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FM Broadcast Band
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
is the distribution of audio or video content to a dispersed audience via any electronic mass communications medium, but typically one using the electromagnetic spectrum (radio waves), in a one-to-many model.[1][2] Broadcasting
Broadcasting
began with AM radio, which came into popular use around 1920 with the spread of vacuum tube radio transmitters and receivers. Before this, all forms of electronic communication (early radio, telephone, and telegraph) were one-to-one, with the message intended for a single recipient
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Broadcast (other)
Broadcast or Broadcasting
Broadcasting
may refer to:Broadcasting, the transmission of audio and video signals Broadcast, an individual television program or radio programMusic[edit]Broadcast (band), an English electronic music band Broadcast (Cutting Crew album), a 1986 rock album by Cutting Crew Broadcast (Meese album), a 2009 indie rock album by Meese Broadcasting..., a Comeback Kid album released in 2007 Broadcast Twelve Records, a British record label of the 1920sMagazines[edit]Broadcast (magazine), a weekly newspaper for the UK television and radio industry
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Electromagnet
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current. The magnetic field disappears when the current is turned off. Electromagnets usually consist of wire wound into a coil. A current through the wire creates a magnetic field which is concentrated in the hole in the center of the coil. The wire turns are often wound around a magnetic core made from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material such as iron; the magnetic core concentrates the magnetic flux and makes a more powerful magnet. The main advantage of an electromagnet over a permanent magnet is that the magnetic field can be quickly changed by controlling the amount of electric current in the winding
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Retransmission Consent
Retransmission consent is a provision of the 1992 United States Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act that requires cable operators and other multichannel video programming distributors (MVPDs) to obtain permission from broadcasters before carrying their programming. A broadcast station (or its affiliated/parent broadcast network) may propose that the cable operator, such as Charter Communications, pay cash to carry the station or ask for any other form of consideration, such as an additional channel for supplementary programs. The cable operator may also refuse the broadcaster's proposal, in which case the station may refuse to allow the cable operator to retransmit its signal.[1] America's Talking (now MSNBC), FX, and ESPN2
ESPN2
all originated through retransmission consent deals in the early 1990s. Many PBS stations received additional local channels
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Streaming Media
Streaming media
Streaming media
is multimedia that is constantly received by and presented to an end-user while being delivered by a provider. The verb "to stream" refers to the process of delivering or obtaining media in this manner; the term refers to the delivery method of the medium, rather than the medium itself, and is an alternative to file downloading, a process in which the end-user obtains the entire file for the content before watching or listening to it. A client end-user can use their media player to start playing the data file (such as a digital file of a movie or song) before the entire file has been transmitted. Distinguishing delivery method from the media distributed applies specifically to telecommunications networks, as most of the delivery systems are either inherently streaming (e.g. radio, television, streaming apps) or inherently non-streaming (e.g. books, video cassettes, audio CDs)
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History Of Broadcasting
The first broadcasting of a radio transmission consisted of Morse code (or wireless telegraphy) was made from a temporary station set up by Guglielmo Marconi
Guglielmo Marconi
in 1895. This followed on from pioneering work in the field by Alessandro Volta, André-Marie Ampère, Georg Ohm, James Clerk Maxwell and Heinrich Hertz.[2][3][4] The broadcasting of music and talk via radio started experimentally around 1905-1906, and commercially around 1920 to 1923. VHF
VHF
(very high frequency) stations started 30 to 35 years later. In the early days, radio stations broadcast on the long wave, medium wave and short wave bands, and later on VHF
VHF
(very high frequency) and UHF (ultra high frequency)
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Morse Code
Morse code
Morse code
is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. It is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph. The International Morse Code[1] encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals
Arabic numerals
and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes",[1] or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code
Morse code
symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes
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Samuel F. B. Morse
Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872) was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code
Morse code
and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.Contents1 Birth and education 2 Painting 3 Attributed artworks 4 Telegraph 5 Relays 6 Federal support 7 Patent 8 Political views 9 Marriages 10 Later years10.1 Litigation over telegraph patent 10.2 Foreign recognition 10.3 Transatlantic cable 10.4 Last years and death11 Honors and awards 12 Patents 13 Notes 14 References 15 Further reading 16 External linksBirth and educationBirthplace of Morse, Charlestown, Massachusetts, c. 1898 photo.Samuel F. B
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Physicist
