally, the MPV has been marketed as the Mitsubishi Space Wagon, Mitsubishi Nimbus and Mitsubishi Expo — and as the Dodge and Plymouth Colt Vista Wagon, as captive imports in North America, and as the Eagle Vista
Eagle Vista
Wagon in Canada
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Kei Car
Kei car, K-car, or kei jidōsha (軽自動車, lit. "light automobile") (pronounced [keːdʑidoːɕa]), is a Japanese category of small vehicles, including passenger cars (kei cars or kei-class cars), microvans, and pickup trucks (kei trucks or kei-class trucks). They are designed to comply with Japanese government tax and insurance regulations, and in most rural areas are exempted from the requirement to certify that adequate parking is available for the vehicle.[2][3][4] This especially advantaged class of cars was developed to popularize motorization in the postwar era
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Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Telegraph (newspaper)
The Daily Telegraph, commonly referred to simply as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London
London
by Telegraph Media Group
Telegraph Media Group
and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally. It was founded by Arthur B
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White Van Man
"White van man" is a stereotype used in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
for a smaller-sized commercial van driver,[1] typically perceived as a selfish, inconsiderate driver who is mostly petit bourgeois and often aggressive.[2] According to this stereotype, the "white van man" is typically an independent tradesperson, such as a plumber or locksmith, self-employed, or running a small enterprise,[2] for whom driving a commercial vehicle is not their main line of business, as it would be for a professional freight-driver.[3]Contents1 Usage 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksUsage[edit] The first recorded use in the British press was in an article titled "Number is up for White Van Man – scourge of the road." published by The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
on 18 May 1997 written by Jonathan Leake, that paper's then-transport editor. Later in 1997, it was used by BBC Radio 2's Sarah Kennedy
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Working Class
The working class (also labouring class and proletariat) are the people employed for wages, especially in manual-labour occupations and industrial work.[1] Working-class occupations include blue-collar jobs, some white-collar jobs, and most pink-collar jobs
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Mercedes-Benz Sprinter
Sprinter can refer to:Contents1 In sport 2 Motor vehicles 3 Trains 4 Other 5 See alsoIn sport[edit]A participant in sprint (running) Sprinter (cycling), a type of racing cyclist A sprint car racing vehicleMotor vehicles[edit] Mercedes-Benz Sprinter (or 'Dodge Sprinter', 'Freightliner Sprinter'), a cargo van Toyota Sprinter, a compact carTrains[edit] Sprinter (train), a diesel multiple
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He
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Kurogane Baby
The Kurogane Baby
Kurogane Baby
was a keitora and microvan built by the Japanese Kurogane company from April 1959 until January 1961, sold only in Japan.[1] It was developed by a company of which Kurogane had assumed operations, called Ohta Jidosha, but was introduced under the Kurogane brand and was only available until 1962. It had a 356 cc water cooled, overhead valve two-cylinder engine installed in the back of the vehicle, with rear-wheel drive. The more competitively priced Subaru Sambar
Subaru Sambar
and the Suzuki Carry
Suzuki Carry
proved to be more popular and the Baby was discontinued after less than two years. It was available in two bodystyles, a van and a pickup. References[edit]^ "Kurogane "Baby" specifications". Kurogane Baby. Retrieved 19 December 2016. This article about a classic post-war automobile produced between 1945 and 1975 is a stub
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Dodge Ram Van
The Dodge B-Series was a range of full-size vans that were produced by Chrysler Corporation from 1971 to 2003. Through their production, the full-size vans were sold under several different nameplates. Most examples were sold by the Dodge division, although rebadged versions were sold by the now-defunct Fargo and Plymouth divisions. Unfortunately, despite many customer requests, the Dodge Ram Van was not available in the desired 360 V8 model. [1][2] Although Chrysler would make two redesigns of the B-platform van, much of the exterior sheetmetal would remain nearly unchanged over 33 years of production, making it one of the longest-used automotive platforms in American automotive history
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