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High Sheriff Of Lancashire
The High Sheriff
High Sheriff
of Lancashire
Lancashire
is an ancient officer, now largely ceremonial, granted to Lancashire, a county in North West England.[1] High Shrievalties are the oldest secular titles under the Crown, in England and Wales. The High Sheriff
High Sheriff
of Lancashire
Lancashire
is the representative of the monarch in the county, and is the "Keeper of The Queen's Peace" in the county, executing judgements of the High Court through an Under Sheriff. Throughout the Middle Ages, the High Sheriff
High Sheriff
was a powerful political position; the sheriffs were responsible for the maintenance of law and order and various other roles. Some of its powers were relinquished in 1547 as the Lord Lieutenant
Lord Lieutenant
of Lancashire
Lancashire
was instated to deal with military duties
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John Of Gaunt, 1st Duke Of Lancaster
John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster, KG (6 March 1340 – 3 February 1399) was an English nobleman and member of the House of Plantagenet, the third of five surviving sons of King Edward III of England
Edward III of England
and Philippa of Hainault. He was called "John of Gaunt" because he was born in Ghent, then rendered in English as Gaunt. When he became unpopular later in life, scurrilous rumours and lampoons circulated that he was actually the son of a Ghent
Ghent
butcher, perhaps because Edward III was not present at the birth. This story always drove him to fury.[2] As a younger brother of Edward, the Black Prince, John exercised great influence over the English throne during the minority of Edward's son, King Richard II, and the ensuing periods of political strife
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Edward Baines (1774–1848)
Edward Baines (1774–1848)
Edward Baines (1774–1848)
was the editor and proprietor of the Leeds Mercury, (which by his efforts he made the leading provincial paper in England), politician, and author of historical and geographic works of reference
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Henry Farrington (MP)
Henry Farrington (by 1471-1549/51), of Farington, Leyland and Worden, Lancashire, was an English politician. He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Lancashire in 1529.[1] References[edit]^ http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1509-1558/member/farrington-henry-1471-154951This article about a Member of the Parliament of England (up to 1707) is a stub
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Clayton Hall
Clayton Hall
Clayton Hall
is a 15th-century manor house on Ashton New Road, in Clayton, Manchester, England. It is hidden behind trees in a small park.[1] The hall is a Grade II* listed building,[2] the mound on which it is built is a scheduled ancient monument, and a rare example of a medieval moated site (grid reference SJ88099857).[3] The hall is surrounded by a moat, making an island 66 m by 74 m.[3] Alterations were made to the hall in the 16th and 17th centuries, and it was enlarged in the 18th century.[2] The building has a Georgian and a Tudor half and is the remaining wing of a larger complex. The hall is reached across the moat over a listed stone bridge. The building is now run by the Clayton Hall
Clayton Hall
Living History Museum Trust
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John Byron (died 1450)
Sir John Byron MP (1386–1450) was an English nobleman, landowner, politician, and knight from the Byron family. He had estates in Clayton near Manchester and at South Stoke (now Stoke Rochford) in Lincolnshire. He was Member of Parliament for Lancashire in 1421 and 1429, and for Lincolnshire in 1447. Family Byron was the son and heir of Sir Richard Byron (1354–1415), the son and heir of James Byron of Clayton (c. 1300–1355) by his wife Elizabeth de Bernake. Sir John's mother was Joan de Colwick, daughter and heiress of William de Colwick of Colwick Hall. Marriage and issue In 1415 Byron married Margery Booth, daughter of John Booth, with whom he had a son, Sir Nicolas Byron, who was knighted by Prince Arthur in 1502. Sir Nicolas inherited his father's estates. References"Byron, Sir John (1386-1450), of Clayton, Lancs. and South Stoke, Lincs". History of Parliament Online
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Ralph Staveley
Variants: Staley, Staly, Stavele, Stavelegh, Stavlegh. The name Staveley can, in contemporary sources, be easily confused with Stanley or Stanelegh; and many scholars have fallen into this paleographical error. References to Sir
Sir
Ralph are, therefore, frequently to be found under the name of Stanley. Family and Education b.c.1362, s. and h. of Robert Staveley (d. by 1410) of Staveley by his w. Maud. m. Elizabeth, da. of Sir
Sir
Ralph Radcliffe*, wid. of Henry Trafford
Trafford
(d.1395) of Trafford, s.p. Kntd. by Aug. 1403.1 Offices Held Commr. to raise men and lead them against the northern rebels, Lancs. July 1403; of array, Derbys. Sept. 1403, Notts., Derbys. May 1405; to make an arrest, Lancs. Oct. 1404; of oyer and terminer, Derbys. July 1406 (disorder at Eckington). Steward, bailiff and master forester of the High Peak in the duchy of Lancaster, Derbys. and constable of the castle of the High Peak 3 Sept
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Sir Thomas Gerard, 1st Baronet
Sir Thomas Gerard, 1st Baronet (1560 – 16 February 1621) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1597 and 1621. Gerard was the son of Sir Thomas Gerard, of Bryn and his wife Elizabeth Port, daughter of Sir John Port, of Etwall, Derbyshire. He matriculated at Brasenose College, Oxford
Brasenose College, Oxford
