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Great Moon Hoax
The "Great Moon
Moon
Hoax" refers to a series of six articles that were published in The Sun, a New York newspaper, beginning on August 25, 1835, about the supposed discovery of life and even civilization on the Moon. The discoveries were falsely attributed to Sir John Herschel, one of the best-known contemporary astronomers of that time. The story was advertised on August 21, 1835, as an upcoming feature allegedly reprinted from The Edinburgh
Edinburgh
Courant.[1] The first in a series of six was published four days later on August 25.Contents1 Article 2 Authorship 3 Reaction and effect 4 See also 5 Footnotes 6 References 7 External linksArticle[edit]Portrait of a man-bat ("Vespertilio-homo"), from an edition of the Moon
Moon
series published in NaplesThe headline read:“GREAT ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERIES LATELY MADE BY SIR JOHN HERSCHEL, L.L.D. F.R.S
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Lithograph
Lithography
Lithography
(from Ancient Greek λίθος, lithos, meaning 'stone', and γράφειν, graphein, meaning 'to write') is a method of printing originally based on the immiscibility of oil and water.[1] The printing is from a stone (lithographic limestone) or a metal plate with a smooth surface. It was invented in 1796 by German author and actor Alois Senefelder
Alois Senefelder
as a cheap method of publishing theatrical works.[2][3] Lithography
Lithography
can be used to print text or artwork onto paper or other suitable material.[4] Lithography
Lithography
originally used an image drawn with oil, fat, or wax onto the surface of a smooth, level lithographic limestone plate. The stone was treated with a mixture of acid and gum arabic, etching the portions of the stone that were not protected by the grease-based image
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France
France
France
(French: [fʁɑ̃s]), officially the French Republic (French: République française [ʁepyblik fʁɑ̃sɛz]), is a country whose territory consists of metropolitan France
France
in western Europe, as well as several overseas regions and territories.[XIII] The metropolitan area of France
France
extends from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the English Channel
English Channel
and the North Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
to the Atlantic Ocean. The overseas territories include French Guiana
French Guiana
in South America and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Ralph Waldo Emerson
(May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, lecturer, philosopher and poet who led the transcendentalist movement of the mid-19th century. He was seen as a champion of individualism and a prescient critic of the countervailing pressures of society, and he disseminated his thoughts through dozens of published essays and more than 1,500 public lectures across the United States. Emerson gradually moved away from the religious and social beliefs of his contemporaries, formulating and expressing the philosophy of transcendentalism in his 1836 essay "Nature". Following this work, he gave a speech entitled "The American Scholar" in 1837, which Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. considered to be America's "intellectual Declaration of Independence".[3] Emerson wrote most of his important essays as lectures first and then revised them for print
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Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
(/poʊ/; born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre. He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism
Romanticism
in the United States and American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story. Poe is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction.[1] He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career.[2] Poe was born in Boston, the second child of two actors
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Southern Literary Messenger
The Southern Literary Messenger
Southern Literary Messenger
was a periodical published in Richmond, Virginia, from August 1834 to June 1864. Each issue carried a subtitle of "Devoted to Every Department of Literature and the Fine Arts" or some variation and included poetry, fiction, nonfiction, reviews, and historical notes. It was founded by Thomas Willis White, who served as publisher and occasional editor until his death, in 1843. White hired Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
in 1835 as a staff writer and critic. Others involved with the periodical included Matthew Fontaine Maury and Maury's kinsman Benjamin Blake Minor
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Godey's Lady's Book
Godey's Lady's Book, alternatively known as Godey's Magazine
Magazine
and Lady's Book, was an American women's magazine that was published in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
from 1830 to 1878. It was the most widely circulated magazine in the period before the Civil War.[1] Its circulation rose from 70,000 in the 1840s to 150,000 in 1860.[2] In the 1860s Godey's considered itself the "queen of monthlies".Contents1 Overview 2 Contents 3 Influence 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] The magazine was published by Louis A. Godey from Philadelphia
Philadelphia
for 48 years (1830–1878).[3] Godey intended to take advantage of the popularity of gift books, many of which were marketed specifically to women.[4] Each issue contained poetry, articles, and engravings created by prominent writers and other artists of the time
