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Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh
(/ˈɡɪlɡəˌmɛʃ/;[1] 𒄑𒂆𒈦, Gilgameš, originally Bilgamesh 𒄑𒉈𒂵𒈩) is the main character in the Epic of Gilgamesh, an Akkadian
Akkadian
poem that is considered the first great work of literature,[2] and in earlier Sumerian poems. In the epic, Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh
is a demigod of superhuman strength who builds the city walls of Uruk
Uruk
to defend his people and, after the death of his friend Enkidu, then travels to meet the sage Utnapishtim, who had survived the Great Flood.[3] His name translates roughly to mean "The Ancestor is a Young-man",[4] from Bil.ga "Ancestor", Elder[5]:33 and Mes/Mesh3 "Young-Man".[5]:174[n 1] Gilgamesh
Gilgamesh
is generally seen by scholars as a historical figure, since inscriptions have been found which confirm the existence of other figures associated with him in the epic
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Al-Suyuti
Abū al-Faḍl ‘Abd al-Raḥmān ibn Abī Bakr ibn Muḥammad Jalāl al-Dīn al-Khuḍayrī al-Suyūṭī[2] (Arabic: جلال الدين عبد الرحمن بن أبي بكر بن محمد الخضيري السيوطي‎; c. 1445–1505 AD) was an Egyptian religious scholar, juristic expert and teacher, and one of the most prolific writers of the Middle Ages of Persian[3] origin, whose works deal with Islamic theology. In 1486, he was appointed to a chair in the mosque of Baybars in Cairo. He adhered to the Shafi'i
Shafi'i
madhhab and is one of the latter-day authorities of the Shafi'i
Shafi'i
School, considered to be one of the Ashabun-Nazzar (Assessors) whose degree of ijtihad is agreed upon
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Dingir
Dingir (𒀭, usually transliterated DIĜIR[1] Sumerian pronunciation: [tiŋiɾ]) is a Sumerian word for "god." Its cuneiform sign is most commonly employed as the determinative for religious names and related concepts, in which case it is not pronounced and is conventionally transliterated as a superscript "D" as in e.g. DInanna. The cuneiform sign by itself was originally an ideogram for the Sumerian word an ("sky" or "heaven");[2] its use was then extended to a logogram for the word diĝir ("god" or goddess)[3] and the supreme deity of the Sumerian pantheon An, and a phonogram for the syllable /an/. Akkadian took over all these uses and added to them a logographic reading for the native ilum and from that a syllabic reading of /il/
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Encyclopædia Britannica
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
( Latin
Latin
for "British Encyclopaedia"), published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., is a general knowledge English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia. It is written by about 100 full-time editors and more than 4,000 contributors, who have included 110 Nobel Prize
Nobel Prize
winners and five American presidents. The 2010 version of the 15th edition, which spans 32 volumes[1] and 32,640 pages, was the last printed edition; digital content and distribution has continued since then. The Britannica is the oldest English-language
English-language
encyclopaedia still in production. It was first published between 1768 and 1771 in the Scottish capital of Edinburgh, as three volumes
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Ashurbanipal
Ashurbanipal
Ashurbanipal
(Akkadian: Aššur-bāni-apli; Syriac: ܐܫܘܪ ܒܢܐ ܐܦܠܐ‎; 'Ashur is the creator of an heir'), also spelled Assurbanipal or Ashshurbanipal, was King of the Neo-Assyrian Empire from 668 BC to c
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Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
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Sulaymaniyah Museum
The Sulaymaniayh Museum (Kurdish: مۆزه‌خانه‌ی سلێمانی; Arabic: متحف السليمانية) is an archeological museum which is located within heart of the city of Sulaymaniyah, Sulaymaniyah
Sulaymaniyah
Governorate, Kurdistan Region, Iraq. It is also known as Slemani Museum or Sulaimaniya Museum.It is the second largest museum in Iraq, after the National Museum of Iraq
National Museum of Iraq
in Baghdad in terms of contents. It houses artifacts which date back to the pre-historic period to the late Islamic and Ottoman periods.Contents1 History1.1 Opening 1.2 Post-2003 1.3 UNESCO2 Gallery 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Opening[edit] The Museum was opened officially on July 14, 1961. Initially, it was composed of a small building in the Shorsh District. After several years, the Museum acquired a new and a large building in the heart of Salim Street in the year 1980 CE
