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Erysipelotrichi
The Erysipelotrichia are a class of bacteria of the phylum Firmicutes. Species of this class are known to be common in the gut microbiome, as they have been isolated from swine manure[1] and increase in composition of the mouse gut microbiome for mice switched to diets high in fat.[2] Phylogeny[edit] The currently accepted taxonomy is based on the List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature (LSPN)[3][4] and the phylogeny is based on 16S rRNA-based LTP release 111 by 'The All-Species Living Tree' Project.[5]Aphragmobacteria Haloplasma contractile Antunes et al. 2008 Turicibacter
Turicibacter
sanguinis Bosshard et al. 2002Erysipelotrichaceae 2 Clostridium ramosum (Veillon and Zuber 1898) Holdeman et al. 1971Clostridium saccharogumia Clavel et al. 2007 Clostridium cocleatum Kaneuchi et al. 1979Clostridium spiroforme Kaneuchi et al
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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List Of Prokaryotic Names With Standing In Nomenclature
List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN) is an online database that maintains information on the naming and taxonomy of prokaryotes,[1] following the taxonomy requirements and rulings of the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria.[2] The database was curated from 1997 to June 2013 by J. P. Euzéby.[3] From July 2013, LPSN is curated by Aidan C. Parte.[2] Bacterial and Archaeal taxonomy is updated through the journal International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (IJSB/IJSEM). LPSN is hosted by gandi.net servers located in Baltimore, USA.[4] The site, in addition to keeping track of current taxonomic names, has several reference resources explaining minimal standards for the description of new taxa,[5][3] Latin and Greek grammar aids[6] and lists culture collections worldwide which deal in prokaryotes culture.[7] References[edit]^ Wackett LP (5 June 2014). "Microbial strain collections and information"
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Chloroflexales
Chloroflexaceae Chloroflexales is one of two orders of bacteria in the class Chloroflexi.[1] See also[edit]List of bacterial ordersReferences[edit]^ Garrity, George M. (2001). Bergey's manual of systematic bacteriology (2nd ed.). New York: Springer. pp. 427–446. ISBN 978-0-387-21609-6. External links[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to ChloroflexalesTaxon identifiersWd: Q15241287 EoL: 7816 GBIF: 1206 iNaturalist: 152331 ITIS: 956205 NCBI: 32064 WoRMS: 571104This bacteria-related article is a stub
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Thermales
Thermales is an order of bacteria belonging to the Deinococcus–Thermus phylum.[1] They are particularly resistant to heat, and live in the benthic zone of the Gulf of Mexico.[2] References[edit]^ Fred A. Rainey; Milton S. da Costa (14 September 2015). "Thermales ord. nov". Bergey's Manual of Systematics of Archaea and Bacteria. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. doi:10.1002/9781118960608.obm00045. Archived from the original on 18 December 2016. Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ John W. Tunnell, Jr.; Darryl L. Felder; Sylvia A. Earle; David K. Camp, eds. (2009). "Gulf of Mexico Origin, Waters, and Biota: Biodiversity". Texas A&M University Press: 38. ISBN 9781603442695. Retrieved 18 December 2016. Taxon identifiersWd: Q7783079 EoL: 7800 EPPO: 1THRSO GBIF: 1208 iNaturalist: 152328 ITIS: 956274 NCBI: 68933 WoRMS: 564388This bacteria-related article is a stub
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Bacterial Outer Membrane
The bacterial outer membrane is found in gram-negative bacteria. Its composition is distinct from that of the inner cytoplasmic cell membrane - among other things, the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of many gram-negative bacteria includes a complex lipopolysaccharide whose lipid portion acts as an endotoxin - and in some bacteria such as E. coli it is linked to the cell's peptidoglycan by Braun's lipoprotein. Porins can be found in this layer.[1]Contents1 Clinical significance 2 Biogenesis 3 See also 4 ReferencesClinical significance[edit] If lipid A, part of the LPS, enters the circulatory system it causes a toxic reaction by activating TLR 4. Lipid A
Lipid A
is very pathogenic and not immunogenic. However, the polysaccharide component is very immunogenic, but not pathogenic, causing an aggressive response by the immune system. The sufferer will have a high temperature and respiration rate and a low blood pressure
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Domain (biology)
Eukaryota
Eukaryota
(represented by the Australian green tree frog, left), Bacteria
Bacteria
(represented by Staphylococcus aureus, middle) and Archaea
Archaea
(represented by Sulfolobus, right).The hierarchy of biological classification's eight major taxonomic ranks. Life
Life
is divided into domains, which are subdivided into further groups. Intermediate minor rankings are not shown.In biological taxonomy, a domain (Latin: regio[1]), also superkingdom or empire,[2] is the highest taxonomic rank of organisms in the three-domain system of taxonomy designed by Carl Woese, an American microbiologist and biophysicist. According to the Woese system, introduced in 1990, the tree of life consists of three domains: Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya.[1] The first two are all prokaryotic microorganisms, or single-celled organisms whose cells have no nucleus
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Silva Comprehensive Ribosomal RNA Database