on 20 July 1578, aged 18. In 1579 he was a student of the Inner Temple. His parents and brother John were Catholics and he was tutored by a Catholic. His first wife was a recusant and he employed a "notorious recusant" to educate his child and was described as "of evil affection in religion" in 1590. Nevertheless, in 1597, he was elected Member of Parliament for Liverpool.[1] He succeeded his father to the family estates in September 1601. He was knighted on 18 April 1603
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Hoghton Tower
Hoghton
Hoghton
Tower is a fortified manor house located about 0.7 miles (1 km) to the east of the village of Hoghton, Lancashire, England, and standing on a hilltop site on the highest point in the area. It takes its name from the de  Hoghton
Hoghton
family, its historical owners since at least the 12th century. The present house dates from about 1560–65. It was damaged during the Civil War and subsequently became derelict, but was rebuilt and extended between 1862 and 1901. The house is listed at Grade I, as is the Great Barn in its grounds, which is dated 1692. Also in the grounds are two structures listed at Grade II
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Richard Molyneux (died 1397)
Richard Molyneux (c.1368-1397), of Sefton, Lancashire, was an English politician. Family[edit] Molyneux was the eldest son and heir of Sir William Molyneux of Sefton who died in 1372. His mother was Agnes Hoghton, daughter of MP Sir Adam Hoghton of Hoghton. Agnes was the widow of Sir Thomas Banaster. Molyneux's second wife was Ellen, daughter of MP, Sir Robert Urswyk, by whom he had two sons and one daughter. Career[edit] He was a Member (MP) of the Parliament of England for Lancashire in January 1397.[1] References[edit]^ http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1386-1421/member/molyneux-richard-1368-1397Parliament of EnglandPreceded by Robert Urswyk Thomas Radcliffe Member of Parliament for Lancashire Jan. 1397 With: Robert Urswyk Succeeded by John le Boteler Ralph RadcliffeThis article about a Member of the Parliament of England (up to 1707) is a stub
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Nicholas Haryngton
Sir Nicholas Harrington of Hornby, Lancashire (c. 1345/6 – ~1404), was an English Member of Parliament. He was the third and youngest son of Sir John Harrington of Hornby and Katherine Banaster (d
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Henry, 1st Duke Of Lancaster
Henry of Grosmont, 1st Duke of Lancaster, 4th Earl of Leicester and Lancaster, KG[a] (c. 1310 – 23 March 1361), also Earl of Derby, was a member of the English nobility in the 14th century, and a prominent English diplomat, politician, and soldier. The son and heir of Henry, 3rd Earl of Lancaster, and Maud Chaworth, he became one of Edward III's most trusted captains in the early phases of the Hundred Years' War and distinguished himself with victory in the Battle of Auberoche. He was a founding member and the second Knight of the Order of the Garter in 1348,[1] and in 1351 was created duke. An intelligent and reflective man, Grosmont taught himself to write and was the author of the book Livre de seyntz medicines, a highly personal devotional treatise
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Thomas, 2nd Earl Of Lancaster
Thomas, Earl of Leicester
Earl of Leicester
and Lancaster (c. 1278 – 22 March 1322) was an English nobleman. A junior member of the House of Plantagenet, he was one of the leaders of the baronial opposition to his first cousin, Edward II of England.Contents1 Life 2 Titles and lands 3 Arms 4 Ancestry 5 References 6 Further readingLife[edit] See also: Despenser War Thomas was the eldest son of Edmund Crouchback, 1st Earl of Lancaster and Blanche of Artois, Queen Dowager of Navarre. Crouchback was the son of King Henry III of England.[1] His marriage to Alice de Lacy was not successful. They had no children together, while he fathered, illegitimately, with another woman, two sons. In 1317 she was abducted from her manor at Canford, Dorset
Dorset
by Richard de St Martin, a knight in the service of John de Warenne, 7th Earl of Surrey
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Peter De Rivaux
Peter
Peter
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Culture 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPeople[edit]List of people named Peter, a list of people with the given name Peter
Peter
(given name)
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William De Ferrers, 4th Earl Of Derby
William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby
Earl of Derby
(c. 1168 – c. 1247) was a favourite of King John of England. He succeeded to the estate (but not the title) upon the death of his father, William de Ferrers, 3rd Earl of Derby, at the Siege of Acre in 1190. He was head of a family which controlled a large part of Derbyshire
Derbyshire
which included an area known as Duffield Frith. He adopted his father's allegiance to King Richard as the reigning king. On Richard's return from the Third Crusade, in the company of David Ceannmhor and the Earl of Chester
Earl of Chester
he played a leading role in besieging Nottingham Castle, on 28 March 1194, which was being held by supporters of Prince John. For seven weeks after this he held the position of Sheriff of Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire.[1] On the accession of John after the death of his brother, in 1199, William gave him his allegiance, and became a great favourite
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Stephen De Segrave
Stephen de Segrave (or Stephen Sedgrave or Stephen Segrave) (c. 1171 – 9 November 1241) was a medieval Chief Justiciar of England.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Notes 4 ReferencesLife[edit] He was born the son of a certain Gilbert de Segrave of Segrave in Leicestershire, who had been High Sheriff of Warwickshire and Leicestershire in 1193. Stephen became a knight and was made constable of the Tower of London in 1220
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