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FidoNet
FidoNet
FidoNet
is a worldwide computer network that is used for communication between bulletin board systems (BBSes). It uses a store-and-forward system to exchange private (email) and public (forum) messages between the BBSes in the network, as well as other files and protocols in some cases. The FidoNet
FidoNet
system was based on a number of small interacting programs. Only one of these interacted with the BBS
BBS
system directly and was the only portion that had to be ported to support other BBS software. This greatly eased porting, and FidoNet
FidoNet
was one of the few networks that was widely supported by almost all BBS
BBS
software, as well as a number of non- BBS
BBS
online services
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M+NetMail
M+NetMail is an ISP-grade E-mail
E-mail
package by Messaging Architects. It is designed to deliver scalable messaging and calendaring services, using Internet-standard protocols (e.g. IMAP, iCalendar, POP, SMTP), across a large enterprise, or to a large group of users who are not particularly associated (for example, the user population of a typical ISP). The original name for the product, when owned by Novell, was Novell
Novell
Internet Messaging System (NIMS). Messaging Architects showcased NetMail on its MyRealBox website, this service was discontinued on June 1, 2011. In late February 2007, Novell
Novell
sold the Netmail source code to Messaging Architects,[1] which has since release a new version
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Alternet
AlterNet is a progressive news magazine that is a project of the non-profit Independent Media Institute.[5][6] Launched in 1998, AlterNet claims a readership of over 5.9 million visitors per month,[7] though the web ratings service Quantcast
Quantcast
estimates that it receives 1.3 million.[8] AlterNet publishes original content as well as journalism from a wide variety of other sources
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Area Code
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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Email Attachment
An email attachment is a computer file sent along with an email message. One or more files can be attached to any email message, and be sent along with it to the recipient. This is typically used as a simple method to share documents and images. A paper clip image is the standard image for an attachment in an email client.Contents1 Current usage1.1 Size limits2 Malware2.1 Dangerous file types3 History, and technical detail 4 ReferencesCurrent usage[edit] Size limits[edit] Email
Email
standards such as MIME don't specify any file size limits, but in practice email users will find that they can't successfully send very large files across the Internet. This is because of a number of potential limits:Mail systems often arbitrarily limit the size their users are allowed to submit.[1] A message will often pass through several mail transfer agents to reach the recipient
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Sysop
A sysop (/ˈsɪsɒp/; an abbreviation of system operator) is an administrator of a multi-user computer system, such as a bulletin board system (BBS) or an online service virtual community.[1] The phrase may also be used to refer to administrators of other Internet-based network services.[2] Co-sysops are users who may be granted certain admin privileges on a BBS. Generally, they help validate users and monitor discussion forums. Some co-sysops serve as file clerks, reviewing, describing, and publishing newly uploaded files into appropriate download directories.[3] Historically, the term system operator applied to operators of any computer system, especially a mainframe computer. In general, a sysop is a person who oversees the operation of a server, typically in a large computer system
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Power User
A power user or an experienced user is a computer user who uses advanced features of computer hardware,[1][2][3] operating systems,[4] programs,[5][6] or web sites[7] which are not used by the average user. A power user may not have extensive technical knowledge of the systems they use[8] and is not capable of computer programming or system administration, but is rather characterised by the competence or desire to make the most intensive use of computer programs or systems. In enterprise software systems, "Power User" may be a formal role given to an individual who is not a programmer, but who is a specialist in business software
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Offline Reader
An offline reader (sometimes called an offline browser or offline navigator) is computer software that downloads e-mail, newsgroup posts or web pages, making them available when the computer is offline: not connected to the Internet. Offline readers are useful for portable computers and dial-up access.Contents1 Variations1.1 Website-mirroring software 1.2 Offline mail readers2 List 3 See also 4 ReferencesVariations[edit] Website-mirroring software[edit] Website mirroring software is software that allows for the download of a copy of an entire website to the local hard disk for offline browsing. In effect, the downloaded copy serves as a mirror of the original site
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PCBoard
PCBoard (PCB) was a bulletin board system (BBS) application first introduced for DOS in 1983 by Clark Development Company. Clark Development was founded by Fred Clark. PCBoard was one of the first commercial BBS packages for DOS systems, and was considered one of the "high end" packages during the rapid expansion of BBS systems in the early 1990s. Like many BBS companies, the rise of the Internet starting around 1994 led to serious downturns in fortunes, and Clark Development went bankrupt in 1997. Most PCB sales were of two-line licenses; additional line licenses (in ranges of 5, 10, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 1000) were also available. A native 32-bit IBM OS/2 version became also available with PCB V15.22 and higher
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RelayNet
RelayNet was an e-mail exchange network[1] used by PCBoard
PCBoard
bulletin board systems (BBS's). By 1990, RelayNet comprised more than 200 bulletin board systems.[2] BBS's on RelayNet communicated via a communications protocol called RIME ( RelayNet International Mail Exchange). RelayNet was similar to FidoNet
FidoNet
in purpose and technology, although it used names for its nodes instead of Fido's numeric address pairs. Due to it being limited to PCBoard, it carried a much smaller amount of traffic than Fido. RIME was built up, starting in 1988, from a master hub owned by Bonnie Anthony, a local Psychiatrist, in Bethesda, Maryland and a subordinate hub owned by her brother, Howard Belasco, in The Bronx, New York
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Commodore 64
The Commodore 64, also known as the C64 or the CBM 64, is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International (first shown at the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas, January 7–10, 1982).[5] It has been listed in the Guinness World Records
Guinness World Records
as the highest-selling single computer model of all time,[6] with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units.[3] Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,509 in 2017).[7][8] Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20
Commodore VIC-20
and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM
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Lingua Franca
A lingua franca (/ˌlɪŋɡwə ˈfræŋkə/; lit. Frankish tongue),[1] also known as a bridge language, common language, trade language, vehicular language, or link language is a language or dialect systematically used to make communication possible between people who do not share a native language or dialect, particularly when it is a third language that is distinct from both native languages.[2] Lingua francas have developed around the world throughout human history, sometimes for commercial reasons (so-called "trade languages") but also for cultural, religious, diplomatic and administrative convenience, and as a means of exchanging information between scientists and other scholars of different nationalities.[3][4] The term originates with one such language, Mediterranean Lingua Franca
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Handshaking
In telecommunications, a handshake is an automated process of negotiation between two communicating participants (example "Alice and Bob") through the exchange of information that establishes the protocols of a communication link at the start of the communication, before full communication begins.[1]The handshaking process usually takes place in order to establish rules for communication when a computer attempts to communicate with another device. Signals are usually exchanged between two devices to establish a communication link
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TCP/IP
The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite is the conceptual model and set of communications protocols used on the Internet
Internet
and similar computer networks. It is commonly known as TCP/IP because the foundational protocols in the suite are the Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) and the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). It is occasionally known as the Department of Defense (DoD) model, because the development of the networking method was funded by the United States Department of Defense
United States Department of Defense
through DARPA. The Internet protocol
Internet protocol
suite provides end-to-end data communication specifying how data should be packetized, addressed, transmitted, routed, and received
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ASCII
ASCII
ASCII
(/ˈæski/ ( listen) ASS-kee),[1]:6 abbreviated from American Standard Code for Information Interchange, is a character encoding standard for electronic communication
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