Comprehensive may refer to: Comprehensive layout, the page layout of a proposed design as initially presented by the designer to a client Comprehensive school, a state school that does not select its intake on the basis of academic achievement or aptitude Comprehensive examination, an exam taken in some countries by graduatesThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Comprehensive. If an internal
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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National Center For Biotechnology Information
The National Center for Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH). The NCBI is located in Bethesda, Maryland and was founded in 1988 through legislation sponsored by Senator Claude Pepper. The NCBI houses a series of databases relevant to biotechnology and biomedicine and is an important resource for bioinformatics tools and services. Major databases include GenBank
GenBank
for DNA
DNA
sequences and PubMed, a bibliographic database for the biomedical literature. Other databases include the NCBI Epigenomics database
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Clostridium Innocuum
Clostridium
Clostridium
innocuum (CLOIN) is an anaerobic, non-motile, gram-positive bacterium that reproduces by sporulation.[1] While there are over 130 species of Clostridia, C. innocuum is the third most commonly isolated. Although it is not normally considered an aggressive human pathogen, it has been isolated in some disease processes. C. innocuum and other Clostrida line the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract, and are considered normal gut flora.[2]Contents1 Characteristics and identification 2 Pathology 3 Drug resistance 4 References 5 External linksCharacteristics and identification[edit] Anaerobic gram-positive bacilli affecting human beings are generally divided into two distinct groups, those that form spores (Clostridium spp) and those that do not form spores. Within the spore-forming group of Clostridium
Clostridium
species, some are very pathogenic or toxigenic (C. perfringens) while others are rarely pathogenic
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Walter Migula
Emil Friedrich August Walter (or Walther) Migula (born 1863 in Żyrowa, Poland; died 1938 in Eisenach, Germany) was a Poland-born German botanist. In 1890, he was habilitated for botany at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, where he spent several years as a professor. At Karlsruhe, he also worked in the bacteriology department of the Food Research Institute. He was Professor of Botany
Botany
at the research academy at Eisenach. [1] He published many articles on the subjects of cryptogamic botany, bacteriology, and plant physiology. He is remembered for describing the proteobacterial genus Pseudomonas, and for publication of Kryptogamen-Flora von Deutschland, Deutsch-Österreich und der Schweiz [Cryptogamic Flora of Germany, Austria, and Switzerland], a work connected with Otto Wilhelm Thomé's Flora von Deutschland [Plants of Germany].[2] Other significant works by Migula include:Die Bakterien, 1891 [Bacteria] System der bakterien
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Clostridium Cocleatum
Clostridium
Clostridium
cocleatum is a Gram-positive
Gram-positive
and anaerobic bacterium from the genus of Clostridium
Clostridium
which has been isolated from the caecal content of a mouse in Miyazaki in Japan.[1][3][4][5][6][7] References[edit]^ a b Parte, A.C. "Clostridium". www.bacterio.net.  ^ " Clostridium
Clostridium
cocleatum Taxon Passport - StrainInfo". www.straininfo.net.  ^ "[Clostridium] cocleatum". www.uniprot.org.  ^ Parker, Charles Thomas; Garrity, George M. "Nomenclature Abstract for Clostridium
Clostridium
cocleatum Kaneuchi et al. 1979 (Approved Lists 1980)". The NamesforLife Abstracts. doi:10.1601/nm.3920.  ^ "Details: DSM-1551". www.dsmz.de.  ^ Boureau, H; Decré, D; Carlier, JP; Guichet, C; Bourlioux, P (June 1993)
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Clostridium Ramosum
Clostridium
Clostridium
ramosum is an anaerobic, non-motile, thin, spore-forming, gram-positive bacterium that is among the gut flora of humans.[2]Contents1 Research 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksResearch[edit] The bacterium has a possible obesogenic potential but the underlying mechanism of this observed effect in mice are unclear. It is suggested that this microbe under a high-fat diet helps to reinforce the sugar and fat absorption. The associated higher intake of energy-supplying nutrients makes the fat grow faster - a factor of obesity.[3] See also[edit]Human microbiomeReferences[edit]^ " Clostridium
Clostridium
ramosum". Taxonomicon. Universal Taxonomic Services. Retrieved 7 January 2012.  ^ Mohandas, Rajesh; Poduval, Rajiv D.; Unnikrishnan, Dilip; Corpuz, Marilou (2001). " Clostridium
Clostridium
ramosum Bacteremia and Osteomyelitis in a Patient with Infected Pressure Sores"
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Herpetosiphonales
Herpetosiphonaceae Herpetosiphonales is one of two orders of bacteria in the class Chloroflexi.[1] See also[edit]List of bacterial ordersReferences[edit]^ Garrity, George M. (2001). Bergey's manual of systematic bacteriology (2nd ed.). New York: Springer. pp. 427–446. ISBN 978-0-387-21609-6. External links[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to HerpetosiphonalesTaxon identifiersWd: Q16910608 EoL: 7814 GBIF: 573 iNaturalist: 152332 ITIS: 956232 NCBI: 189772 WoRMS: 564347This bacteria-related article is a stub
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