A physicist is a scientist who has specialized knowledge in the field of physics, which encompasses the interactions of matter and energy at all length and time scales in the physical universe. [1][2] Physicists generally are interested in the root or ultimate causes of phenomena, and usually frame their understanding in mathematical terms. Physicists work across a wide range of research fields, spanning all length scales: from sub-atomic and particle physics, to molecular length scales of chemical and biological interest, to cosmological length scales encompassing the Universe
Universe
as a whole
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Joseph Henry
Joseph Henry
Joseph Henry
(December 17, 1797 – May 13, 1878) was an American scientist who served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. He was the secretary for the National Institute for the Promotion of Science, a precursor of the Smithsonian Institution.[1] He was highly regarded during his lifetime. While building electromagnets, Henry discovered the electromagnetic phenomenon of self-inductance. He also discovered mutual inductance independently of Michael Faraday, though Faraday was the first to make the discovery and publish his results.[2][3][4] Henry developed the electromagnet into a practical device. He invented a precursor to the electric doorbell (specifically a bell that could be rung at a distance via an electric wire, 1831)[5] and electric relay (1835).[6] The SI unit of inductance, the henry, is named in his honor
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Alfred Vail
Alfred Lewis Vail (September 25, 1807 – January 18, 1859) was an American machinist and inventor. Along with Samuel Morse, Vail was central in developing and commercializing American telegraphy between 1837 and 1844.[1] Vail and Morse were the first two telegraph operators on Morse's first experimental line between Washington, DC, and Baltimore, and Vail took charge of building and managing several early telegraph lines between 1845 and 1848. He was also responsible for several technical innovations of Morse's system, particularly the sending key and improved recording registers and relay magnets
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Electrical Telegraph
Electricity
Electricity
is the set of physical phenomena associated with the presence and motion of electric charge. Although initially considered a phenomenon separate from magnetism, since the development of Maxwell's equations, both are recognized as part of a single phenomenon: electromagnetism. Various common phenomena are related to electricity, including lightning, static electricity, electric heating, electric discharges and many others. The presence of an electric charge, which can be either positive or negative, produces an electric field. The movement of electric charges is an electric current and produces a magnetic field. When a charge is placed in a location with a non-zero electric field, a force will act on it. The magnitude of this force is given by Coulomb's law. Thus, if that charge were to move, the electric field would be doing work on the electric charge
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Electric Current
An electric current is a flow of electric charge.[1]:2 In electric circuits this charge is often carried by moving electrons in a wire. It can also be carried by ions in an electrolyte, or by both ions and electrons such as in an ionised gas (plasma).[2] The SI unit
SI unit
for measuring an electric current is the ampere, which is the flow of electric charge across a surface at the rate of one coulomb per second. Electric current
Electric current
is measured using a device called an ammeter.[3] Electric currents cause Joule
Joule
heating, which creates light in incandescent light bulbs. They also create magnetic fields, which are used in motors, inductors and generators. The moving charged particles in an electric current are called charge carriers. In metals, one or more electrons from each atom are loosely bound to the atom, and can move freely about within the metal
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International Morse Code
Morse code
Morse code
is a method of transmitting text information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks that can be directly understood by a skilled listener or observer without special equipment. It is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph. The International Morse Code[1] encodes the ISO basic Latin alphabet, some extra Latin letters, the Arabic numerals
Arabic numerals
and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns) as standardized sequences of short and long signals called "dots" and "dashes",[1] or "dits" and "dahs", as in amateur radio practice. Because many non-English natural languages use more than the 26 Roman letters, extensions to the Morse alphabet exist for those languages. Each Morse code
Morse code
symbol represents either a text character (letter or numeral) or a prosign and is represented by a unique sequence of dots and dashes
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Terrestrial Television
Terrestrial television
Terrestrial television
or broadcast television is a type of television broadcasting in which the television signal is transmitted by radio waves from the terrestrial (Earth based) transmitter of a television station to a TV receiver having an antenna. The term is more common in Europe, while in North America
North America
it is referred to as broadcast television or sometimes over-the-air television (OTA)
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AM Band
Medium wave
Medium wave
(MW) is the part of the medium frequency (MF) radio band used mainly for AM radio broadcasting. For Europe
Europe
the M W band
W band
ranges from 526.5 kHz to 1606.5 kHz,[1] using channels spaced every 9 kHz, and in North America
North America
an extended MW broadcast band ranges from 525 kHz to 1705 kHz,[2] using 10 kHz spaced channels
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