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Jules Verne
24 March 1905(1905-03-24) (aged 77) Amiens, FranceCause of death Diabetes
Diabetes
mellitusResting place La Madeleine cemetery, Amiens, FranceOccupation Novelist, poet, playwrightNationality FrenchPeriod 1850–1905Notable worksTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea Journey to the Center of the Earth From the Earth to the Moon Around the World in Eighty Days The Mysterious Island Five Weeks in a Balloon Michael Strogoff Off on a Comet Robur the Conqueror An Antarctic Mystery Master of the WorldSpouse Honorine Hebe du Fraysse de Viane (Morel) VerneChildren
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From The Earth To The Moon
From the Earth to the Moon
From the Earth to the Moon
(French: De la terre à la lune) is an 1865 novel by Jules Verne. It tells the story of the Baltimore
Baltimore
Gun Club, a post- American Civil War
American Civil War
society of weapons enthusiasts, and their attempts to build an enormous Columbiad space gun and launch three people—the Gun Club's president, his Philadelphian armor-making rival, and a French poet—in a projectile with the goal of a moon landing. The story is also notable in that Verne attempted to do some rough calculations as to the requirements for the cannon and, considering the comparative lack of any data on the subject at the time, some of his figures are surprisingly close to reality
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The Memory Palace
The Memory Palace is a monthly historical podcast hosted by Nate DiMeo. The program features historical narratives concerning such subjects as the Cardiff Giant and the CIA project Acoustic Kitty
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A Trip To The Moon
A Trip to the Moon
Moon
(French: Le Voyage dans la Lune)[a] is a 1902 French adventure film directed by Georges Méliès. Inspired by a wide variety of sources, including Jules Verne's novels From the Earth to the Moon
Moon
and Around the Moon, the film follows a group of astronomers who travel to the Moon
Moon
in a cannon-propelled capsule, explore the Moon's surface, escape from an underground group of Selenites (lunar inhabitants), and return to Earth with a captive Selenite. It features an ensemble cast of French theatrical performers, led by Méliès himself in the main role of Professor Barbenfouillis, and is filmed in the overtly theatrical style for which Méliès became famous. The film was an internationally popular success on its release, and was extensively pirated by other studios, especially in the United States
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Science Fiction
Science
Science
fiction (often shortened to SF or sci-fi) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science
Science
fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".[1] It usually avoids the supernatural, unlike the related genre of fantasy
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Ludwig Maximilian University Of Munich
Ludwig Maximilian University
Ludwig Maximilian University
of Munich
Munich
(also referred to as LMU or the University of Munich, in German: Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) is a public research university located in Munich, Germany. The University of Munich
Munich
is Germany's sixth-oldest university in continuous operation.[n 1] Originally established in Ingolstadt
Ingolstadt
in 1472 by Duke Ludwig IX of Bavaria-Landshut, the university was moved in 1800 to Landshut
Landshut
by King Maximilian I of Bavaria
Bavaria
when Ingolstadt was threatened by the French, before being relocated to its present-day location in Munich
Munich
in 1826 by King Ludwig I of Bavaria
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Lunarcy!
Lunarcy! is a 2012 Canadian documentary film directed by Simon Ennis, and produced by Jonas Bell Pasht, Ron Mann and Jonah Bekhor. The film premiered at the 2012 Toronto Film Festival on September 8, and was distributed worldwide through German Screen. The film draws from a cast of real people who each have a unique connection to the moon. These include Alan Bean (an astronaut who was one of 12 people to have walked on the moon) and an individual who claims personal ownership of the moon.[1] One of the characters in this documentary is Professor Jaymie Matthews, an astrophysics professor at the University of British Columbia. At age 13 he lied about his age to be selected as the Youth Ambassador from Canada for the 1972 launch of Apollo 17. After the launch, the United States sent 13-year-old Matthews Canada's $5 million Apollo 17 Goodwill Moon Rock, which he kept under his bed for months
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True History
A True Story
A True Story
(Ancient Greek: Ἀληθῆ διηγήματα, Alēthē diēgēmata; Latin: Vera Historia or Latin: Verae Historiae) is a satirical novel written in the second century AD by the Greek-speaking Syrian author Lucian
Lucian
of Samosata, making fun of outlandish tales. It is the earliest known work of fiction to include travel to outer space, alien life-forms, and interplanetary warfare. The novel has been referred to as "the first known text that could be called science fiction".[1][2][3][4][5] The work was intended by Lucian
Lucian
as a satire against contemporary and ancient sources, which quote fantastic and mythical events as truth. Lucian's True Stories eludes a clear-cut literary classification
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