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Demigod
The term demigod or demi-god can refer to a minor deity, a mortal or immortal who is the offspring of a god and a human, or a figure who has attained divine status after death.Contents1 Etymology 2 Classical 3 Modern use 4 Hinduism 5 China 6 See also 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The English term "demigod" is a calque of the Latin semideus, "half-god",[1] which was probably coined by the Roman poet Ovid
Ovid
in reference to less important gods, such as dryads.[2] Classical[edit] In the ancient Greek and Roman world, the word did not have a consistent definition and was rarely used.[3][4] The earliest recorded use of the term is by the archaic Greek poets Homer
Homer
and Hesiod. Both describe dead heroes as hemitheoi, or "half gods"
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Sumerian Language
Sumerian (Sumerian: 𒅴𒂠 EME.G̃IR15 "native tongue") is the language of ancient Sumer
Sumer
and a language isolate that was spoken in southern Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
(modern-day Iraq)
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Tell Haddad
Coordinates: 33°29′3″N 44°43′42″E / 33.48417°N 44.72833°E / 33.48417; 44.72833EshnunnaEshnunnac. 3000 BC–c. 1700 BCThe extent of Eshnunna's influence c. 1764 BCCapital EshnunnaGovernment MonarchyKing •  c. 2000 BC Urguedinna (first) •  c. 1700 BC Silli-Sin (last)Historical era Bronze Age •  Established c. 3000 BC •  Disestablished c. 1700 BCPreceded by Succeeded byApumFirst Babylonian DynastyToday part of  Iraq Eshnunna
Eshnunna
(modern Tell Asmar in Diyala Province, Iraq) was an ancient Sumerian (and later Akkadian) city and city-state in central Mesopotamia
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Euphrates
The Euphrates
Euphrates
(/juːˈfreɪtiːz/ ( listen); Sumerian: 𒌓𒄒𒉣 Buranuna, Akkadian: 𒌓𒄒𒉣 Purattu, Arabic: الفرات‎ al-Furāt, Syriac: ̇ܦܪܬ‎ Pǝrāt, Armenian: Եփրատ: Yeprat, Hebrew: פרת‎ Perat, Turkish: Fırat, Kurdish: Firat‎) is the longest and one of the most historically important rivers of Western Asia
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Germany
Coordinates: 51°N 9°E / 51°N 9°E / 51; 9Federal Republic
Republic
of Germany Bundesrepublik Deutschland (German)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto:  "Einigkeit und Recht und Freiheit" (de facto) "Unity and Justice and Freedom"Anthem: "Deutschlandlied" (third verse only)[b] "Song of Germany"Location of  Germany  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Location of
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Determinative
A determinative, also known as a taxogram or semagram, is an ideogram used to mark semantic categories of words in logographic scripts which helps to disambiguate interpretation
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Louvre
8.1 million (2017)Ranked 1st nationally Ranked 1st globallyDirector Jean-Luc MartinezCurator Marie-Laure de RochebrunePublic transit accessPalais Royal – Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
Louvre-Rivoli Website www.louvre.frThe Louvre
Louvre
(US: /ˈluːv(rə)/),[1] or the Louvre
Louvre
Museum (French: Musée du Louvre
Musée du Louvre
[myze dy luvʁ] ( listen)), is the world's largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine
Seine
in the city's 1st arrondissement (district or ward)
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Lion
P. l. atrox P. l. europaea P. l. melanochaita (Sensu stricto) P. l. sinhaleyus P. l. spelaea P. l. vereshchaginiDistribution of Panthera
Panthera
leo in Africa
Africa
and Eurasia, in the past and present.Synonyms Felis
Felis
leo Linnaeus, 1758The lion ( Panthera
Panthera
leo) is a species in the family Felidae
Felidae
and a member of the genus Panthera. It is the second largest extant species after the tiger. It exhibits a pronounced sexual dimorphism; males are larger than females with a typical weight range of 150 to 250 kg (331 to 551 lb) for the former and 120 to 182 kg (265 to 401 lb) for the latter
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Lagash
Lagash[4]/ˈleɪɡæʃ/ (cuneiform: 𒉢𒁓𒆷𒆠 LAGAŠKI; Sumerian: Lagaš) is an ancient city located northwest of the junction of the Euphrates
Euphrates
and Tigris
Tigris
rivers and east of Uruk, about 22 kilometres (14 mi) east of the modern town of Ash Shatrah, Iraq. Lagash
Lagash
(modern Al-Hiba) was one of the oldest cities of the Ancient Near East. The ancient site of Nina (modern Surghul) is around 10 km (6.2 mi) away and marks the southern limit of the state
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